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Journal ArticleDOI

Assessing Sino-Indian Economic Relations in an Interdependence Framework: 1992-2008

01 Jan 2015-Vol. 3, Iss: 1, pp 129-159

Abstract: This study situates Sino-Indian economic interaction under the interdependence framework. By mapping conflict behavior in this dyad against the trends in the economic interdependence, we find a discernible shift away from escalation (high-level conflict) towards bargaining (diplomatic contestation). This paper argues that interdependence has only recently emerged in the India-China dyad and that lingering strategic distrust, national security consideration, and protectionist tendency have prevented the deepening of economic interdependence. The findings challenge the direction of interdependence in this dyad normally gleaned from nominal trade data. This paper also highlights key issue-areas that inhibit strategic coupling in the bilateral economic interaction.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Virginia Haufler1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Economic Interdependence and International Conflict: New Perspectives on an Enduring Debate. Edited by Edward D. Mansfield and Brian M. Pollins. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003. 286p. 28.00 paper.International trade is often wrapped up in a package with many good things—wealth, development, democracy, and peace. The proposition that increased trade is related to pacific international relations is one of the most well-known tenets of liberal theory. Despite its long history in political thought, the relationship between trade and peace has not been subject to extensive and systematic analysis until recently. In this edited volume, Edward D. Mansfield and Brian M. Pollins collect some of the most current thinking addressing the theoretical and methodological issues that arise in the quest to conceptualize and test the relationship between economic interdependence and international conflict. Understanding this relationship is important both theoretically and for policy reasons: Many policymakers today assume that increased trade will create a more peaceful world.

72 citations


Posted Content
01 Jan 2015
Abstract: Recent literature attributes the relative scarcity of open international markets to the prisoner's dilemma structure of state preferences with respect to trade. We argue that the prisoner's dilemma representation does not reflect the most critical aspect of free trade agreements in an anarchic international system, namely, their security externalities. We consider these external effects explicitly. Doing so leads us to two conclusions: (1) free trade is more likely within, rather than across, political-military alliances; and (2) alliances are more likely to evolve into free-trade coalitions if they are embedded in bipolar systems than in multipolar systems. Using data drawn from an SO-year period beginning in 1905, we test these hypotheses. The results of the analysis make it clear that alliances do have a direct, statistically significant, and large impact on bilateral trade flows and that this relationship is stronger in bipolar, rather than in multipolar, systems…

25 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Matteo Legrenzi1, Fred H. Lawson2Institutions (2)
Abstract: In the past half-decade, the role of the Gulf in the international political economy has changed dramatically. The region’s position as a supplier of world hydrocarbons has slipped, even as local consumption of oil and gas continues to expand. Gulf investments have shifted from the industrialized countries to the Middle East and North Africa. Saudi Arabia no longer exercises disproportionate influence in the Group of 20. Finally, relations with the People’s Republic of China and India have become truly interdependent, which gives the Gulf the capacity to exercise leverage over these two rising powers, despite its diminished position in global affairs.

5 citations


References
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Book
30 Sep 1997
Abstract: Security Analysis: Conceptual Apparatus The Military Sector The Environmental Sector The Economic Sector The Societal Sector The Political Sector How Sectors are Synthesized by Actors.

3,798 citations


Book
Robert O. Keohane1, Joseph S. Nye1Institutions (1)
01 Jan 1977
Abstract: I. UNDERSTANDING INTERDEPENDENCE. Interdependence in World Politics. Realism and Complex Interdependence. Explaining International Regime Change. II. REGIME CHANGE IN OCEANS AND MONEY. The Politics of Oceans and Money: Historical Overview. Complex Interdependence in Oceans and Money. The Politics Of Rule-Making in Oceans and Money. III. REGIMES AND TWO BILATERAL RELATIONSHIPS. United States Relations With Canada And Australia. IV. THE UNITED STATES AND COMPLEX INTERDEPENDENCE. Coping With Interdependence. V. SECOND THOUGHTS ON THEORY AND POLICY. Afterword. "Two Cheers for Multilateralism."

2,212 citations


"Assessing Sino-Indian Economic Rela..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Among the neo-realists, Keohane and Nye have argued that while economic relations have a bearing on political relations, the existence of “asymmetry” in economic interdependence can be a source of economic power for the less dependent state (Keohane and Nye, 1977, 10-27; 1989, 8-15)....

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Journal ArticleDOI

2,036 citations


"Assessing Sino-Indian Economic Rela..." refers background in this paper

  • ...Among the neo-realists, Keohane and Nye have argued that while economic relations have a bearing on political relations, the existence of “asymmetry” in economic interdependence can be a source of economic power for the less dependent state (Keohane and Nye, 1977, 10-27; 1989, 8-15)....

    [...]


Book
01 Jan 1977
Abstract: In this chapter, Keohene & Nye begin by applying the economic process model of regime change to oceans (the international regime of the sea) and money (international economic relations). This model predicts that “regimes will be established by technological and economic change, and that regimes will be established or reestablished to ensure the welfare benefits of interdependence” (131). While such a model does not provide a “sufficient explanation of any change” and may both over and under predict change, it must at the very least be considered.

1,887 citations


Book
18 Dec 2000
Abstract: Triangulating Peace tackles today's most provocative hypothesis in the field of international relations: the democratic peace proposition. Drawing on ideas originally put forth by Immanuel Kant, the authors argue that democracy, economic interdependence, and international mediation can successfully cooperate to significantly reduce the chances of war.

1,448 citations