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Author

Joel H. Ferziger

Other affiliations: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Bio: Joel H. Ferziger is an academic researcher from Stanford University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Turbulence & Large eddy simulation. The author has an hindex of 50, co-authored 196 publications receiving 20661 citations. Previous affiliations of Joel H. Ferziger include University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1996
TL;DR: This text develops and applies the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice, including advanced techniques in computational fluid dynamics.
Abstract: Preface. Basic Concepts of Fluid Flow.- Introduction to Numerical Methods.- Finite Difference Methods.- Finite Volume Methods.- Solution of Linear Equation Systems.- Methods for Unsteady Problems.- Solution of the Navier-Stokes Equations.- Complex Geometries.- Turbulent Flows.- Compressible Flow.- Efficiency and Accuracy Improvement. Special Topics.- Appendeces.

7,066 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new numerical method for improving the mass conservation properties of the level set method when the interface is passively advected in a flow field that compares favorably with volume of fluid methods in the conservation of mass and purely Lagrangian schemes for interface resolution.

1,120 citations

01 Jul 1980
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyzed models for subgrid-scale turbulence and showed that the kinetic energy of small-scale motions can be decomposed into two parts: one results from the large scales and is correlated with them, and the other part is uncorrelated which leads to a two-component eddy-viscosity model.
Abstract: The paper analyzes models for subgrid-scale turbulence. The analysis indicates that there is sufficient information in the resolved scales to determine some characteristics of the complete flow field. The kinetic energy of the small-scale motions can be decomposed into two parts: one results from the large scales and is correlated with them, and the other part is uncorrelated which leads to a two-component eddy-viscosity model. The 'production equals dissipation' argument does not apply to the small scales in the decay of turbulence because it does not account for the uncorrelated component. The exchange between the large and small scales takes place mainly between the smallest scales of the former and the largest scales of the latter; this argument is the basis of a new model shown to be superior to the Smagorinsky model (1963).

891 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, periodic homogeneous isotropic turbulence is used to simulate the experimental decay of grid turbulence and the computed flow field is then treated as a realization of a physical turbulent flow.
Abstract: A calculation of periodic homogeneous isotropic turbulence is used to simulate the experimental decay of grid turbulence. The calculation is found to match the experiment in a number of important aspects and the computed flow field is then treated as a realization of a physical turbulent flow. From this flow, a calculation is conducted of the large eddy field and the various averages of the subgrid-scale turbulence that occur in the large eddy simulation equations. These quantities are compared with the predictions of the models that are usually applied in large eddy simulation. The results show that the terms which involve the large-scale field are accurately modeled but the subgrid-scale Reynolds stresses are only moderately well modeled. It is also possible to use the method to predict the constants of the models without reference to experiment. Attempts to find improved models have not met with success.

833 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new eddy viscosity model is presented which alleviates many of the drawbacks of the existing subgrid-scale stress models, such as the inability to represent correctly with a single universal constant different turbulent fields in rotating or sheared flows, near solid walls, or in transitional regimes.
Abstract: One major drawback of the eddy viscosity subgrid‐scale stress models used in large‐eddy simulations is their inability to represent correctly with a single universal constant different turbulent fields in rotating or sheared flows, near solid walls, or in transitional regimes. In the present work a new eddy viscosity model is presented which alleviates many of these drawbacks. The model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model is based on an algebraic identity between the subgrid‐scale stresses at two different filtered levels and the resolved turbulent stresses. The subgrid‐scale stresses obtained using the proposed model vanish in laminar flow and at a solid boundary, and have the correct asymptotic behavior in the near‐wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. The results of large‐eddy simulations of transitional and turbulent channel flow that use the proposed model are in good agreement with the direct simulation data.

6,747 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a new k -ϵ eddy viscosity model, which consists of a new model dissipation rate equation and a new realizable eddy viscous formulation, is proposed.

4,648 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: Spectral methods have been widely used in simulation of stability, transition, and turbulence as discussed by the authors, and their applications to both compressible and incompressible flows, to viscous as well as inviscid flows, and also to chemically reacting flows are surveyed.
Abstract: Fundamental aspects of spectral methods are introduced. Recent developments in spectral methods are reviewed with an emphasis on collocation techniques. Their applications to both compressible and incompressible flows, to viscous as well as inviscid flows, and also to chemically reacting flows are surveyed. The key role that these methods play in the simulation of stability, transition, and turbulence is brought out. A perspective is provided on some of the obstacles that prohibit a wider use of these methods, and how these obstacles are being overcome.

4,632 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The implementation of various types of turbulence modeling in a FOAM computational-fluid-dynamics code is discussed, and calculations performed on a standard test case, that of flow around a square prism, are presented.
Abstract: In this article the principles of the field operation and manipulation (FOAM) C++ class library for continuum mechanics are outlined. Our intention is to make it as easy as possible to develop reliable and efficient computational continuum-mechanics codes: this is achieved by making the top-level syntax of the code as close as possible to conventional mathematical notation for tensors and partial differential equations. Object-orientation techniques enable the creation of data types that closely mimic those of continuum mechanics, and the operator overloading possible in C++ allows normal mathematical symbols to be used for the basic operations. As an example, the implementation of various types of turbulence modeling in a FOAM computational-fluid-dynamics code is discussed, and calculations performed on a standard test case, that of flow around a square prism, are presented. To demonstrate the flexibility of the FOAM library, codes for solving structures and magnetohydrodynamics are also presented with appropriate test case results given. © 1998 American Institute of Physics.

3,987 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a two-equation model and Reynolds stress transport model are developed for turbulent shear flows and tested for homogeneous shear flow and flow over a backward facing step.
Abstract: Turbulence models are developed by supplementing the renormalization group (RNG) approach of Yakhot and Orszag [J. Sci. Comput. 1, 3 (1986)] with scale expansions for the Reynolds stress and production of dissipation terms. The additional expansion parameter (η≡SK/■) is the ratio of the turbulent to mean strain time scale. While low‐order expansions appear to provide an adequate description for the Reynolds stress, no finite truncation of the expansion for the production of dissipation term in powers of η suffices−terms of all orders must be retained. Based on these ideas, a new two‐equation model and Reynolds stress transport model are developed for turbulent shear flows. The models are tested for homogeneous shear flow and flow over a backward facing step. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental data are excellent.

2,347 citations