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JournalISSN: 1664-1078

Frontiers in Psychology 

Frontiers Media
About: Frontiers in Psychology is an academic journal published by Frontiers Media. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Medicine & Psychology. It has an ISSN identifier of 1664-1078. It is also open access. Over the lifetime, 36588 publications have been published receiving 598077 citations. The journal is also known as: Front. Psychol. & Front Psychol.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued Bayes factors allow theory to be linked to data in a way that overcomes the weaknesses of the other approaches, and provides a coherent approach to determining whether non-significant results support a null hypothesis over a theory, or whether the data are just insensitive.
Abstract: No scientific conclusion follows automatically from a statistically non-significant result, yet people routinely use non-significant results to guide conclusions about the status of theories (or the effectiveness of practices). To know whether a non-significant result counts against a theory, or if it just indicates data insensitivity, researchers must use one of: power, intervals (such as confidence or credibility intervals), or else an indicator of the relative evidence for one theory over another, such as a Bayes factor. I argue Bayes factors allow theory to be linked to data in a way that overcomes the weaknesses of the other approaches. Specifically, Bayes factors use the data themselves to determine their sensitivity in distinguishing theories (unlike power), and they make use of those aspects of a theory’s predictions that are often easiest to specify (unlike power and intervals, which require specifying the minimal interesting value in order to address theory). Bayes factors provide a coherent approach to determining whether non-significant results support a null hypothesis over a theory, or whether the data are just insensitive. They allow accepting and rejecting the null hypothesis to be put on an equal footing. Concrete examples are provided to indicate the range of application of a simple online Bayes calculator, which reveal both the strengths and weaknesses of Bayes factors.

1,496 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The R package (rmcorr) is introduced and its use for inferential statistics and visualization with two example datasets are used to illustrate research questions at different levels of analysis, intra-individual, and inter-individual.
Abstract: Repeated measures correlation (rmcorr) is a statistical technique for determining the common within-individual association for paired measures assessed on two or more occasions for multiple individuals. Simple regression/correlation is often applied to non-independent observations or aggregated data; this may produce biased, specious results due to violation of independence and/or differing patterns between-participants versus within-participants. Unlike simple regression/correlation, rmcorr does not violate the assumption of independence of observations. Also, rmcorr tends to have much greater statistical power because neither averaging nor aggregation is necessary for an intra-individual research question. Rmcorr estimates the common regression slope, the association shared among individuals. To make rmcorr accessible, we provide background information for its assumptions and equations, visualization, power, and tradeoffs with rmcorr compared to multilevel modeling. We introduce the R package (rmcorr) and demonstrate its use for inferential statistics and visualization with two example datasets. The examples are used to illustrate research questions at different levels of analysis, intra-individual, and inter-individual. Rmcorr is well-suited for research questions regarding the common linear association in paired repeated measures data. All results are fully reproducible.

1,135 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales.
Abstract: Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges’ polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues’ neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.’s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath’s coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

1,102 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper will provide psychophysiological researchers with recommendations and practical advice concerning experimental designs, data analysis, and data reporting to ensure that researchers starting a project with HRV and cardiac vagal tone are well informed regarding methodological considerations in order for their findings to contribute to knowledge advancement in their field.
Abstract: Psychophysiological research integrating heart rate variability (HRV) has increased during the last two decades, particularly given the fact that HRV is able to index cardiac vagal tone. Vagal tone, which represents the activity of the parasympathetic system, is acknowledged to be linked with many phenomena relevant for psychophysiological research, including self-regulation at the cognitive, emotional, social, and health levels. The ease of HRV collection and measurement coupled with the fact it is relatively affordable, non-invasive and pain free makes it widely accessible to many researchers. This ease of access should not obscure the difficulty of interpretation of HRV findings that can be easily misconstrued, however this can be controlled to some extent through correct methodological processes. Standards of measurement were developed two decades ago by a Task Force within HRV research, and recent reviews updated several aspects of the Task Force paper. However, many methodological aspects related to HRV in psychophysiological research have to be considered if one aims to be able to draw sound conclusions, which makes it difficult to interpret findings and to compare results across laboratories. Those methodological issues have mainly been discussed in separate outlets, making difficult to get a grasp on them, and thus this paper aims to address this issue. It will help to provide psychophysiological researchers with recommendations and practical advice concerning experimental designs, data analysis, and data reporting. This will ensure that researchers starting a project with HRV and cardiac vagal tone are well informed regarding methodological considerations in order for their findings to contribute to knowledge advancement in their field.

1,096 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The results confirm the persistent problems of Romance learners of Dutch with online gender processing and show that they cannot be overcome by reducing task demands related to the modality of stimulus presentation.
Abstract: Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) can reveal online processing differences between native speakers and second language (L2) learners during language comprehension. Using the P600 as a measure of native-likeness, we investigated processing of grammatical gender agreement in highly proficient immersed Romance L2 learners of Dutch. We demonstrate that these late learners consistently fail to show native-like sensitivity to gender violations. This appears to be due to a combination of differences from the gender marking in their L1 and the relatively opaque Dutch gender system. We find that L2 use predicts the effect magnitude of non-finite verb violations, a relatively regular and transparent construction, but not that of gender agreement violations. There were no effects of age of acquisition, length of residence, proficiency or offline gender knowledge. Additionally, a within-subject comparison of stimulus modalities (written vs. auditory) shows that immersed learners may show some of the effects only in the auditory modality; in non-finite verb violations, an early native-like N400 was only present for auditory stimuli. However, modality failed to influence the response to gender. Taken together, the results confirm the persistent problems of Romance learners of Dutch with online gender processing and show that they cannot be overcome by reducing task demands related to the modality of stimulus presentation.

1,059 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20233,166
20228,548
20215,578
20203,788
20192,980
20182,715