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Richard G. Buch

Bio: Richard G. Buch is an academic researcher from Children's National Medical Center. The author has contributed to research in topics: Amputation & Intractable pain. The author has an hindex of 4, co-authored 4 publications receiving 400 citations.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Cryosurgery has the advantages of joint preservation, excellent functional outcome, and low recurrence rate when compared with other joint preservation procedures, and it is recommended as an adjuvant to curettage for most giant cell tumors of bone.
Abstract: Between 1983 and 1993, 102 patients with giant cell tumor of bone were treated at three institutions. Sixteen patients (15.9%) presented with already having had local recurrence. All patients were treated with thorough curettage of the tumor, burr drilling of the tumor inner walls, and cryotherapy by direct pour technique using liquid nitrogen. The average followup was 6.5 years (range, 4-15 years). The rate of local recurrence in the 86 patients treated primarily with cryosurgery was 2.3% (two patients), and the overall recurrence rate was 7.9% (eight patients). Six of these patients were cured by cryosurgery and two underwent resection. Overall, 100 of 102 patients were cured with cryosurgery. Complications associated with cryosurgery included six (5.9%) pathologic fractures, three (2.9%) cases of partial skin necrosis, and two (1.9%) significant degenerative changes. Overall function was good to excellent in 94 patients (92.2%), moderate in seven patients (6.9%), and poor in one patient (0.9%). Cryosurgery has the advantages of joint preservation, excellent functional outcome, and low recurrence rate when compared with other joint preservation procedures. For these reasons, it is recommended as an adjuvant to curettage for most giant cell tumors of bone.

285 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The technique is reliable and can be performed by the surgeon, requiring about a ten-minute increase in operating time, and has potentially wide application in orthopedics in procedures in which the major nerves are easily accessible and for patients with intractable pain of the extremities.
Abstract: A new technique using postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia (PICRA) for postoperative pain relief was investigated in 23 surgical patients treated by amputation (12 patients) or by limb-salvage resection operations (11 patients). Bupivacaine was delivered into peripheral nerve sheaths via catheters placed therein at the time of surgery. Only patients in whom the nerves were easily accessible were treated. Catheters were placed in the axillary sheath, the lumbosacral trunk, and the femoral nerve sheaths of patients treated with shoulder girdle and pelvic procedures (resections and amputations), and within the sciatic nerve sheath of those treated with lower extremity procedures. The anesthetic agent was delivered at controllable rates. Regional analgesia was obtained in the operative site with minimal motor or sensory decrease. To assess the efficacy of this technique, the results of this study group were compared with those of a matched group of 11 patients treated with similar surgical procedures but who received epidural morphine. Eleven of the 23 patients on PICRA required no supplemental narcotic agents. The mean level of the narcotic agents required by the remaining 13 PICRA patients was approximately one third of that required by the matched group of 11 patients receiving epidural morphine. Overall, the patients on PICRA had an 80% reduction of narcotic requirements when compared to the historical controls. The technique is reliable and can be performed by the surgeon, requiring about a ten-minute increase in operating time. It has potentially wide application in orthopedics in procedures in which the major nerves are easily accessible (e.g., pelvic fractures and revision hip surgery) and for patients with intractable pain of the extremities.

60 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although major amputations are viewed at times as offering little to already‐compromised patients, they can improve dramatically the quality of life in selected patients.
Abstract: Palliative amputations were performed on 11 patients (7 men, 4 women) with disseminated disease to control local bony complications. The average patient age was 54 years (range 14-78 years). The primary diseases were melanoma/sarcoma (seven patients) and carcinoma (four patients). All had pain; eight had intractable pain that could not be controlled by analgesics. All 11 patients had additional severe local complications, which included recurrent pathological fracture (4), sepsis (2), hemorrhage (2), radiation necrosis (2), and iliofemoral thrombosis secondary to tumor (1). Previous attempts of palliation had been made in all 11 patients, and 8 had undergone previous operative procedures (5 had undergone two or more) prior to amputation. Three anterior hemipelvectomies, five posterior hemipelvectomies, two hip disarticulations, and one forequarter amputation were performed. All patients survived the surgery, and there were no intraoperative complications. All patients received dramatic relief of pain. Postoperative complications included two cases of flap necrosis and two infections; all resolved satisfactorily. The six patients who were nonambulatory before surgery ambulated postoperatively, and two eventually ambulated with a prosthesis. Six of 11 patients survived 1 year or longer, with a median postoperative survival period of 13 months (average 16 months). Although major amputations are viewed at times as offering little to already-compromised patients, they can improve dramatically the quality of life in selected patients.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors assessed the impact of two cycles of preoperative chemotherapy with intraarterial cisplatin (120 mg/m2) and continuous intravenous doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin) on the decision to perform a limb-sparing procedure (LSP) or amputation in 22 patients with high-grade bone sarcomas of the extremities.
Abstract: The authors assessed the impact of two cycles of preoperative chemotherapy (POCT) with intraarterial cisplatin (120 mg/m2) and continuous intravenous doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin; 20 mg/m2/day x 3 days) on the decision to perform a limb-sparing procedure (LSP) or amputation in 22 patients with high-grade bone sarcomas of the extremities. The tumor types were osteosarcoma (17), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (three), leiomyosarcoma (one), and malignant schwannoma (one). Surgical stages were IIA (three), IIB (17), and IIIB (two). The prechemotherapy surgical options chosen were 12 amputations (55% of patients) and ten LSPs (45%). The initial decisions to amputate were based on a combination of the following: improper biopsy (five cases), large tumors (ten) and those with neurovascular encroachment (six), and pathological fracture (one). Following chemotherapy, 18 LSPs (81%) and four amputations (19%) were performed. Nine of 12 patients (75%) initially deemed unresectable were converted to LSP. The median tumor response (necrosis; range, 0%-100%) was 70%; ten of 22 specimens had necrosis greater than 95%. Median tumor necrosis for the patients treated by amputation and LSPs was 45% and 88%, respectively. Following surgery, all patients received four additional cycles of cisplatin and doxorubicin. The median follow-up period is 30 months; six patients have developed metastatic disease, with a median disease-free interval of 16.6 months. The rate of local tumor control is 95% (21 of 22 patients).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

31 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The radiologic features of giant cell tumor (GCT) and giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of bone often strongly suggest the diagnosis and reflect their pathologic appearance, and recognition of the spectrum of radiologic appearances of GCT and GCRG is important in allowing prospective diagnosis, guiding therapy, and facilitating early detection of recurrence.
Abstract: The radiologic features of giant cell tumor (GCT) and giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of bone often strongly suggest the diagnosis and reflect their pathologic appearance. At radiography, GCT often demonstrates a metaepiphyseal location with extension to subchondral bone. GCRG has a similar appearance but most commonly affects the mandible, maxilla, hands, or feet. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are helpful in staging lesions, particularly in delineating soft-tissue extension. Cystic (secondary aneurysmal bone cyst) components are reported in 14% of GCTs. However, biopsy must be directed at the solid regions, which harbor diagnostic tissue. These solid components demonstrate low to intermediate signal intensity at T2-weighted MR imaging, a feature that can be helpful in diagnosis. Multiple GCTs, although rare, do occur and may be associated with Paget disease. Malignant GCT accounts for 5%–10% of all GCTs and is usually secondary to previous irradiation of benign GCT. Treat...

433 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The combination of all adjuncts (PMMA, burring, H2O2 − n = 42) reduces the likelihood of recurrence by the factor 28.2 compared to curettage only and therefore should be recommended as a standard treatment andTherefore, if the tumor reaches close to the articulating surface a subchondral bone graft can be performed without risking a higher recurrence rate.
Abstract: Background Two hundred and fourteen patients with benign giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), treated from 1980 to 2007 at the Department of Orthopedics of the University of Muenster (Germany), were analyzed in a retrospective study.

352 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Giant cell tumour (GCT) is still one of the most obscure and intensively examined tumours of bone; and there are still many unanswered questions with regard to both its treatment and prognosis.
Abstract: Giant cell tumour (GCT) is still one of the most obscure and intensively examined tumours of bone. Its histogenesis is uncertain. The histology does not predict the clinical outcome; and there are still many unanswered questions with regard to both its treatment and prognosis. The World Health Organisation has classified GCT as “an aggressive, potentially malignant lesion”, 1 which means that its evolution based on its histological features is unpredictable. Statistically, 80% of GCTs have a benign course, with a local rate of recurrence of 20% to 50%. About 10% undergo malignant transformation at recurrence and 1% to 4% give pulmonary metastases even in cases of benign histology.

340 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results from the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating from 1987 were significantly lower in patients who sustained a displaced fracture and results from the bodily pain section of the Short Form-36 also were found to be lower when a pathologic fracture was present.
Abstract: A multicentric retrospective study of giant cell tumor of bone was conducted among Canadian surgeons. The hypothesis was that no differences would be found in health status, function, or recurrence rate irrespective to the nature of filling material or adjuvant used in patients treated with curettage. One hundred eighty-six cases were collected. There were 96 females and 90 males. The mean age of the patients was 36 years (range, 14-72 years), the minimum followup was 24 months, and the median followup was 60 months. Sixty-two percent of the tumors involved the knee region. One hundred fifty-eight were primary tumors and 28 were recurrences. Campanacci grading was as follows: Grade 1, seven patients; Grade 2, 100 patients; Grade 3, 76 patients; and unknown in three patients. Fifty-six patients had a pathologic fracture. Resection was done in 38 patients and 148 patients had curettage. The latter was supplemented with high speed burring in 135 patients, cement in 64 patients, various combinations of autograft or allograft bone in 61 patients, phenol in 37 patients, and liquid nitrogen in 10 patients. Structural allografts were used in 25 patients. The overall recurrence rate was 17%, 18% after curettage, and 16% after resection. Patients with primary tumors treated with curettage had a 10% recurrence rate. For recurrent lesions treated by curettage, the recurrence rate was 35%. The nature of the filling material used or the type of adjuvant method used or any combination of both failed to show any statistical impact on the recurrence risk. The results from the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating from 1987 were significantly lower in patients who sustained a displaced fracture. Results from the bodily pain section of the Short Form-36 also were found to be lower when a pathologic fracture was present. Results from the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Rating 1987, the Short Form-36, and the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score did not show differences when either cement or bone graft were used after curettage.

338 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Use of polymethylmethacrylate as an adjuvant significantly reduces the recurrence rate following intralesional treatment of benign giant cell tumors, and it appears to be the therapy of choice for primary as well as recurrent giant cell tumor of bone.
Abstract: Background:The use of adjuvants after curettage has been well established for the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone. The purpose of this study was to analyze the rates of recurrence following different types of treatment as well as the influence of various factors of tumor presentation o

324 citations