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Author

Jean-Yves Girard

Bio: Jean-Yves Girard is an academic researcher from Centre national de la recherche scientifique. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Linear logic & Sequent calculus. The author has an hindex of 31, co-authored 59 publication(s) receiving 10720 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Jean-Yves Girard include University of the Mediterranean & University of Paris.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
30 Jan 1987

3,829 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
Abstract: Sense, denotation and semantics natural deduction the Curry-Howard isomorphism the normalisation theorem Godel's system T coherence spaces denotational semantics of T sums in natural deduction system F coherence semantics of the sum cut elimination (Hauptsatz) strong normalisation for F representation theorem semantics of System F what is linear logic?

1,741 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jun 1995
TL;DR: The first objection to that view is that there are in mathematics, in real life, cases where reaction does not exist or can be neglected : think of a lemma which is forever true, or of a Mr. Soros, who has almost an infinite amount of dollars.
Abstract: This is perfect in mathematics, but wrong in real life, since real implication is causal. A causal implication cannot be iterated since the conditions are modified after its use ; this process of modification of the premises (conditions) is known in physics as reaction. For instance, if A is to spend $1 on a pack of cigarettes and B is to get them, you lose $1 in this process, and you cannot do it a second time. The reaction here was that $1 went out of your pocket. The first objection to that view is that there are in mathematics, in real life, cases where reaction does not exist or can be neglected : think of a lemma which is forever true, or of a Mr. Soros, who has almost an infinite amount of dollars.

436 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Introduction: Elementary Proof Theory. The Fall of Hilbert's Program. Hilbert's Program. Recursive Functions. The First Incompleteness Theorem. The Second Incompleteness Theorem. Exercises. Annex: Intuitionism. Part I: Sigma 0 1 Proof Theory. The Calculus of Sequents. Definitions. Completeness of the Sequent Calculus. The Cut-Elimination Theorem. The Subformula Property. Intuitionistic Sequent Calculus. Herbrand's Theorem. Generalization. Annex: Natural Deduction. The Church-Rosser Property. Strong Normalization. The Semantics of Sequent Calculus. Completeness of the Cut-Free Rules. Three-Valued Models. Three-Valued Logic. Annex: Takeuti's Conjecture. Limitations of Takeuti's Conjecture. Three-Valued Equivalence. Cut-Free Analysis. Three-Valued Semantics and Generalized Logics. Applications of the ``Hauptsatz''. The Interpolation Lemma. The Reflection Schema of PA. Elementary Consistency Proofs. 1-Consistency. Annex: The Hauptsatz in a Concrete Case. Normalization in HA. Normalization for NL 2 J. Part II: Pi 1 1 Proof Theory. Pi 1 1 Formulas and Well-Foundedness. The Projective Hierarchy. Well-Founded Trees. Well-Orders. Equivalents of (Sigma 0 1 -CA * ). Recursive Well-Orders. Hyperarithmetical Sets. Annex: Kleene's 0. Hierarchies Indexed by 0. Paths Through 0. The Classification Problem. The omega-Rule. omega-Logic. The Cut-Elimination Theorem. Bounds for Cut-Elimination. Equivalents for (Sigma 0 1 -CA * ). Annex: The Calculus Lomega 1 omega. Cut-Elimination in Lomega 1 omega. The Ordinal epsilon o and Arithmetic. Ordinal Analysis of PA. Extensions to other Systems. Ordinals and Theories. Annex: Godel's System T. Functional Interpretation. Spector's Interpretation. No Conterexample Interpretation. An Application. Bibliography. Analytical Index.

395 citations


Cited by
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Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: This text provides a comprehensive introduction both to type systems in computer science and to the basic theory of programming languages, with a variety of approaches to modeling the features of object-oriented languages.
Abstract: A type system is a syntactic method for automatically checking the absence of certain erroneous behaviors by classifying program phrases according to the kinds of values they compute. The study of type systems -- and of programming languages from a type-theoretic perspective -- has important applications in software engineering, language design, high-performance compilers, and security.This text provides a comprehensive introduction both to type systems in computer science and to the basic theory of programming languages. The approach is pragmatic and operational; each new concept is motivated by programming examples and the more theoretical sections are driven by the needs of implementations. Each chapter is accompanied by numerous exercises and solutions, as well as a running implementation, available via the Web. Dependencies between chapters are explicitly identified, allowing readers to choose a variety of paths through the material.The core topics include the untyped lambda-calculus, simple type systems, type reconstruction, universal and existential polymorphism, subtyping, bounded quantification, recursive types, kinds, and type operators. Extended case studies develop a variety of approaches to modeling the features of object-oriented languages.

2,297 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This column presents an intuitive overview of linear logic, some recent theoretical results, and summarizes several applications oflinear logic to computer science.
Abstract: Linear logic was introduced by Girard in 1987 [11] . Since then many results have supported Girard' s statement, \"Linear logic is a resource conscious logic,\" and related slogans . Increasingly, computer scientists have come to recognize linear logic as an expressive and powerful logic with connection s to a variety of topics in computer science . This column presents a.n intuitive overview of linear logic, some recent theoretical results, an d summarizes several applications of linear logic to computer science . Other introductions to linear logic may be found in [12, 361 .

2,199 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A λ-calculus-based model for type systems that allows us to explore the interaction among the concepts of type, data abstraction, and polymorphism in a simple setting, unencumbered by complexities of production programming languages is developed.
Abstract: Our objective is to understand the notion of type in programming languages, present a model of typed, polymorphic programming languages that reflects recent research in type theory, and examine the relevance of recent research to the design of practical programming languages.Object-oriented languages provide both a framework and a motivation for exploring the interaction among the concepts of type, data abstraction, and polymorphism, since they extend the notion of type to data abstraction and since type inheritance is an important form of polymorphism. We develop a l-calculus-based model for type systems that allows us to explore these interactions in a simple setting, unencumbered by complexities of production programming languages.The evolution of languages from untyped universes to monomorphic and then polymorphic type systems is reviewed. Mechanisms for polymorphism such as overloading, coercion, subtyping, and parameterization are examined. A unifying framework for polymorphic type systems is developed in terms of the typed l-calculus augmented to include binding of types by quantification as well as binding of values by abstraction.The typed l-calculus is augmented by universal quantification to model generic functions with type parameters, existential quantification and packaging (information hiding) to model abstract data types, and bounded quantification to model subtypes and type inheritance. In this way we obtain a simple and precise characterization of a powerful type system that includes abstract data types, parametric polymorphism, and multiple inheritance in a single consistent framework. The mechanisms for type checking for the augmented l-calculus are discussed.The augmented typed l-calculus is used as a programming language for a variety of illustrative examples. We christen this language Fun because fun instead of l is the functional abstraction keyword and because it is pleasant to deal with.Fun is mathematically simple and can serve as a basis for the design and implementation of real programming languages with type facilities that are more powerful and expressive than those of existing programming languages. In particular, it provides a basis for the design of strongly typed object-oriented languages.

1,847 citations

Book
01 Jan 1989
Abstract: Sense, denotation and semantics natural deduction the Curry-Howard isomorphism the normalisation theorem Godel's system T coherence spaces denotational semantics of T sums in natural deduction system F coherence semantics of the sum cut elimination (Hauptsatz) strong normalisation for F representation theorem semantics of System F what is linear logic?

1,741 citations

Book
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Researchers from other fields should find in this handbook an effective way to learn about constraint programming and to possibly use some of the constraint programming concepts and techniques in their work, thus providing a means for a fruitful cross-fertilization among different research areas.
Abstract: Constraint programming is a powerful paradigm for solving combinatorial search problems that draws on a wide range of techniques from artificial intelligence, computer science, databases, programming languages, and operations research. Constraint programming is currently applied with success to many domains, such as scheduling, planning, vehicle routing, configuration, networks, and bioinformatics. The aim of this handbook is to capture the full breadth and depth of the constraint programming field and to be encyclopedic in its scope and coverage. While there are several excellent books on constraint programming, such books necessarily focus on the main notions and techniques and cannot cover also extensions, applications, and languages. The handbook gives a reasonably complete coverage of all these lines of work, based on constraint programming, so that a reader can have a rather precise idea of the whole field and its potential. Of course each line of work is dealt with in a survey-like style, where some details may be neglected in favor of coverage. However, the extensive bibliography of each chapter will help the interested readers to find suitable sources for the missing details. Each chapter of the handbook is intended to be a self-contained survey of a topic, and is written by one or more authors who are leading researchers in the area. The intended audience of the handbook is researchers, graduate students, higher-year undergraduates and practitioners who wish to learn about the state-of-the-art in constraint programming. No prior knowledge about the field is necessary to be able to read the chapters and gather useful knowledge. Researchers from other fields should find in this handbook an effective way to learn about constraint programming and to possibly use some of the constraint programming concepts and techniques in their work, thus providing a means for a fruitful cross-fertilization among different research areas. The handbook is organized in two parts. The first part covers the basic foundations of constraint programming, including the history, the notion of constraint propagation, basic search methods, global constraints, tractability and computational complexity, and important issues in modeling a problem as a constraint problem. The second part covers constraint languages and solver, several useful extensions to the basic framework (such as interval constraints, structured domains, and distributed CSPs), and successful application areas for constraint programming. - Covers the whole field of constraint programming - Survey-style chapters - Five chapters on applications Table of Contents Foreword (Ugo Montanari) Part I : Foundations Chapter 1. Introduction (Francesca Rossi, Peter van Beek, Toby Walsh) Chapter 2. Constraint Satisfaction: An Emerging Paradigm (Eugene C. Freuder, Alan K. Mackworth) Chapter 3. Constraint Propagation (Christian Bessiere) Chapter 4. Backtracking Search Algorithms (Peter van Beek) Chapter 5. Local Search Methods (Holger H. Hoos, Edward Tsang) Chapter 6. Global Constraints (Willem-Jan van Hoeve, Irit Katriel) Chapter 7. Tractable Structures for CSPs (Rina Dechter) Chapter 8. The Complexity of Constraint Languages (David Cohen, Peter Jeavons) Chapter 9. Soft Constraints (Pedro Meseguer, Francesca Rossi, Thomas Schiex) Chapter 10. Symmetry in Constraint Programming (Ian P. Gent, Karen E. Petrie, Jean-Francois Puget) Chapter 11. Modelling (Barbara M. Smith) Part II : Extensions, Languages, and Applications Chapter 12. Constraint Logic Programming (Kim Marriott, Peter J. Stuckey, Mark Wallace) Chapter 13. Constraints in Procedural and Concurrent Languages (Thom Fruehwirth, Laurent Michel, Christian Schulte) Chapter 14. Finite Domain Constraint Programming Systems (Christian Schulte, Mats Carlsson) Chapter 15. Operations Research Methods in Constraint Programming (John Hooker) Chapter 16. Continuous and Interval Constraints(Frederic Benhamou, Laurent Granvilliers) Chapter 17. Constraints over Structured Domains (Carmen Gervet) Chapter 18. Randomness and Structure (Carla Gomes, Toby Walsh) Chapter 19. Temporal CSPs (Manolis Koubarakis) Chapter 20. Distributed Constraint Programming (Boi Faltings) Chapter 21. Uncertainty and Change (Kenneth N. Brown, Ian Miguel) Chapter 22. Constraint-Based Scheduling and Planning (Philippe Baptiste, Philippe Laborie, Claude Le Pape, Wim Nuijten) Chapter 23. Vehicle Routing (Philip Kilby, Paul Shaw) Chapter 24. Configuration (Ulrich Junker) Chapter 25. Constraint Applications in Networks (Helmut Simonis) Chapter 26. Bioinformatics and Constraints (Rolf Backofen, David Gilbert)

1,472 citations