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Witold Prendota

Bio: Witold Prendota is an academic researcher from AGH University of Science and Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Intermetallic & Sintering. The author has an hindex of 3, co-authored 6 publications receiving 114 citations.

Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The obtained materials can be considered as highly effective contrast agents for low-field MRI, particularly useful at permanent magnet-based scanners.
Abstract: Dual-mode MRI contrast agents consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) cores and gadolinium ions associated with the ionic chitosan protecting layer were synthesized and studied. Gadolinium ions were introduced into the coating layer via direct complex formation on the nanoparticles surface, covalent attachment or electrostatically driven deposition of the preformed Gd complex. The modified SPIONs having hydrodynamic diameters ca. 100 nm form stable, well-defined dispersions in water and have excellent magnetic properties. Physiochemical properties of those new materials were characterized using e.g., FTIR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray fluorescence, TEM, and vibrating sample magnetometry. They behave as superparamagnetics and shorten both T1 and T2 proton relaxation times, thus influencing both r1 and r2 relaxivity values that reach 53.7 and 375.5 mM−1 s−1, respectively, at 15 MHz. The obtained materials can be considered as highly effective contrast agents for low-field MRI, particularly useful at permanent magnet-based scanners.

102 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a study of Ti3AlC2 materials prepared with Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis (SHS) method followed by uniaxial hot pressing (HP) is presented.

22 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used strontium ferrite as a filler to study the evolution of the filler particles distribution in the fluid before curing, and they showed that with increasing magnetic field these structures are characterized by longer chains, higher speed of particles displacement and stronger structural anisotropy.

11 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of carbon addition on properties of the Fe-Mn-Si type intelligent materials with basic composition of Fe64Mn30Si6 (wt. %).
Abstract: The study presented is focused on the influence of carbon addition on properties of the Fe-Mn-Si type intelligent materials with basic composition of Fe64Mn30Si6 (wt. %). Three alloys were prepared, starting from elemental powders, with 0, 0.1, and 0.3 wt. % of carbon, at corresponding silicon content reduction. For the synthesis, the mechanical alloying, sintering, and annealing were applied. Further process involved deformation and subsequent heating in a furnace. High temperature X-ray diffraction patterns, obtained at room temperature and up to 600°C, showed evolution of α′, γ, and e phase peaks. The study revealed that a small carbon addition (of 0.1 wt. %), could increase shape recovery stress, even up to 1.8% after one cycle of training. The higher carbon content leads to a deterioration of the property. Also, relative density differences are observed between the sintered Fe64Mn30Si6 (wt. %) alloys with before/after annealing with/without mechanical alloying involvement.

3 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a uniform nickel coating of hydride powder by magnetron sputtering can be considered as an effective way for introduction of the catalytic elements and improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of the magnesium hydrides.

3 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The synthesis, surface functionalization and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles, as well as their (pre‐) clinical use in diagnostic, therapeutic and theranostic settings, are summarized.

618 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The main goal of this paper is to present the basic properties of SPIONs, to discuss their current role in medicine, and to review their applications in order to inspire future developments of new, improved SPION systems.
Abstract: The recent, fast development of nanotechnology is reflected in the medical sciences. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an excellent example. Thanks to their superparamagnetic properties, SPIONs have found application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and magnetic hyperthermia. Unlike bulk iron, SPIONs do not have remnant magnetization in the absence of the external magnetic field; therefore, a precise remote control over their action is possible. This makes them also useful as a component of the advanced drug delivery systems. Due to their easy synthesis, biocompatibility, multifunctionality, and possibility of further surface modification with various chemical agents, SPIONs could support many fields of medicine. SPIONs have also some disadvantages, such as their high uptake by macrophages. Nevertheless, based on the ongoing studies, they seem to be very promising in oncological therapy (especially in the brain, breast, prostate, and pancreatic tumors). The main goal of our paper is, therefore, to present the basic properties of SPIONs, to discuss their current role in medicine, and to review their applications in order to inspire future developments of new, improved SPION systems.

309 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss several key aspects regarding this newly developed contrast agent, including synthetic strategies, parameters affecting T1 signal (e.g., size, surface, and environment), and emerging applications.
Abstract: Ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles have recently attracted much attention as T1 (positive) contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to serve as safer alternatives to gadolinium-based T1 contrast agents. This review will discuss several key aspects regarding this newly developed contrast agent, including synthetic strategies, parameters affecting T1 signal (e.g., size, surface, and environment), and emerging applications. The integration with other imaging modalities will be discussed as well, such as dual T1/T2 imaging, positron emission tomography, and computed tomography. Finally, perspectives and outlook about the future development and concerns will be included.

148 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
14 Jun 2018-Small
TL;DR: Methods to chemically modify the surface of diamonds and the different hurdles one has to overcome when working with cells, such as entering the cells and biocompatibility, are described.
Abstract: Diamonds owe their fame to a unique set of outstanding properties. They combine a high refractive index, hardness, great stability and inertness, and low electrical but high thermal conductivity. Diamond defects have recently attracted a lot of attention. Given this unique list of properties, it is not surprising that diamond nanoparticles are utilized for numerous applications. Due to their hardness, they are routinely used as abrasives. Their small and uniform size qualifies them as attractive carriers for drug delivery. The stable fluorescence of diamond defects allows their use as stable single photon sources or biolabels. The magnetic properties of the defects make them stable spin qubits in quantum information. This property also allows their use as a sensor for temperature, magnetic fields, electric fields, or strain. This Review focuses on applications in cells. Different diamond materials and the special requirements for the respective applications are discussed. Methods to chemically modify the surface of diamonds and the different hurdles one has to overcome when working with cells, such as entering the cells and biocompatibility, are described. Finally, the recent developments and applications in labeling, sensing, drug delivery, theranostics, antibiotics, and tissue engineering are critically discussed.

140 citations