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Victor Arrizón

Bio: Victor Arrizón is an academic researcher from National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics. The author has contributed to research in topics: Phase (waves) & Holography. The author has an hindex of 24, co-authored 120 publications receiving 2104 citations. Previous affiliations of Victor Arrizón include Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla & Rolf C. Hagen Group.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown analytically and experimentally that such a vortex can be approximately generated in the Fourier transforming optical system with a computer-controlled liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.
Abstract: We introduce the concept of the perfect optical vortex whose dark hollow radius does not depend on the topological charge. It is shown analytically and experimentally that such a vortex can be approximately generated in the Fourier transforming optical system with a computer-controlled liquid-crystal spatial light modulator.

426 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Two holograms of this class of phase computer-generated holograms for the encoding of arbitrary scalar complex fields are described that allow high quality reconstruction of the encoded field even if they are implemented with a low-resolution pixelated phase modulator.
Abstract: We discuss a class of phase computer-generated holograms for the encoding of arbitrary scalar complex fields. We describe two holograms of this class that allow high quality reconstruction of the encoded field, even if they are implemented with a low-resolution pixelated phase modulator. In addition, we show that one of these holograms can be appropriately implemented with a phase modulator limited by a reduced phase depth.

416 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An improved technique for generating the perfect optical vortex is proposed and is notable for the simplicity of its practical realization and high quality of the results.
Abstract: We propose an improved technique for generating the perfect optical vortex. This technique is notable for the simplicity of its practical realization and high quality of the results. The efficiency of the proposed technique is illustrated with the results of physical experiments and an example of its application in optical trapping of small particles.

126 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that computer generated holograms, implemented with amplitude-only liquid crystal spatial light modulators, allow the synthesis of fully complex fields with high accuracy and are appropriate for modulators whose amplitude transmittance is coupled with a linear phase modulation.
Abstract: We show that computer generated holograms, implemented with amplitude-only liquid crystal spatial light modulators, allow the synthesis of fully complex fields with high accuracy. Our main discussion considers modified amplitude holograms whose transmittance is obtained by adding an appropriate bias function to the real cosine computer hologram of the encoded signal. We first propose a bias function, given by a soft envelope of the signal modulus, which is appropriate for perfect amplitude modulators. We also consider a second bias term, given by a constant function, which results appropriate for modulators whose amplitude transmittance is coupled with a linear phase modulation. The influence of the finite pixel size of the spatial light modulator is compensated by digital pre-filtering of the encoded complex signal. The performance of the discussed amplitude CGHs is illustrated by means of numerical simulations and the experimental synthesis of high order Bessel beams.

102 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A variety of multilevel phase structures that can be used to generate Lohmann's array illuminators are described and several experimental verifications of the synthesis of these structures by using simple binary curves in a conventional optical processor are reported.
Abstract: We describe a variety of multilevel phase structures that can be used to generate Lohmann's array illuminators. We report several experimental verifications of the synthesis of such multilevel phase structures by using simple binary curves in a conventional optical processor.

92 citations


Cited by
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Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, a fast Fourier transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed to discriminate between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour generation techniques.
Abstract: A fast-Fourier-transform method of topography and interferometry is proposed. By computer processing of a noncontour type of fringe pattern, automatic discrimination is achieved between elevation and depression of the object or wave-front form, which has not been possible by the fringe-contour-generation techniques. The method has advantages over moire topography and conventional fringe-contour interferometry in both accuracy and sensitivity. Unlike fringe-scanning techniques, the method is easy to apply because it uses no moving components.

3,742 citations

01 May 1996
TL;DR: In this article, the authors report the creation of thermal, Fock, coherent, and squeezed states of motion of a harmonically bound {sup 9}Be{sup +} ion.
Abstract: We report the creation of thermal, Fock, coherent, and squeezed states of motion of a harmonically bound {sup 9}Be{sup +} ion. The last three states are coherently prepared from an ion which has been initially laser cooled to the zero point of motion. The ion is trapped in the regime where the coupling between its motional and internal states, due to applied (classical) radiation, can be described by a Jaynes-Cummings-type interaction. With this coupling, the evolution of the internal atomic state provides a signature of the number state distribution of the motion. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

702 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 Sep 2008-Analyst
TL;DR: An intuitive description of the complex physics of plasmons and near-field interactions is provided and how these effects will result in new classes of experimental procedures, novel probes, bioassays and devices are suggested.
Abstract: Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used in biological research. Until recently, essentially all fluorescence experiments were performed using optical energy which has radiated to the far-field. By far-field we mean at least several wavelengths from the fluorophore, but propagating far-field radiation is usually detected at larger macroscopic distances from the sample. In recent years there has been a growing interest in the interactions of fluorophores with metallic surfaces or particles. Near-field interactions are those occurring within a wavelength distance of an excited fluorophore. The spectral properties of fluorophores can be dramatically altered by near-field interactions with the electron clouds present in metals. These interactions modify the emission in ways not seen in classical fluorescence experiments. In this review we provide an intuitive description of the complex physics of plasmons and near-field interactions. Additionally, we summarize the recent work on metal-fluorophore interactions and suggest how these effects will result in new classes of experimental procedures, novel probes, bioassays and devices.

541 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is outlined how virtually all the previous ISO-standard beam diagnostic techniques may be readily replaced with all-digital equivalents, thus paving the way for unravelling of light in real time.
Abstract: Modal decomposition of light has been known for a long time, applied mostly to pattern recognition. With the commercialization of liquid-crystal devices, digital holography as an enabling tool has become accessible to all, and with it all-digital tools for the decomposition of light have finally come of age. We review recent advances in unravelling the properties of light, from the modal structure of laser beams to decoding the information stored in orbital angular momentum (OAM)-carrying fields. We show application of these tools to fiber lasers, solid-state lasers, and structured light created in the laboratory by holographic laser beam shaping. We show by experimental implementation how digital holograms may be used to infer the intensity, phase, wavefront, Poynting vector, polarization, and OAM density of some unknown optical field. In particular, we outline how virtually all the previous ISO-standard beam diagnostic techniques may be readily replaced with all-digital equivalents, thus paving the way for unravelling of light in real time. Such tools are highly relevant to the in situ analysis of laser systems, to mode division multiplexing as an emerging tool in optical communication, and for quantum information processing with entangled photons.

503 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Mirhosseini et al. demonstrate a scheme that is able to separate photons with different orbital angular angular momentum with 92% efficiency, which has the potential to increase data rates and enhance security in quantum optical communications.
Abstract: The orbital angular momentum of photons has the potential to dramatically increase data rates and enhance security in quantum optical communications. Here, Mirhosseini et al. demonstrate a scheme that is able to separate photons with different orbital angular momentum with 92% efficiency.

441 citations