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Laura Mulvey

Bio: Laura Mulvey is an academic researcher from Birkbeck, University of London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Movie theater & Narrative. The author has an hindex of 10, co-authored 45 publications receiving 7202 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1975-Screen
TL;DR: This paper used psychoanalysis to discover where and how the fascination of film is reinforced by pre-existing patterns of fascination already at work within the individual subject and the social formations that have moulded him.
Abstract: This paper intends to use psychoanalysis to discover where and how the fascination of film is reinforced by pre-existing patterns of fascination already at work within the individual subject and the social formations that have moulded him. It takes as its starting-point the way film reflects, reveals and even plays on the straight, socially established interpretation of sexual difference which controls images, erotic ways of looking and spectacle. It is helpful to understand what the cinema has been, how its magic has worked in the past, while attempting a theory and a practice which will challenge this cinema of the past. Psychoanalytic theory is thus appropriated here as a political weapon, demonstrating the way the unconscious of patriarchal society has structured film form.

5,533 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: Godard Melodrama Inside and Outside the Home Part III: ON THE MARGINS Frida Kahlo and Tina Modotti Part IV: AVANT-GARDE Film, Feminism and the Avant-Garde Dialogue with Spectatorship: Barbara Kruger and Victor Burgin 'Magnificent Obsession': An Introduction to the Work of Five Photographers Impending Time: Mary Kelly's Corpus PART V: BOUNDARIES Changes: Thoughts on Myth, Narrative and Historical Experience The Oedipus Myth: Beyond the Riddles of the Sphinx The
Abstract: Acknowledgements Introduction to Second Edition Introduction to First Edition PART I: ICONOCLASM The Spectacle is Vulnerable: Miss World 1970 Fears, Fantasies and the Male Unconscious or 'You Don't Know What is Happening, Do You Mr Jones?' Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema PART II: MELODRAMA Afterthoughts on 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema' inspired by King Vidor's Duel In The Sun (1946) Notes on Sirk and Melodrama Fassbinder and Sirk Images of Women, Images of Sexuality: Some Films by J.L.Godard Melodrama Inside and Outside the Home PART III: ON THE MARGINS Frida Kahlo and Tina Modotti PART IV: AVANT-GARDE Film, Feminism and the Avant-Garde Dialogue with Spectatorship: Barbara Kruger and Victor Burgin 'Magnificent Obsession': An Introduction to the Work of Five Photographers Impending Time: Mary Kelly's Corpus PART V: BOUNDARIES Changes: Thoughts on Myth, Narrative and Historical Experience The Oedipus Myth: Beyond the Riddles of the Sphinx The Young Modern Woman of the 1920s and Feminist Film Theory

1,301 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: In "Death 24 x a Second", Laura Mulvey as discussed by the authors explores how new technologies can give new life to old' cinema, and offers an original re-evaluation of film's history and also its historical usefulness.
Abstract: In "Death 24 x a Second", Laura Mulvey addresses some of the key questions of film theory, spectatorship and narrative. New media technologies, such as video and DVD, have transformed the way we experience film, and the viewers' relationship to film image and cinema's narrative structure has also been fundamentally altered. These technologies give viewers the means to control both image and story, so that films produced to be seen collectively and followed in a linear fashion may be found to contain unexpected (even unintended) pleasures. The tension between the still frame and the moving image coincides with the cinema's capacity to capture the appearance of life and preserve it after death. Mulvey proposes that with the arrival of new technologies and new ways of experiencing the cinematic image, film's hidden stillness comes to the fore, thereby acquiring a new accessibility and visibility. The individual frame, the projected film's best-kept secret, can now be revealed, by anyone, at the simple touch of a button. As Mulvey argues, easy access to repetition, slow motion and the freeze-frame may well shift the spectator's pleasure to a fetishistic rather than a voyeuristic investment in the cinematic object. The manipulation of the cinematic image by the viewer also makes visible cinema's material and aesthetic attributes. By exploring how new technologies can give new life to old' cinema, "Death 24 x a Second" offers an original re-evaluation of film's history and also its historical usefulness.

324 citations

Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss what price Hollywood pays for European intellectuals and Hollywood melodrama social hieroglyphics, reflections on Two films by Douglas Sirk close-ups and commodities.
Abstract: Introduction: Fetishisms.Part 1 What price Hollywood? Americanitis - European intellectuals and Hollywood melodrama social hieroglyphics - reflections on Two films by Douglas Sirk close-ups and commodities. Part 2 Dialectics of division: Pandora's box - topographies of curiosity cosmetics and abjection - Cindy Sherman 1977-87 the hole and the zero - Godard's visions of femininity. Part 3 Dollar-book Freud: from Log Cabin to Xanadu - psychoanalysis and history in "Citizen Kane" The carapace that failed - Osmane Sembene's Xala Netherworlds and the unconscious - Oedipus and Blue Velvet changing objects, preserving time.

157 citations

Book
16 Jun 2011

52 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors offer objectification theory as a framework for understanding the experiential consequences of being female in a culture that sexually objectifies the female body, and propose a framework to understand the effects of objectification on women.
Abstract: This article offers objectification theory as a framework for understanding the experiential consequences of being female in a culture that sexually objectifies the female body. Objectification the...

4,003 citations

Book
23 Nov 1995
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on youth cultures that revolve around dance clubs and raves in Great Britain and the U.S. and highlight the values of authenticity and hipness and explore the complex hierarchies that emerge within the domain of popular culture.
Abstract: Focusing on youth cultures that revolve around dance clubs and raves in Great Britain and the U.S., Sarah Thornton highlights the values of authenticity and hipness and explores the complex hierarchies that emerge within the domain of popular culture. She portrays club cultures as "taste cultures" brought together by micro-media like flyers and listings, transformed into self-conscious "subcultures" by such niche media as the music and style press, and sometimes recast as "movements" with the aid of such mass media as tabloid newspaper front pages. She also traces changes in the recording medium from a marginal entertainment in the 50s to the clubs and raves of the 90s. Drawing on the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Thornton coins the term "subcultural capital" to make sense of distinctions made by "cool" youth, noting particularly their disparagement of the "mainstream" against which they measure their alternative cultural worth. Well supported with case studies, readable, and innovative, Club Cultures will become a key text in cultural and media studies and in the sociology of culture.

1,964 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: The Jeaning of America is a posthumous publication based on a manuscript originally written by Kevin Glynn in 2013 and then edited by Jonathan Gray and Pamela Wilson in 2016.
Abstract: @contents: Selected Contents: Acknowledgements Why Fiske Still Matters Henry Jenkins Reading Fiske and Understanding the Popular Kevin Glynn, Jonathan Gray and Pamela Wilson Notes on Contributors Preface Chapter 1 The Jeaning of America Chapter 2 Commodities and Culture Chapter 3 Productive Pleasures Chapter 4 Offensive Bodies and Carnival Pleasures Chapter 5 Popular Texts Chapter 6 Popular Discrimination Chapter 7 Politics References Index

1,836 citations

Book
Judith Lorber1
01 Jan 1994
TL;DR: Lorber as discussed by the authors argues that gender is a product of socialization, subject to human agency, organization, and interpretation, and that it is a social institution comparable to the economy, the family, and religion in its significance and consequences.
Abstract: In this innovative book, a well-known feminist and sociologist-who is also the founding editor of Gender & Society-challenges our most basic assumptions about gender. Judith Lorber argues that gender is wholly a product of socialization, subject to human agency, organization, and interpretation, and that it is a social institution comparable to the economy, the family, and religion in its significance and consequences. Calling into question the inevitability and necessity of gender, she envisions a society structured for equality, where no gender, racial ethnic, or social class group is allowed to monopolize positions of power.

1,642 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors look back at Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema (VP&NC) itself (Laura Mulvey 1975), and the theoretical and political context in which it app...
Abstract: Preparing this piece, I found myself looking back, not only at “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” (“VP&NC”) itself (Laura Mulvey 1975), and the theoretical and political context in which it app...

1,285 citations