Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format
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Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format
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Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format Example of Archives of Disease in Childhood format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 39888 e-ISSN: 14682044

Archives of Disease in Childhood — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health #41 of 294 down down by 19 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 856 Published Papers | 3892 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 13/06/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

3.041

4% from 2018

Impact factor for Archives of Disease in Childhood from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.041
2018 3.158
2017 3.258
2016 3.265
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 4% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

4.5

4% from 2019

CiteRatio for Archives of Disease in Childhood from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 4.5
2019 4.7
2018 5.5
2017 5.3
2016 5.1
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.037

2% from 2019

SJR for Archives of Disease in Childhood from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.037
2019 1.06
2018 1.303
2017 1.322
2016 1.478
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.636

4% from 2019

SNIP for Archives of Disease in Childhood from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.636
2019 1.572
2018 1.539
2017 1.697
2016 1.666
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Archives of Disease in Childhood

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BMJ Publishing Group

Archives of Disease in Childhood

Archives of Disease in Childhood is an international peer review journal that aims to keep paediatricians and others up to date with advances in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood diseases as well as advocacy issues such as child protection. It focuses on all aspects of ...... Read More

Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Medicine

i
Last updated on
12 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0003-9888
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.532
i
Acceptance Rate
22%
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
unsrt
i
Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
C. W. J. Beenakker. Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys. Rev. Lett., 97(6):067007, 2006.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/ADC.44.235.291
Variations in pattern of pubertal changes in girls.

Abstract:

In Great Britain some girls begin to menstruate in their 10th or 11th years, while others who are equally healthy may not experience menarche until they 'are 14, 15, or even older. Menarche is, however, only a single event in the combination of physical changes which constitute puberty. The adolescent growth spurt, the develo... In Great Britain some girls begin to menstruate in their 10th or 11th years, while others who are equally healthy may not experience menarche until they 'are 14, 15, or even older. Menarche is, however, only a single event in the combination of physical changes which constitute puberty. The adolescent growth spurt, the development of the breasts, and the growth of the pubic hair occur more or less concurrently, and take, on the average, about 3 years from beginning to completion, with menarche occurring usually in the latter half of this period (Tanner, 1962). At present we lack detailed information about the rate at which girls progress through the stages of puberty and about the relation of one event to another. Only longitudinal studies (i.e. studies in which the same individuals are examined repeatedly over a period of time) can provide this information, which would be helpful both to the clinician in distinguishing the normal from the abnormal, and to the neuro-endocrinologist in constructing hypotheses about the mechanisms by which puberty is controlled. Present knowledge is based on studies carried out on small numbers of children in the United States a generation ago, together with some German studies of a similar period (for literature see Tanner, 1962). The only recent European study in which the events of puberty have been followed longitudinally is the Harpenden Growth Study, which began 19 years ago in England and is still in progress. Anthropometric measurements have been taken, and the development of the breasts and pubic hair have been recorded photographically at 3monthly intervals throughout puberty. Though these data may be subject to certain biases, discussed below, they provide information available from no other source. This paper describes the extent of normal individual variation observed in the events of puberty among the girls of the Harpenden Growth Study. We discuss: (a) variation in the chrono- read more read less

Topics:

Pubertal stage (63%)63% related to the paper
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4,647 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/ADC.45.239.13
Variations in the Pattern of Pubertal Changes in Boys

Abstract:

Mixed longitudinal data on the physical changes at puberty in 228 normal boys are presented together with normal standards for stages of genital and pubic hair development. The genitalia began to develop between the ages 9½ years and 13½ years in 95% of boys (mean = 11.6 ± 0.09) and reached maturity at ages varying between 13... Mixed longitudinal data on the physical changes at puberty in 228 normal boys are presented together with normal standards for stages of genital and pubic hair development. The genitalia began to develop between the ages 9½ years and 13½ years in 95% of boys (mean = 11.6 ± 0.09) and reached maturity at ages varying between 13 and 17 (mean = 14.9 ± 1.10). The age at which pubic hair first appeared was not accurately determined, but its development through the later stages was studied. It reached the equivalent of an adult female distribution at a mean age of 15.2 ± 0.01 years. On average the genitalia reached the adult stage 3.0 years after they first began to develop; but some boys completed this development in as little as 1.8 years while others took as much as 4.7 years. Some boys complete the whole process in less time than others take to go from Stage G2 to Stage G3. The genitalia begin to develop before pubic hair is visible in photographs in practically all boys. The 41 boys in whom it could be studied reached their maximum rate of growth (peak height velocity) at a mean age of 14.1 ± 0.14 years. Very few boys (about 5%) reached peak height velocity before their genitalia were in Stage 4 and over 20% did not do so until their genitalia were adult. Peak height velocity is reached, on the average, nearly 2 years later in boys than in girls, but the boys9 genitalia begin to develop only about 6 months later than the girls9 breasts. Pubic hair appears about 1½ years later in boys than in girls. read more read less

Topics:

Spermarche (54%)54% related to the paper, Pubic hair (53%)53% related to the paper, Human puberty (52%)52% related to the paper, Adult stage (50%)50% related to the paper, Pubarche (50%)50% related to the paper
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4,153 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/ADC.51.3.170
Clinical longitudinal standards for height, weight, height velocity, weight velocity, and stages of puberty.

Abstract:

New charts for height, weight, height velocity, and weight velocity are presented for clinical (as opposed to population survey) use. They are based on longitudinal-type growth curves, using the same data as in the British 1965 growth standards. In the velocity standards centiles are given for children who are early- and late... New charts for height, weight, height velocity, and weight velocity are presented for clinical (as opposed to population survey) use. They are based on longitudinal-type growth curves, using the same data as in the British 1965 growth standards. In the velocity standards centiles are given for children who are early- and late-maturing as well as for those who mature at the average age (thus extending the use of the previous charts). Limits of normality for the age of occurrence of the adolescent growth spurt are given and also for the successive stages of penis, testes, and pubic hair development in boys, and for stages of breast and pubic hair development in girls. read more read less

Topics:

Pubic hair (53%)53% related to the paper
View PDF
2,831 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/ADC.41.220.613
Standards from birth to maturity for height, weight, height velocity, and weight velocity: British children, 1965. II
J. M. Tanner, R. H. Whitehouse, M. Takaishi

Abstract:

(C) Whole-year Velocity Standards: Chronological Age-based and Individual Type We now consider how to construct velocity standards, to answer our second question 'Has this child's rate of growth been within normal limits ?' We are again confronted with the alternatives of plotting against chronological or developmental age at... (C) Whole-year Velocity Standards: Chronological Age-based and Individual Type We now consider how to construct velocity standards, to answer our second question 'Has this child's rate of growth been within normal limits ?' We are again confronted with the alternatives of plotting against chronological or developmental age at adolescence and we have adopted the same solution as before. First we give, in the conventional manner, centiles plotted against chronological age, over the whole age span. These are calculated simply from two measurements a year apart, without using further longitudinal data. They depend on a two-occasion longitudinal study, nothing further. At adolescence these standards are greatly scattered by the phase-difference effect. If we know nothing about a boy except that he is 12 years old and grew 3 cm. during the last year, we must plot 3 cm. at 11 * 5 years and interpret this according to the chronological age centiles. If, however, we know that he is midpubescent, or that his skeletal age is 14 * 0 years, then in theory we could make a more effective interpretation if we had the appropriate standards. We have to remember, however, that in one important respect velocity standards differ from distance ones. In velocity standards a child does not have the same strong tendency to stay in the same centile position from one age to another; there is always a contrary tendency to a move from the outer centile positions towards a more central position in the subsequent year. Though a child can follow the 60th or even 70th centile of velocity from the pre-school years till maturity and end up a large but normal adult, a child who follows the 97th centile read more read less
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2,425 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/ADC.73.1.25
Body mass index reference curves for the UK, 1990.
Tim J Cole, Jenny V Freeman, Michael A. Preece

Abstract:

Reference curves for stature and weight in British children have been available for the past 30 years, and have recently been updated. However weight by itself is a poor indicator of fatness or obesity, and there has never been a corresponding set of reference curves to assess weight for height. Body mass index (BMI) or weigh... Reference curves for stature and weight in British children have been available for the past 30 years, and have recently been updated. However weight by itself is a poor indicator of fatness or obesity, and there has never been a corresponding set of reference curves to assess weight for height. Body mass index (BMI) or weight/height has been popular for assessing obesity in adults for many years, but its use in children has developed only recently. Here centile curves for BMI in British children are presented, from birth to 23 years, based on the same large representative sample as used to update the stature and weight references. The charts were derived using Cole's LMS method, which adjusts the BMI distribution for skewness and allows BMI in individual subjects to be expressed as an exact centile or SD score. Use of the charts in clinical practice is aided by the provision of nine centiles, where the two extremes identify the fattest and thinnest four per 1000 of the population. read more read less

Topics:

Population (52%)52% related to the paper, Body mass index (51%)51% related to the paper
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1,944 Citations
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Archives of Disease in Childhood format uses unsrt citation style.

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Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Archives of Disease in Childhood citation style.

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One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Archives of Disease in Childhood's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

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To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
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  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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SciSpace would allow download of your references in Archives of Disease in Childhood Endnote style, according to bmj-publishing-group guidelines.

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