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JournalISSN: 0954-6553

Terrorism and Political Violence 

Taylor & Francis
About: Terrorism and Political Violence is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Terrorism & Political violence. It has an ISSN identifier of 0954-6553. Over the lifetime, 1564 publications have been published receiving 30317 citations. The journal is also known as: Terror. Political Violence.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors conceptualized political radicalization as a dimension of increasing extremity of beliefs, feelings, and behaviors in support of intergroup conflict and violence, and distinguished twelve mechanisms of radicalization across individuals, groups, and mass publics.
Abstract: This article conceptualizes political radicalization as a dimension of increasing extremity of beliefs, feelings, and behaviors in support of intergroup conflict and violence. Across individuals, groups, and mass publics, twelve mechanisms of radicalization are distinguished. For ten of these mechanisms, radicalization occurs in a context of group identification and reaction to perceived threat to the ingroup. The variety and strength of reactive mechanisms point to the need to understand radicalization—including the extremes of terrorism—as emerging more from the dynamics of intergroup conflict than from the vicissitudes of individual psychology.

762 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a series of multiple regression analyses on terrorist incidents and casualties in ninety-six countries from 1986 to 2002, the authors considered the significance of poverty, malnutrition, inequality, unemployment, inflation, and poor economic growth as predictors of terrorism, along with a variety of political and demographic control variables.
Abstract: This study evaluates the popular hypothesis that poverty, inequality, and poor economic development are root causes of terrorism. Employing a series of multiple regression analyses on terrorist incidents and casualties in ninety-six countries from 1986 to 2002, the study considers the significance of poverty, malnutrition, inequality, unemployment, inflation, and poor economic growth as predictors of terrorism, along with a variety of political and demographic control variables. The findings are that, contrary to popular opinion, no significant relationship between any of the measures of economic development and terrorism can be determined. Rather, variables such as population, ethno-religious diversity, increased state repression and, most significantly, the structure of party politics are found to be significant predictors of terrorism. The article concludes that “social cleavage theory” is better equipped to explain terrorism than are theories that link terrorism to poor economic development.

549 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Global Terrorism Database (GTD) is described, a previously unavailable open source data base that includes some 70,000 domestic and international incidents since 1970 is described and descriptive statistics on the contents of this new resource are provided.
Abstract: Compared to most types of criminal violence, terrorism poses special data collection challenges. In response, there has been growing interest in open source terrorist event data bases. One of the major problems with these data bases in the past is that they have been limited to international events—those involving a national or group of nationals from one country attacking targets physically located in another country. Past research shows that domestic incidents greatly outnumber international incidents. In this paper we describe a previously unavailable open source data base that includes some 70,000 domestic and international incidents since 1970. We began the Global Terrorism Database (GTD) by computerizing data originally collected by the Pinkerton Global Intelligence Service (PGIS). Following computerization, our research team has been working for the past two years to validate and extend the data to real time. In this paper, we describe our data collection efforts, the strengths and weaknesses of op...

547 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Mark Sedgwick1
TL;DR: The ubiquity of use of the term "radicalization" suggests a consensus about its meaning, but as mentioned in this paper shows through a review of a variety of definitions that no such consensus exists, and argues that use of "Radicalization" is problematic not just for these reasons, but because it is used in three different contexts: the security context, the integration context, and the foreign-policy context.
Abstract: The ubiquity of use of the term “radicalization” suggests a consensus about its meaning, but this article shows through a review of a variety of definitions that no such consensus exists. The article then argues that use of the term is problematic not just for these reasons, but because it is used in three different contexts: the security context, the integration context, and the foreign-policy context. It is argued that each of these contexts has a different agenda, impacted in the case of the integration agenda by the rise of European “neo-nationalism,” and so each uses the term “radical” to mean something different. The use of one term to denote at least three different concepts risks serious confusion. The proposed solution is to abandon the attempt to use “radicalization” as an absolute concept.

332 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The question of the linkage of democratic forms of government with the incidence of terrorist violence is explored in this paper, where evidence is presented clearly linking democracy with the presence of terrorist groups.
Abstract: The question of the linkage of democratic forms of government with the incidence of terrorist violence is explored. Distinguishing between the presence of terrorist groups in a nation and violent terrorist events, and using multiple indicators of democratic development, evidence is presented clearly linking democracy with the presence of terrorist groups. Terrorist groups are less likely to be found in non‐democratic settings than in democratic ones.

298 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202340
202289
202175
202087
201955
201840