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Book ChapterDOI

An Examination of Indian State in the Post-planning Period

01 Jan 2019-pp 57-79
TL;DR: The changing rationale and character of Indian state in the backdrop of the post-planning Indian economic transition is analyzed in this article, where it is argued that India state was both a creator of this triad and also the site of the combined effects of these nodes that pull and push it into contradictory directions.
Abstract: We seek to analyze the changing rationale and character of Indian state in the backdrop of the post-planning Indian economic transition. It is held that the Indian economy has transited into the triad of neoliberalism, global capitalism and inclusive development. It is argued that the India state was both a creator of this triad and also the site of the combined effects of these nodes that pull and push it into contradictory directions. In enacting these multiple roles, the Indian state is characterized by both benevolent and violent side of its existence in one turn. Its violent side is captured in terms of primitive accumulation and state of exception while the benevolent character through the social programs for the needy and in facilitating the process of nation building by way of creating human capital for capitalist-induced growth. The changing character and roles of Indian state in turn suggest a foundational displacement in the rationale of its existence, a shift that is to be identified not merely in terms of what it says but in what it actually practices. In this context, that the Indian state governs for the good of society and not for itself is identified as one of the major changes in its rationale.
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Book
01 Jan 2006

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , a Marxian theory of need is introduced, which makes possible the subjectification (not just subjection) of world of the third to hegemonic operations, all in the name of the development of third world.
Abstract: Marx shows two limit points to capitalism: one, exploitation as the limit of equality, liberty, and fraternity and original accumulation as the limit of the purportedly virtuous cycle of capitalism. He has also gestured towards another limit point of capitalism arising from its systemic method of optimizing resources for profit—destabilizing nature and creating a condition for planetary-crisis. We add a fourth here: needs or more specifically for this book: social needs. That in turn brings about a transformation in Marxian theory. We extend the class-focused decentred and disaggregated economic cartography developed in Chapter 2 to not just class, but also need-related processes. Consequently, processes of class-need in their overdetermination and struggle become the terrain for developing a Marxian theory of need, which in turn makes possible the process of subjectification (not just subjection) of world of the third to hegemonic operations. This is achieved by introducing what we define as hegemonic needs, all in the name of the development of third world. In contrast, radical need constitutes the counter-hegemonic engagement that, in conjunction with non-exploitation, opens an alternative ethico-political standpoint from a Marxian perspective.
References
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Book
01 Jan 1976

9,739 citations

Book
17 Apr 2008
TL;DR: Ewald and Fontana as discussed by the authors proposed a Content Index of Notions Index of Names (CIINN) index of names for the content index of the Course Content Index (CICN).
Abstract: Foreword: Francois Ewald and Alessandro Fontana Introduction: Arnold I. Davidson 10 January 1979 17 January 1979 24 January 1979 31 January 1979 7 February 1979 14 February 1979 21 February 1979 7 March 1979 14 March 1979 21 March 1979 28 March 1979 4 April 1979 Course Summary Course Content Index of Notions Index of Names

4,329 citations

Book
30 Mar 1991
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the psychology of war and the production of the self in the workplace. But their focus is on the subject of work and not on the individual.
Abstract: Preface. Introduction. PART ONE: PEOPLE AT WAR. 1. The Psychology of War. 2. The Government of Morale 3. The Sykewarriors 4. Groups at War. PART TWO: THE PRODUCTIVE SUBJECT 1. The Subject of Work 2. The Contented Worker 3. The Worker at War 4. Democracy at Work 5.The Expertise of Management 6. The Production of the Self. PART THREE: THE CHILD, THE FAMILY AND THE OUTSIDE WORLD 1. Governing Childhood 2. Normalising Chilren 3. Adjusting the Bonds of Love 4. Maximising the Mind 5. The Responsible Autonomous Family PART FOUR: MANAGING OURSELVES 1. The Therapeutic Imperative 2. Reshaping our Behaviour 3. Obliged to be Free 4. The Psychotherapy of Freedom.

3,939 citations

Book
01 Jan 1976
TL;DR: Becker applied economic analysis to various aspects of human activity, including social interactions; crime and punishment; marriage, fertility, and the family; and "irrational" behavior as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Since his pioneering Since his pioneering application of economic analysis to racial discrimination, Gary S. Becker has shown that an economic approach can provide a unified framework for understanding all human behavior. In a highly readable selection of essays Becker applies this approach to various aspects of human activity, including social interactions; crime and punishment; marriage, fertility, and the family; and "irrational" behavior.

3,238 citations

Book ChapterDOI
20 Jun 2005
TL;DR: Agamben's "Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, State of Exception" is the first book to theorize the state of exception in historical and philosophical context as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Two months after the attacks of 9/11, the Bush administration, in the midst of what it perceived to be a state of emergency, authorized the indefinite detention of noncitizens suspected of terrorist activities and their subsequent trials by a military commission. Here, distinguished Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben uses such circumstances to argue that this unusual extension of power, or "state of exception," has historically been an underexamined and powerful strategy that has the potential to transform democracies into totalitarian states. The sequel to Agamben's "Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, State of Exception" is the first book to theorize the state of exception in historical and philosophical context. In Agamben's view, the majority of legal scholars and policymakers in Europe as well as the United States have wrongly rejected the necessity of such a theory, claiming instead that the state of exception is a pragmatic question. Agamben argues here that the state of exception, which was meant to be a provisional measure, became in the course of the twentieth century a normal paradigm of government. Writing nothing less than the history of the state of exception in its various national contexts throughout Western Europe and the United States, Agamben uses the work of Carl Schmitt as a foil for his reflections as well as that of Derrida, Benjamin, and Arendt. In this highly topical book, Agamben ultimately arrives at original ideas about the future of democracy and casts a new light on the hidden relationship that ties law to violence.

2,918 citations