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Yujing Jiang

Bio: Yujing Jiang is an academic researcher from Nagasaki University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Shear (geology) & Rock mass classification. The author has an hindex of 34, co-authored 215 publications receiving 3757 citations. Previous affiliations of Yujing Jiang include Dalian University of Technology & Shandong University of Science and Technology.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new shear-flow testing apparatus with specially designed fluid sealing techniques for rock fractures were developed, under constant normal load (CNL) or constant normal stiffness (CNS) constraint.

194 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a 3D laser scanning profilometer system was used to measure the surface roughness of a single rock joint under both constant normal load (CNL) and constant normal stiffness (CNS) conditions and measured the surfaces of rock joints before and after shearing.

184 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a fractal model that represents the geometric characteristics of rock fracture networks is proposed to link the fractal characteristics with the equivalent permeability of the fracture networks, which is shown to be significantly influenced by the tortuosity of the fluid flow and the aperture of the fractures.

174 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a mathematical equation is proposed to describe the relation between hydraulic aperture and mechanical aperture by means of the ratio of the standard deviation of local mechanical aperture to its mean value.

169 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an analytical model is proposed to predict the axial force of grouted rock bolt in the tunnelling design, and the interaction mechanism of the rock bolt and the soft rock mass has been described according to their consistent displacement.

163 citations


Cited by
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08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

11 Jun 2010
Abstract: The validity of the cubic law for laminar flow of fluids through open fractures consisting of parallel planar plates has been established by others over a wide range of conditions with apertures ranging down to a minimum of 0.2 µm. The law may be given in simplified form by Q/Δh = C(2b)3, where Q is the flow rate, Δh is the difference in hydraulic head, C is a constant that depends on the flow geometry and fluid properties, and 2b is the fracture aperture. The validity of this law for flow in a closed fracture where the surfaces are in contact and the aperture is being decreased under stress has been investigated at room temperature by using homogeneous samples of granite, basalt, and marble. Tension fractures were artificially induced, and the laboratory setup used radial as well as straight flow geometries. Apertures ranged from 250 down to 4µm, which was the minimum size that could be attained under a normal stress of 20 MPa. The cubic law was found to be valid whether the fracture surfaces were held open or were being closed under stress, and the results are not dependent on rock type. Permeability was uniquely defined by fracture aperture and was independent of the stress history used in these investigations. The effects of deviations from the ideal parallel plate concept only cause an apparent reduction in flow and may be incorporated into the cubic law by replacing C by C/ƒ. The factor ƒ varied from 1.04 to 1.65 in these investigations. The model of a fracture that is being closed under normal stress is visualized as being controlled by the strength of the asperities that are in contact. These contact areas are able to withstand significant stresses while maintaining space for fluids to continue to flow as the fracture aperture decreases. The controlling factor is the magnitude of the aperture, and since flow depends on (2b)3, a slight change in aperture evidently can easily dominate any other change in the geometry of the flow field. Thus one does not see any noticeable shift in the correlations of our experimental results in passing from a condition where the fracture surfaces were held open to one where the surfaces were being closed under stress.

1,557 citations

01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: In this article, the spectral ratio between horizontal and vertical components (H/V ratio) of microtremors measured at the ground surface has been used to estimate fundamental periods and amplification factors of a site, although this technique lacks theoretical background.
Abstract: The spectral ratio between horizontal and vertical components (H/V ratio) of microtremors measured at the ground surface has been used to estimate fundamental periods and amplification factors of a site, although this technique lacks theoretical background. The aim of this article is to formulate the H/V technique in terms of the characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves, and to contribute to improve the technique. The improvement includes use of not only peaks but also troughs in the H/V ratio for reliable estimation of the period and use of a newly proposed smoothing function for better estimation of the amplification factor. The formulation leads to a simple formula for the amplification factor expressed with the H/V ratio. With microtremor data measured at 546 junior high schools in 23 wards of Tokyo, the improved technique is applied to mapping site periods and amplification factors in the area.

1,130 citations

01 Jan 2016
TL;DR: In this paper, the stability of steady frictional sliding, inertia and the quasi-static limit of the quasistatic limit were investigated in the context of the ps 4.1 simulator.
Abstract: • Stability of steady frictional sliding, inertia and the quasi-static limit • work on ps 4; see course web site

659 citations

01 Jan 1981
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present an expression which gives the degree of confidence that can be assigned to the measured mean discontinuity spacing, and a reduced form of this expression is obtained for cases where the discontinuity spacings follow the negative exponential distribution.
Abstract: Abstract Knowledge of the spacing and size of discontinuities in a rock mass is of considerable importance for the prediction of rock behaviour. The characteristics of discontinuities can be estimated using scanline surveys but the precision of the estimates must be obtained and the bias caused by linear sampling must be eliminated before they can validly be used. Initially, an expression is presented which gives the degree of confidence that can be assigned to the measured mean discontinuity spacing. A reduced form of this expression is obtained for cases where the discontinuity spacings follow the negative exponential distribution. The precision of discontinuity frequency and RQD estimates is also explained. The distribution of trace lengths produced by the intersection of planar discontinuities with a planar rock face is used to determine the distribution of trace lengths, the distribution of semi-trace lengths and the distribution of censored semi-trace lengths intersected by a randomly located scanline. Comparison of the actual and sampled distributions demonstrates the bias introduced by scanline sampling of trace lengths. Relations between the distributions can be used to produce analytical or graphical methods of estimating mean trace length from censored measurements at exposures of limited extent.

505 citations