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Peter Cawley

Bio: Peter Cawley is an academic researcher from Imperial College London. The author has contributed to research in topics: Guided wave testing & Lamb waves. The author has an hindex of 68, co-authored 432 publications receiving 20564 citations. Previous affiliations of Peter Cawley include University of Sheffield & University of Bristol.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a method of non-destructively assessing the integrity of structures using measurements of the structural natural frequencies is described, where measurements made at a single point in the structure can be used to detect, locate and quantify damage.
Abstract: A method of non-destructively assessing the integrity of structures using measurements of the structural natural frequencies is described. It is shown how measurements made at a single point in the structure can be used to detect, locate and quantify damage. The scheme presented uses finite-element analysis, since this method may be used on any structure. The principle may, however, be used in conjunction with other mathematical techniques. Only one full analysis is required for each type of structure.Results are presented from tests on an aluminium plate and a cross-ply carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate. Excellent agreement is shown between the predicted and actual damage sites and a useful indication of the magnitude of the defect is obtained.

1,379 citations

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TL;DR: The results indicate that Lamb waves may be used to find notches when the wavelength to notch depth ratio is on the order of 40, and the 2-D Fourier transform method is used to quantify Lamb wave interactions with defects.
Abstract: The interaction of individual Lamb waves with a variety of defects simulated by notches is investigated using finite-element analysis, and the results are checked experimentally. Excellent agreement is obtained. It is shown that a 2-D Fourier transform method may be used to quantify Lamb wave interactions with defects. The sensitivity of individual Lamb waves to particular notches is dependent on the frequency-thickness product, the mode type and order, and the geometry of the notch. The sensitivity of the Lamb modes a/sub 1/, alpha /sub 0/, and s/sub 0/ to simulated defects in different frequency-thickness regions is predicted as a function of the defect depth to plate thickness ratio and the results indicate that Lamb waves may be used to find notches when the wavelength to notch depth ratio is on the order of 40. Transmission ratios of Lamb waves across defects are highly frequency dependent. >

912 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FFT) was used to measure the amplitudes and velocities of the Lamb waves propagating in a plate, the output of the transform being presented using an isometric projection which gives a three-dimensional view of the wave-number dispersion curves.
Abstract: A technique for the analysis of propagating multimode signals is presented. The method involves a two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the time history of the waves received at a series of equally spaced positions along the propagation path. The technique has been used to measure the amplitudes and velocities of the Lamb waves propagating in a plate, the output of the transform being presented using an isometric projection which gives a three-dimensional view of the wave-number dispersion curves. The results of numerical and experimental studies to measure the dispersion curves of Lamb waves propagating in 0.5-, 2.0-, and 3.0-mm-thick steel plates are presented. The results are in good agreement with analytical predictions and show the effectiveness of using the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) method to identify and measure the amplitudes of individual Lamb modes.

889 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This investigation was designed to study the application of a non-invasive test method using resonance frequency analysis to make quantitative measurements of the stability of the implant tissue interface in- vitro and in-vivo.
Abstract: Bone anchored implants are now being used in dentistry for supporting intraoral and craniofacial prostheses. Although high success rates have been reported, a small number of implants may fail during the early healing phase or lateral in function. Currently available clinical methods to determine implant stability and osseointegration are relatively crude and may entail percussing a fixture with a blunt instrument. Radiographs are of value, but a standardised technique is necessary to ensure repeatability. This investigation was designed to study the application of a non-invasive test method using resonance frequency analysis to make quantitative measurements of the stability of the implant tissue interface in-vitro and in-vivo. The resonance frequency of a small transducer was measured when attached to implants embedded at different heights in an aluminum block. A strong correlation (r = 0.94, p < 0.01) was observed between the observed frequency and the height of implantation fixture exposed. The change in stiffness observed in the bone surrounding an implant during healing was modelled by embedding implants in self-curing polymethylmethacrylate and measuring the resonance frequency at periods during polymerisation. A significant increase in resonance frequency was observed related to the increase in stiffness. Resonance frequency measurements were also made on implants in-vivo and the results correlated well with the in-vitro findings.

801 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a method of non-destructively evaluating the integrity of structures is described and applied to structures for which a one dimensional analysis is satisfactory, and it is shown how vibration measureme...
Abstract: A method of non-destructively evaluating the integrity of structures is described and applied to structures for which a one dimensional analysis is satisfactory. It is shown how vibration measureme...

665 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide an overview of methods to detect, locate, and characterize damage in structural and mechanical systems by examining changes in measured vibration response, including frequency, mode shape, and modal damping.
Abstract: This paper provides an overview of methods to detect, locate, and characterize damage in structural and mechanical systems by examining changes in measured vibration response. Research in vibration-based damage identification has been rapidly expanding over the last few years. The basic idea behind this technology is that modal parameters (notably frequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping) are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, damping, and stiffness). Therefore, changes in the physical properties will cause detectable changes in the modal properties. The motivation for the development of this technology is presented. The methods are categorized according to various criteria such as the level of damage detection provided, model-based versus non-model-based methods, and linear versus nonlinear methods. The methods are also described in general terms including difficulties associated with their implementation and their fidelity. Past, current, and future-planned applications of this technology to actual engineering systems are summarized. The paper concludes with a discussion of critical issues for future research in the area of vibration-based damage identification.

2,715 citations

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TL;DR: In this article, a new parameter called curvature mode shape is investigated as a possible candidate for identifying and locating damage in a structure, and it is shown that the absolute changes in the curvature shape are localized in the region of damage and hence can be used to detect damage.

1,924 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of natural frequency as a diagnostic parameter in structural assessment procedures using vibration monitoring is discussed in this paper, based on the fact that natural frequencies are sensitive indicators of structural integrity.

1,885 citations

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors provide a concise point of departure for researchers and practitioners alike wishing to assess the current state of the art in the control and monitoring of civil engineering structures, and provide a link between structural control and other fields of control theory.
Abstract: This tutorial/survey paper: (1) provides a concise point of departure for researchers and practitioners alike wishing to assess the current state of the art in the control and monitoring of civil engineering structures; and (2) provides a link between structural control and other fields of control theory, pointing out both differences and similarities, and points out where future research and application efforts are likely to prove fruitful. The paper consists of the following sections: section 1 is an introduction; section 2 deals with passive energy dissipation; section 3 deals with active control; section 4 deals with hybrid and semiactive control systems; section 5 discusses sensors for structural control; section 6 deals with smart material systems; section 7 deals with health monitoring and damage detection; and section 8 deals with research needs. An extensive list of references is provided in the references section.

1,883 citations