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J.H. Veerkamp

Bio: J.H. Veerkamp is an academic researcher from Radboud University Nijmegen. The author has contributed to research in topics: Glomerular basement membrane & Heparan sulfate. The author has an hindex of 42, co-authored 128 publications receiving 6578 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that the use of ethanol during EDC crosslinking, offers an elegant means for the preparation of defined porous collagenous matrices containing bioavailable, covalently attached CS.

434 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Article de synthese sur les donnees recentes de caracteristiques structurales et physicochimiques de divers types of proteines de liaison aux acides gras, avec la signification physiologique de ces diversites.

366 citations

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TL;DR: It is concluded that EDC/NHS is generally applicable for attachment of GAGs to collagen and modulation of crosslinking conditions provides matrices with well-defined GAG contents, and biodegradabilities.

342 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that phage display technology presents a powerful technique to generate antibodies specific for HS epitopes, and for the first time this technique has been successfully applied to obtain directly antibodies to (poly)saccharides.

263 citations

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TL;DR: After immunization of mice with partially-purified heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) isolated from rat glomeruli, a monoclonal antibody (mAb JM-403) was obtained, which was directed against heparin sulfate (HS), the glycosaminoglycan side chain of HSPG.

235 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A modified form of the dim methylmethylene blue assay is described that has improved specificity for sulphated glycosaminoglycans, and it is shown that in conjunction with specific polysaccharidases, the dimethylmethyleneblue assay can be used to quantitate individual sulphated sugarcans.

3,345 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: A diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes) or chemical-induced diabetes (such as in the treatment of HIV/AIDS or after organ transplantation)
Abstract: 1. Type 1 diabetes (due to b-cell destruction, usually leading to absolute insulin deficiency) 2. Type 2 diabetes (due to a progressive insulin secretory defect on the background of insulin resistance) 3. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (diabetes diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that is not clearly overt diabetes) 4. Specific types of diabetes due to other causes, e.g., monogenic diabetes syndromes (such as neonatal diabetes and maturity-onset diabetes of the young [MODY]), diseases of the exocrine pancreas (such as cystic fibrosis), and drugor chemical-induced diabetes (such as in the treatment of HIV/AIDS or after organ transplantation)

2,339 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Contractile myocytes provide a test of the hypothesis that cells sense their mechanical as well as molecular microenvironment, altering expression, organization, and/or morphology accordingly, and have major implications for in vivo introduction of stem cells into diseased or damaged striated muscle of altered mechanical composition.
Abstract: Contractile myocytes provide a test of the hypothesis that cells sense their mechanical as well as molecular microenvironment, altering expression, organization, and/or morphology accordingly. Here, myoblasts were cultured on collagen strips attached to glass or polymer gels of varied elasticity. Subsequent fusion into myotubes occurs independent of substrate flexibility. However, myosin/actin striations emerge later only on gels with stiffness typical of normal muscle (passive Young's modulus, E approximately 12 kPa). On glass and much softer or stiffer gels, including gels emulating stiff dystrophic muscle, cells do not striate. In addition, myotubes grown on top of a compliant bottom layer of glass-attached myotubes (but not softer fibroblasts) will striate, whereas the bottom cells will only assemble stress fibers and vinculin-rich adhesions. Unlike sarcomere formation, adhesion strength increases monotonically versus substrate stiffness with strongest adhesion on glass. These findings have major implications for in vivo introduction of stem cells into diseased or damaged striated muscle of altered mechanical composition.

1,676 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The proteoglycan superfamily now contains more than 30 full-time molecules that fulfill a variety of biological functions and additional roles, derived from studies of mutant animals, indicate that certain proteoglycans are essential to life whereas others might be redundant.
Abstract: The proteoglycan superfamily now contains more than 30 full-time molecules that fulfill a variety of biological functions. Proteoglycans act as tissue organizers, influence cell growth and the maturation of specialized tissues, play a role as biological filters and modulate growth-factor activities, regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and skin tensile strength, affect tumor cell growth and invasion, and influence corneal transparency and neurite outgrowth. Additional roles, derived from studies of mutant animals, indicate that certain proteoglycans are essential to life whereas others might be redundant. The review focuses on the most recent genetic and molecular biological studies of the matrix proteoglycans, broadly defined as proteoglycans secreted into the pericellular matrix. Special emphasis is placed on the molecular organization of the protein core, the utilization of protein modules, the gene structure and transcriptional control, and the functional roles of the various proteoglycans. When possible, proteoglycans have been grouped into distinct gene families and subfamilies offering a simplified nomenclature based on their protein core design. The structure-function relationship of some paradigmatic proteoglycans is discussed in depth and novel aspects of their biology are examined.

1,650 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Consideration of experiments on the intracellular compartmentation of nucleotides shows support for this process between the cytoplasm and mitochondria, but not between the cytoskeleton and the nucleus.
Abstract: The concentrations of bases, nucleosides, and nucleosides mono-, di- and tri-phosphate are compared for about 600 published values. The data are predominantly from mammalian cells and fluids. For the most important ribonucleotides average concentrations ±SD (μM) are: ATP, 3,152±1,698; GTP, 468±224; UTP, 567±460 and CTP, 278±242. For deoxynucleosidestriphosphate (dNTP), the concentrations in dividing cells are: dATP, 24±22; dGTP, 5.2±4.5; dCTP, 29±19 and dTTP 37±30. By comparison, dUTP is usually about 0.2 μM. For, the 4 dNTPs, tumor cells have concentrations of 6–11 fold over normal cells, and for the 4 NTPs, tumor cells also have concentrations 1.2–5 fold over the normal cells. By comparison, the concentrations of NTPs are significantly lower in various types of blood cells. The average concentration of bases and nucleosides in plasma and other extracellular fluids is generally in the range of 0.4–6 μM; these values are usually lower than corresponding intracellular concentrations. For phosphate compounds, average cellular concentrations are: Pi, 4400; ribose-1-P, 55; ribose-5-P, 70 and P-ribose-PP, 9.0. The metal ion magnesium, important for coordinating phosphates in nucleotides, has values (mM) of: free Mg2+, 1.1; complexed-Mg, 8.0. Consideration of experiments on the intracellular compartmentation of nucleotides shows support for this process between the cytoplasm and mitochondria, but not between the cytoplasm and the nucleus.

1,571 citations