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Author

Andrew Y. Ng

Other affiliations: Max Planck Society, Baidu, Carnegie Mellon University  ...read more
Bio: Andrew Y. Ng is an academic researcher from Stanford University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Deep learning & Supervised learning. The author has an hindex of 130, co-authored 345 publication(s) receiving 164995 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Andrew Y. Ng include Max Planck Society & Baidu.
Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work proposes a generative model for text and other collections of discrete data that generalizes or improves on several previous models including naive Bayes/unigram, mixture of unigrams, and Hofmann's aspect model.
Abstract: We describe latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), a generative probabilistic model for collections of discrete data such as text corpora. LDA is a three-level hierarchical Bayesian model, in which each item of a collection is modeled as a finite mixture over an underlying set of topics. Each topic is, in turn, modeled as an infinite mixture over an underlying set of topic probabilities. In the context of text modeling, the topic probabilities provide an explicit representation of a document. We present efficient approximate inference techniques based on variational methods and an EM algorithm for empirical Bayes parameter estimation. We report results in document modeling, text classification, and collaborative filtering, comparing to a mixture of unigrams model and the probabilistic LSI model.

27,392 citations


Proceedings Article
03 Jan 2001-
Abstract: We propose a generative model for text and other collections of discrete data that generalizes or improves on several previous models including naive Bayes/unigram, mixture of unigrams [6], and Hof-mann's aspect model, also known as probabilistic latent semantic indexing (pLSI) [3]. In the context of text modeling, our model posits that each document is generated as a mixture of topics, where the continuous-valued mixture proportions are distributed as a latent Dirichlet random variable. Inference and learning are carried out efficiently via variational algorithms. We present empirical results on applications of this model to problems in text modeling, collaborative filtering, and text classification.

25,546 citations


Proceedings Article
Andrew Y. Ng1, Michael I. Jordan1, Yair Weiss2Institutions (2)
03 Jan 2001-
TL;DR: A simple spectral clustering algorithm that can be implemented using a few lines of Matlab is presented, and tools from matrix perturbation theory are used to analyze the algorithm, and give conditions under which it can be expected to do well.
Abstract: Despite many empirical successes of spectral clustering methods— algorithms that cluster points using eigenvectors of matrices derived from the data—there are several unresolved issues. First. there are a wide variety of algorithms that use the eigenvectors in slightly different ways. Second, many of these algorithms have no proof that they will actually compute a reasonable clustering. In this paper, we present a simple spectral clustering algorithm that can be implemented using a few lines of Matlab. Using tools from matrix perturbation theory, we analyze the algorithm, and give conditions under which it can be expected to do well. We also show surprisingly good experimental results on a number of challenging clustering problems.

8,315 citations


Proceedings Article
Richard Socher1, Alex Perelygin, Jean Y. Wu1, Jason Chuang2  +3 moreInstitutions (2)
01 Oct 2013-
TL;DR: A Sentiment Treebank that includes fine grained sentiment labels for 215,154 phrases in the parse trees of 11,855 sentences and presents new challenges for sentiment compositionality, and introduces the Recursive Neural Tensor Network.
Abstract: Semantic word spaces have been very useful but cannot express the meaning of longer phrases in a principled way. Further progress towards understanding compositionality in tasks such as sentiment detection requires richer supervised training and evaluation resources and more powerful models of composition. To remedy this, we introduce a Sentiment Treebank. It includes fine grained sentiment labels for 215,154 phrases in the parse trees of 11,855 sentences and presents new challenges for sentiment compositionality. To address them, we introduce the Recursive Neural Tensor Network. When trained on the new treebank, this model outperforms all previous methods on several metrics. It pushes the state of the art in single sentence positive/negative classification from 80% up to 85.4%. The accuracy of predicting fine-grained sentiment labels for all phrases reaches 80.7%, an improvement of 9.7% over bag of features baselines. Lastly, it is the only model that can accurately capture the effects of negation and its scope at various tree levels for both positive and negative phrases.

5,432 citations


Yuval Netzer1, Tao Wang1, Adam Coates1, Alessandro Bissacco2  +2 moreInstitutions (2)
01 Jan 2011-
TL;DR: A new benchmark dataset for research use is introduced containing over 600,000 labeled digits cropped from Street View images, and variants of two recently proposed unsupervised feature learning methods are employed, finding that they are convincingly superior on benchmarks.
Abstract: Detecting and reading text from natural images is a hard computer vision task that is central to a variety of emerging applications. Related problems like document character recognition have been widely studied by computer vision and machine learning researchers and are virtually solved for practical applications like reading handwritten digits. Reliably recognizing characters in more complex scenes like photographs, however, is far more difficult: the best existing methods lag well behind human performance on the same tasks. In this paper we attack the problem of recognizing digits in a real application using unsupervised feature learning methods: reading house numbers from street level photos. To this end, we introduce a new benchmark dataset for research use containing over 600,000 labeled digits cropped from Street View images. We then demonstrate the difficulty of recognizing these digits when the problem is approached with hand-designed features. Finally, we employ variants of two recently proposed unsupervised feature learning methods and find that they are convincingly superior on our benchmarks.

3,956 citations


Cited by
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Proceedings Article
Diederik P. Kingma1, Jimmy Ba2Institutions (2)
01 Jan 2015-
TL;DR: This work introduces Adam, an algorithm for first-order gradient-based optimization of stochastic objective functions, based on adaptive estimates of lower-order moments, and provides a regret bound on the convergence rate that is comparable to the best known results under the online convex optimization framework.
Abstract: We introduce Adam, an algorithm for first-order gradient-based optimization of stochastic objective functions, based on adaptive estimates of lower-order moments. The method is straightforward to implement, is computationally efficient, has little memory requirements, is invariant to diagonal rescaling of the gradients, and is well suited for problems that are large in terms of data and/or parameters. The method is also appropriate for non-stationary objectives and problems with very noisy and/or sparse gradients. The hyper-parameters have intuitive interpretations and typically require little tuning. Some connections to related algorithms, on which Adam was inspired, are discussed. We also analyze the theoretical convergence properties of the algorithm and provide a regret bound on the convergence rate that is comparable to the best known results under the online convex optimization framework. Empirical results demonstrate that Adam works well in practice and compares favorably to other stochastic optimization methods. Finally, we discuss AdaMax, a variant of Adam based on the infinity norm.

78,539 citations


Proceedings Article
03 Dec 2012-
Abstract: We trained a large, deep convolutional neural network to classify the 1.2 million high-resolution images in the ImageNet LSVRC-2010 contest into the 1000 different classes. On the test data, we achieved top-1 and top-5 error rates of 37.5% and 17.0% which is considerably better than the previous state-of-the-art. The neural network, which has 60 million parameters and 650,000 neurons, consists of five convolutional layers, some of which are followed by max-pooling layers, and three fully-connected layers with a final 1000-way softmax. To make training faster, we used non-saturating neurons and a very efficient GPU implementation of the convolution operation. To reduce overriding in the fully-connected layers we employed a recently-developed regularization method called "dropout" that proved to be very effective. We also entered a variant of this model in the ILSVRC-2012 competition and achieved a winning top-5 test error rate of 15.3%, compared to 26.2% achieved by the second-best entry.

73,871 citations


Proceedings Article
Karen Simonyan1, Andrew Zisserman1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 2015-
Abstract: In this work we investigate the effect of the convolutional network depth on its accuracy in the large-scale image recognition setting. Our main contribution is a thorough evaluation of networks of increasing depth using an architecture with very small (3x3) convolution filters, which shows that a significant improvement on the prior-art configurations can be achieved by pushing the depth to 16-19 weight layers. These findings were the basis of our ImageNet Challenge 2014 submission, where our team secured the first and the second places in the localisation and classification tracks respectively. We also show that our representations generalise well to other datasets, where they achieve state-of-the-art results. We have made our two best-performing ConvNet models publicly available to facilitate further research on the use of deep visual representations in computer vision.

49,857 citations


Proceedings Article
Karen Simonyan1, Andrew Zisserman1Institutions (1)
04 Sep 2014-
TL;DR: This work investigates the effect of the convolutional network depth on its accuracy in the large-scale image recognition setting using an architecture with very small convolution filters, which shows that a significant improvement on the prior-art configurations can be achieved by pushing the depth to 16-19 weight layers.
Abstract: In this work we investigate the effect of the convolutional network depth on its accuracy in the large-scale image recognition setting. Our main contribution is a thorough evaluation of networks of increasing depth using an architecture with very small (3x3) convolution filters, which shows that a significant improvement on the prior-art configurations can be achieved by pushing the depth to 16-19 weight layers. These findings were the basis of our ImageNet Challenge 2014 submission, where our team secured the first and the second places in the localisation and classification tracks respectively. We also show that our representations generalise well to other datasets, where they achieve state-of-the-art results. We have made our two best-performing ConvNet models publicly available to facilitate further research on the use of deep visual representations in computer vision.

38,283 citations


Book
Richard S. Sutton1, Andrew G. BartoInstitutions (1)
01 Jan 1988-
TL;DR: This book provides a clear and simple account of the key ideas and algorithms of reinforcement learning, which ranges from the history of the field's intellectual foundations to the most recent developments and applications.
Abstract: Reinforcement learning, one of the most active research areas in artificial intelligence, is a computational approach to learning whereby an agent tries to maximize the total amount of reward it receives when interacting with a complex, uncertain environment. In Reinforcement Learning, Richard Sutton and Andrew Barto provide a clear and simple account of the key ideas and algorithms of reinforcement learning. Their discussion ranges from the history of the field's intellectual foundations to the most recent developments and applications. The only necessary mathematical background is familiarity with elementary concepts of probability. The book is divided into three parts. Part I defines the reinforcement learning problem in terms of Markov decision processes. Part II provides basic solution methods: dynamic programming, Monte Carlo methods, and temporal-difference learning. Part III presents a unified view of the solution methods and incorporates artificial neural networks, eligibility traces, and planning; the two final chapters present case studies and consider the future of reinforcement learning.

32,257 citations


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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 130

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
202129
202031
201916
201813
201712
201610