scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

John Connell

Bio: John Connell is an academic researcher from University of Sydney. The author has contributed to research in topics: Tourism & Population. The author has an hindex of 48, co-authored 276 publications receiving 8211 citations. Previous affiliations of John Connell include The University of Nottingham Ningbo China & Leeds Beckett University.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The rise of medical tourism emphasises the privatisation of health care, the growing dependence on technology, uneven access to health resources and the accelerated globalisation of both health care and tourism.

892 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An overview is given of the short history and rapid rise of medical tourism, its documentation, and current knowledge and analysis of the industry.

465 citations

Book
27 Oct 2002
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a world of flows: music, mobility and transnational soundscapes, and aural architecture: the spaces of music and marketing place: music and tourism.
Abstract: 1. Into the music 2. Music and place: 'fixing' authenticity 3. Music and movement: overcoming space 4. The place of lyrics 5. Sounds and scenes: a place for music? 6. Music communities: national identity, ethnicity and place 7. New worlds: music from the margins? 8. A world of flows: music, mobility and transnational soundscapes 9. Aural architecture: the spaces of music 10. Marketing place: music and tourism 11. Terra Digitalia? Music, copyright and territory in the information age 12. The long and winding road

429 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new conceptualization of the influences of migration, circulation and remittances on recipient families, communities and societies in the island states of the South Pacific and the Caribbean is presented.
Abstract: For several decades there has been extensive migration from the small island states of the South Pacific and the eastern Caribbean to metropolitan countries, resulting in absolute population decline in some states and new social, economic and political relationships between these island regions and distant worlds. Early research on the consequences for island development of return migration and remittances dwelt upon the unproductive nature of expenditures and the various problems return migration and remittances cause. Questioning this view, a new conceptualization of the influences of migration, circulation and remittances on recipient families, communities and societies in the island states of the South Pacific and the Caribbean is presented. Regional similarities and differences are recognized, yet commonalities of island microstates’ experiences emerge. Remittances are a very significant private transfer of capital and return migrants represent people endowed with human capital, capable of enriching the social and cultural capital stocks of their island communities. In both insular regions, the consolidation of transnational linkages emphasizes the significance of diaspora relations for migrant households at home and abroad and offers some prospects for sustainable development, beyond those offered solely by domestic economic opportunities. Depuis plusieurs decennies, une migration considerable s’est developpee des petites iles etats du Pacifique du sud et des Antilles de l’est vers les pays metropolitains. Le resultat est un declin du nombre absolu de la population dans certains de ces etats et de nouvelles relations sociales, economiques et politiques entre ces regions des iles et les mondes eloignes. Les premieres recherches sur les consequences pour le developpement des iles de la migration de retour et des envois de fonds insistaient sur la nature improductive des depenses et sur les differents problemes causes par la migration de retour et les envois de fonds. Questionnant ce point de vue, nous presentons une nouvelle conception des influences de la migration, de la circulation et des envois de fonds sur les familles qui en beneficient, sur les communautes et sur les societes des iles etats du Pacifique du sud et des Antilles. Bien que les similarites et des differences regionales soient reconnues, des points communs dans les experiences des micro-etats emergent. Les envois de fonds sont un tranfert prive de capital tres significatif et les emigrants qui reviennent sont dotes de capital humain, capables d’enrichir le domaine social et culturel de leurs communautes des iles. Dans les deux regions insulaires, la consolidation des liens transnationaux demontre la signification des relations de la diaspora pour les familles migratrices chez elles et a l’etranger et offre des possibilites de developpement durable au-dela de ceux offerts uniquement par les opportunites economiques interieures.

191 citations


Cited by
More filters
28 Jul 2005
TL;DR: PfPMP1)与感染红细胞、树突状组胞以及胎盘的单个或多个受体作用,在黏附及免疫逃避中起关键的作�ly.
Abstract: 抗原变异可使得多种致病微生物易于逃避宿主免疫应答。表达在感染红细胞表面的恶性疟原虫红细胞表面蛋白1(PfPMP1)与感染红细胞、内皮细胞、树突状细胞以及胎盘的单个或多个受体作用,在黏附及免疫逃避中起关键的作用。每个单倍体基因组var基因家族编码约60种成员,通过启动转录不同的var基因变异体为抗原变异提供了分子基础。

18,940 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of nationalism are discussed. And the history of European ideas: Vol. 21, No. 5, pp. 721-722.

13,842 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that societies have inherent capacities to adapt to climate change, but these capacities are bound up in their ability to act collectively, and they argue that this capacity is limited by the nature of the agents of change, states, markets and civil society.
Abstract: The effects of observed and future changes in climate are spatially and socially differentiated. The impacts of future changes will be felt particularly by resource-dependent communities through a multitude of primary and secondary effects cascading through natural and social systems. Given that the world is increasingly faced with risks of climate change that are at the boundaries of human experience3, there is an urgent need to learn from past and present adaptation strategies to understand both the processes by which adaptation takes place and the limitations of the various agents of change – states, markets, and civil society – in these processes. Societies have inherent capacities to adapt to climate change. In this article, I argue that these capacities are bound up in their ability to act collectively.

2,346 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the nature of risk and vulnerabil-ity in the context of climate change and review the evidence on present-day adaptation in developing countries and on coordinated international action on future adaptation, arguing that all societies are fundamentally adaptive and there are many situations in the past where societies have adapted to changes in climate and to similar risks.
Abstract: The world' s climate is changing and will continue to change into the coming century at rates projected to be unprecedented in recent human history. The risks associated with these changes are real but highly uncertain. Societal vulnerability to the risks associated with climate change may exacerbate ongoing social and economic challenges, particularly for those parts of societies dependent on resources that are sensitive to changes in climate. Risks are apparent in agriculture, fisheries and many other components that constitute the livelihood of rural populations in developing countries. In this paper we explore the nature of risk and vulnerabil- ity in the context of climate change and review the evidence on present-day adaptation in developing countries and on coordinated international action on future adaptation. We argue that all societies are fundamentally adaptive and there are many situations in the past where societies have adapted to changes in climate and to similar risks. But some sectors are more sensitive and some groups in society more vulnerable to the risks posed by climate change than others. Yet all societies need to enhance their adaptive capacity to face both present and future climate change outside their experienced coping range. The challenges of climate change for development are in the present. Observed climate change, present-day climate variability and future expectations of change are changing the course of development strategies - development agencies and governments are now planning for this adaptation challenge. The primary challenge, therefore, posed at both the scale of local natural resource management and at the scale of international agreements and actions, is to promote adaptive capacity in the context of competing sustainable development objectives.

1,679 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Mobility has become an evocative keyword for the twenty-first century and a powerful discourse that creates its own effects and contexts as mentioned in this paper, and the concept of mobilities encompasses both the large-scale...

1,457 citations