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Reference BookDOI

Geospatial Technology for Water Resource Applications

TL;DR: In this article, the authors provide a summary of different research work carried out in various fields of water resources with demonstrated results and findings that could be able to use in decision making, developing policy and planning at root level.
Abstract: Increasing demands on water resources to fulfill the growing population needs have led to a great pressure on the water resources. Water resources conservation and management needs exemplary information regarding the water bodies with respect to quality, quantity and the related driving factors responsible for deterioration and depletion of water. Traditional methods existing in literature are limited to the point locations and manually gathered input dataset for analysis of the water system. However, after the development of advance geospatial technologies, now it is possible to build the digital information that can support analysis and interpretation for a large area in short span of time. The chapter introduces the various geospatial technologies, which are playing a vital and inevitable role in the acquisition of information and development of research capabilities towards water resources. These technologies are required for determining a strategic plan for execution of desired results as applicable to different regions and objectives (for e.g. determination of water-river boundaries, water quality and quantity, soil moisture, flood plains, ocean temperature etc). This chapter provides different methods/applications to demonstrate the importance of traditional and advanced concepts of geospatial technology in water resources. Thus, overall goal 1 Centre for Landscape and Climate Research, Department of Geography, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. 2 Hydrological Sciences, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USA. 3 Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, Maryland, USA. 4 Institute of Environmental and Sustainable Development, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. 5 Department of Remote Sensing, Banasthali University, Newai, Tonk, Rajasthan, India. 6 Water and Environmental Management Research Centre, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. * Corresponding author: prashant.just@gmail.com D ow nl oa de d by [ U ni ve rs ity o f T ok yo ] at 0 0: 59 0 4 A pr il 20 17 4 Geospatial Technology for Water Resource Applications of this chapter is to provide a summary of different research work carried out in various fields of water resources with demonstrated results and findings that could be able to use in decision making, developing policy and planning at root level. This chapter also provides future challenges in water resources and geospatial technology.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors compared the performance of three satellite precipitation products (GSMaP, IMERG, and CHIRPS) over Bali Island from 2015 to 2017 in terms of ground rain gauge data over a high density of rain gauge stations (27 in-situ rain gauges) and at various elevations, rainfall intensities, and temporal scales.

67 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present study investigates the performance of the SMAP L4 SM product at selected experimental sites across four continents, namely North America, Europe, Asia and Australia, and furnishes an independent verification of this global product.
Abstract: Space-borne soil moisture (SM) satellite products such as those available from Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) offer unique opportunities for global and frequent monitoring of SM and also to understand its spatiotemporal variability The present study investigates the performance of the SMAP L4 SM product at selected experimental sites across four continents, namely North America, Europe, Asia and Australia This product provides global scale SM estimates at 9 km × 9 km spatial resolution at daily intervals For the product evaluation, co-orbital in situ SM measurements were used, acquired at 14 test sites in North America, Europe, and Australia belonging to the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) and local networks in India The satellite SM estimates of up to 0–5 cm soil layer were compared against collocated ground measurements using a series of statistical scores Overall, the best performance of the SMAP product was found in North America (RMSE = 005 m3/m3) followed by Australia (RMSE = 008 m3/m3), Asia (RMSE = 009 m3/m3) and Europe (RMSE = 014 m3/m3) Our findings provide important insights into the spatiotemporal variability of the specific operational SM product in different ecosystems and environments This study also furnishes an independent verification of this global product, which is of international interest given its suitability for a wide range of practical and research applications

15 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
11 Mar 2020
TL;DR: In this article, the authors combine multivariate techniques, Geographic Information System (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) in order to delineate potential zones for groundwater storage in the Nekor Basin which covers an area of 905 Km2.
Abstract: The scarcity of precipitation in the semi-arid regions due to climate change makes the assessment of groundwater potential zones (GWPZ) a very crucial process in order to mitigate the lack of potable water in the study area. Therefore, this study aims to combine multivariate techniques, Geographic Information System (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) in order to delineate potential zones for groundwater storage in the Nekor Basin which covers an area of 905 Km2. Thence, the thematic layers, known of high importance in the demarcation of groundwater potential zones such as Elevation, Geology, Rainfall, Land Use/Land Cover, Drainage Density, Slope, Lineament Density, Curvature, Roughness, Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) and Topographic Position Index (TPI) were all used in the current study. Weights were assigned for all thematic layers using pairwise comparison as an AHP approach. The GIS-based analysis has revealed 15.56% and 63.95% of poor and moderate groundwater potential zones, respectively. Areas with good and very good groundwater potential were reported only in 20.48% of the basin. The results of the delineation study were validated with the hydrogeological map of the Nekor basin and the groundwater flow of six boreholes and one spring located all in the Ghiss-Nekor Aquifer. As a result, the comparison has shown a reasonable concordance with the groundwater potential zones classes obtained in the present study.

12 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors evaluated irrigation water quality in the Danube-Tisa-Danube hydrosystem area (Vojvodina, northern Serbia) using data from 40 surface water and 23 groundwater quality monitoring locations.
Abstract: The study evaluates irrigation water quality in the Danube-Tisa-Danube hydrosystem area (Vojvodina, northern Serbia). The area is dominantly a plain with about 75% arable land, suitable for agricultural production and irrigation. Use of water of inadequate quality can have long-term effects on irrigated land and affect the yield of cultivated crops. The analyses included data from 40 surface water and 23 groundwater quality monitoring locations, observed during the period 2013–2018. The average annual values of the concentrations of major cations and anions and of electrical conductivity in surface and groundwater were comparatively analyzed. These values were statistically significantly higher (by p < 0.05) in groundwater bodies with most of the analyzed parameters. Hydrochemical classification of water types shows that 95% of surface and 87% of groundwater locations belong to the Ca·Mg–HCO3 water type. Water suitability for irrigation was assessed using specific parameters and indices (sodium adsorption ratio, Na%, residual sodium carbonate, magnesium hazard, permeability index, and Kelly’s index). The results showed that surface and groundwater resources are generally of good quality and suitable for irrigation, with sporadic deviations at several locations. The principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify the most important variables affecting the chemical composition of the analyzed waters and group the monitoring locations by their chemical characteristics. The spatial variation of the analyzed water quality indices was shown on thematic maps.

7 citations

Trending Questions (1)
How can geospatial analysis be used to better understand water dynamics?

Geospatial analysis can be used to understand water dynamics by providing information on water quality, quantity, and related driving factors responsible for water deterioration and depletion.