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Journal ArticleDOI

A Comparison of Wrist and Hip Accelerometer Output at Different Walking Speeds: 2680 May 30, 2

01 May 2014-Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise-Vol. 46, pp 718-719

AboutThis article is published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise.The article was published on 2014-05-01 and is currently open access. It has received 1 citation(s) till now. The article focuses on the topic(s): Power walking & Preferred walking speed.

Topics: Power walking (69%), Preferred walking speed (56%)

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A Comparison of Wrist and Hip Accelerometer Output at Different A Comparison of Wrist and Hip Accelerometer Output at Different
Walking Speeds Walking Speeds
Albert R. Mendoza
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Et al.
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Mendoza AR, Hickey AM, Gruber AH, Staudenmayer J, Freedson PS. (2014). A Comparison of Wrist and
Hip Accelerometer Output at Different Walking Speeds. UMass Center for Clinical and Translational
Science Research Retreat. https://doi.org/10.13028/q4w9-p822. Retrieved from
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A Comparison of Wrist and Hip Accelerometer Output at Different Walking Speeds
Albert R. Mendoza
1
, Amanda M. Hickey
1
, Allison H. Gruber
1
,
John Staudenmayer
1
, Patty S. Freedson
1
, FACSM
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA
1
Physical activity has been objectively measured using hip-worn accelerometers for
decades. However, wrist-worn accelerometers are currently used in large-scale studies.
Differences in wrist and hip dynamics during locomotion may affect monitor output,
which may impact how prediction models are built.
PURPOSE: To compare ActiGraphwrist and hip accelerations (g’s) at varying
locomotion speeds. METHODS: Participants (N = 7) wore ActiGraphGT3X+
accelerometers on the dominant wrist and hip (sampling rate 80Hz). They performed
three 5-minute trials at self-paced (SP), slow (SL), and fast (F) over-ground walking
speeds. Mean and standard deviation of the vector magnitude (VM) were calculated
from two 20-s data windows per condition. Linear mixed-effects models were used to
determine if the relationship was different between speed and vector VM at the hip and
wrist. RESULTS: Significant differences were found between the slopes (speed vs VM)
of the hip m = 0.052 (95% CI: 0.033, 0.103) compared to the wrist m = 0.195 (95% CI:
0.160, 0.230) p<0.001.
DISCUSSION: The results show that ActiGraph™ wrist and hip accelerations (g’s) differ
at varying locomotion speeds. There is a curvilinear increase in VM at the wrist as
locomotion speed increases, whereas there is a linear increase in VM at the hip as
locomotion speed increases. The pattern of change of wrist VM is different and more
variable between subjects compared to hip VM, which may impact measurement error
and model development. Additionally, wrist VM is more responsive to changes in speed
than hip VM, suggesting that a wrist worn accelerometer may be more sensitive to
locomotion intensity.

Address for correspondence: Albert Mendoza, Department of Kinesiology, University of
Massachusetts Amherst, 162 Totman 30 Eastman Lane, Amherst, MA 01003. E-
mail:
amendoza@kin.umass.edu
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