Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format
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Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format
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Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format Example of Sexually Transmitted Infections format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 13684973 e-ISSN: 14723263
recommended Recommended

Sexually Transmitted Infections — Template for authors

Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Dermatology #9 of 117 -
Infectious Diseases #52 of 288 down down by 6 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 428 Published Papers | 2748 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 18/07/2020
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Top papers
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

3.396

1% from 2018

Impact factor for Sexually Transmitted Infections from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.396
2018 3.365
2017 3.346
2016 3.212
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 1% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

6.4

5% from 2019

CiteRatio for Sexually Transmitted Infections from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 6.4
2019 6.1
2018 5.5
2017 6.0
2016 6.4
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 5% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.893

12% from 2019

SJR for Sexually Transmitted Infections from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.893
2019 1.684
2018 1.672
2017 1.626
2016 1.725
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 12% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.379

0% from 2019

SNIP for Sexually Transmitted Infections from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.379
2019 1.385
2018 1.186
2017 1.202
2016 1.257
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 0% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Sexually Transmitted Infections

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BMJ Publishing Group

Sexually Transmitted Infections

Sexually Transmitted Infections is the world's longest running international journal on sexual health. It aims to keep practitioners, trainees and researchers up to date in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of all STIs and HIV. The journal publishes original research, de...... Read More

Dermatology

Infectious Diseases

Medicine

i
Last updated on
18 Jul 2020
i
ISSN
1368-4973
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.429
i
Acceptance Rate
26%
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
unsrt
i
Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
C. W. J. Beenakker. Specular andreev reflection in graphene. Phys. Rev. Lett., 97(6):067007, 2006.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/STI.75.1.3
From epidemiological synergy to public health policy and practice: the contribution of other sexually transmitted diseases to sexual transmission of HIV infection.
Douglas Fleming1, Judith N. Wasserheit1

Abstract:

Objectives: To review the scientific data on the role of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in sexual transmission of HIV infection and discuss the implications of these findings for HIV and STD prevention policy and practice Methods: Articles were selected from a review of Medline, accessed with the OVID search engine The ... Objectives: To review the scientific data on the role of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in sexual transmission of HIV infection and discuss the implications of these findings for HIV and STD prevention policy and practice Methods: Articles were selected from a review of Medline, accessed with the OVID search engine The search covered articles from January 1987 to September 1998 and yielded 2101 arti- cles Methods used to uncover articles which might have been missed included searching for related articles by author, and combing literature reviews In addition, all abstracts under the cat- egory "sexually transmitted diseases" from the XI and XII International Conferences on AIDS (Vancouver 1996 and Geneva 1998) and other relevant scientific meetings were reviewed Efforts were made to locate journal articles which resulted from the research reported in the identified abstracts All original journal articles and abstracts which met one of the following criteria were included: (1) studies of the biological plausibility or mechanism of facilitation of HIV infectious- ness or susceptibility by STDs, (2) prospective cohort studies (longitudinal or nested case-control) which estimate the risk of HIV infection associated with specific STDs or STD syndromes, or (3) intervention studies which quantitate the eVect which STD treatment can have on HIV incidence Results: Strong evidence indicates that both ulcerative and non-ulcerative STDs promote HIV transmission by augmenting HIV infectiousness and HIV susceptibility via a variety of biological mechanisms These eVects are reflected in the risk estimates found in numerous prospective studies from four continents which range from 20 to 235, with most clustering between 2 and 5 The relative importance of ulcerative and non-ulcerative STDs appears to be complex Owing to the greater frequency of non-ulcerative STDs in many populations, these infections may be responsible for more HIV transmission than genital ulcers However, the limited reciprocal impact of HIV infection on non-ulcerative STDs and the evidence that non-ulcerative STDs may increase risk primarily for the receptive partner (rather than bidirectionally) may modulate the impact of these diseases The results of two community level randomised, controlled intervention trials conducted in Africa suggest that timely provision of STD services can substantially reduce HIV incidence, but raise additional questions about the optimal way to target and implement these services to achieve the greatest eVect on HIV transmission Conclusions: Available data leave little doubt that other STDs facilitate HIV transmission through direct, biological mechanisms and that early STD treatment should be part of a high quality, comprehensive HIV prevention strategy Policy makers, HIV prevention programme managers, and providers should focus initial implementation eVorts on three key areas: (i) improving access to and quality of STD clinical services; (ii) promoting early and eVective STD related healthcare behaviours; and (iii) establishing surveillance systems to monitor STD and HIV trends and their interrelations (Sex Transm Inf 1999;75:3-17) read more read less

Topics:

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (59%)59% related to the paper, Sexually transmitted disease (56%)56% related to the paper, Sexual transmission (55%)55% related to the paper
View PDF
2,227 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/STI.79.6.442
HIV testing attitudes AIDS stigma and voluntary HIV counselling and testing in a black township in Cape Town South Africa.
Seth C. Kalichman1, Leickness C. Simbayi

Abstract:

Objectives: A cornerstone of HIV prevention in South Africa is voluntary HIV antibody counselling and testing (VCT), but only one in five South Africans aware of VCT have been tested. This study examined the relation between HIV testing history, attitudes towards testing, and AIDS stigmas. Methods: Men (n = 224) and women (n ... Objectives: A cornerstone of HIV prevention in South Africa is voluntary HIV antibody counselling and testing (VCT), but only one in five South Africans aware of VCT have been tested. This study examined the relation between HIV testing history, attitudes towards testing, and AIDS stigmas. Methods: Men (n = 224) and women (n = 276) living in a black township in Cape Town completed venue intercept surveys; 98% were black, 74% age 35 or younger. Results: 47% of participants had been tested for HIV. Risks for exposure to HIV were high and comparable among people tested and not tested. Comparisons on attitudes toward VCT, controlling for demographics and survey venue, showed that individuals who had not been tested for HIV and those tested but who did not know their results held significantly more negative testing attitudes than individuals who were tested, particularly people who knew their test results. Compared to people who had been tested, individuals who were not tested for HIV demonstrated significantly greater AIDS related stigmas; ascribing greater shame, guilt, and social disapproval to people living with HIV. Knowing test results among those tested was not related to stigmatising beliefs. Conclusions: Efforts to promote VCT in South Africa require education about the benefits of testing and, perhaps more important, reductions in stigmatising attitudes towards people living with AIDS. Structural and social marketing interventions that aim to reduce AIDS stigmas will probably decrease resistance to seeking VCT. read more read less

Topics:

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (59%)59% related to the paper, Population (50%)50% related to the paper
View PDF
767 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/STI.70.5.364
Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles View PDF
610 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/STI.47.1.1
Natural history of genital warts.

Abstract:

Genital warts were known to the ancients, and many Greek and Roman writers referred to them. The early history of the disease has recently been reviewed by Bafverstedt (1967), who pointed out that some of the early synonyms for the lesions, particularly the words 'fig' and 'condyloma', have survived into modern times. In the ... Genital warts were known to the ancients, and many Greek and Roman writers referred to them. The early history of the disease has recently been reviewed by Bafverstedt (1967), who pointed out that some of the early synonyms for the lesions, particularly the words 'fig' and 'condyloma', have survived into modern times. In the Middle Ages, descriptions of diseases were less precise than in the ancient world, but some of the genital lesions described (Lanfranc, 1306) may have been warts. The outbreak of syphilis in Europe at the end of the 15th century led to renewed interest in genital diseases, but at this time most genital lesions were attributed to the 'venereal poison', and no causal distinction was made between the diseases now known as gonorrhoea, syphilis, and genital warts. Even Hunter (1786), who gave a clear description of genital warts, regarded them as a manifestation of syphilis, and did not differentiate them from condylomata lata. The important recognition that genital warts comprised a disease entity unrelated to syphilis was first made by Bell (1793), and his work was later confirmed by Jourdan (1826) and Ricord (1838). But, as the belief that genital warts were due to syphilis was gradually abandoned, the erroneous view developed that they were connected with gonorrhoea (Pirrie, 1852); indeed, in the 19th century, they were sometimes referred to as 'gonorrhoeal warts'. But Aime Martin (1872) pointed out that many patients with genital warts gave no history of gonorrhoea, and after the isolation of the gonococcus in 1879 it was realised that over half of the patients with genital warts showed no sign of it (Jadassohn, 1905). Many 19th century writers thought that genital warts were caused by irritation of the epidermis by various agents such as dirt, decomposed smegma, and genital discharges (Astley Cooper, 1835; Bumstead, 1864). This 'non-specific irritant' theory was widely accepted for many years; Cronquist (1912) strongly supported it, and it was reaffirmed well into the 20th century (Kaplan, 1942). read more read less

Topics:

Genital warts (70%)70% related to the paper, Natural history (50%)50% related to the paper
View PDF
507 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1136/STI.77.2.84
Measuring sexual behaviour: methodological challenges in survey research
Kevin A. Fenton1, Anne M Johnson, Sally McManus, Bob Erens

Abstract:

Series editors J M Stephenson, A Babiker The study of sexual behaviour lies at the heart of understanding the transmission dynamics of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Academic investigation into sexual behaviour dates back to the 18th century and, over time, has employed a variety of approaches including the medical ... Series editors J M Stephenson, A Babiker The study of sexual behaviour lies at the heart of understanding the transmission dynamics of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Academic investigation into sexual behaviour dates back to the 18th century and, over time, has employed a variety of approaches including the medical and psychiatric investigation of sexual disorders, anthropological investigations, and survey research based largely on volunteer samples. More recent studies, driven largely by the public health response to HIV/AIDS, have focused on large scale probability sample survey research.1–5 Key areas of inquiry have shifted towards describing population patterns of risk behaviours for STI/HIV transmission, understanding how epidemics of STIs are generated, and informing disease control strategies. Sexual behaviour is a largely private activity, subject to varying degrees of social, cultural, religious, moral and legal norms and constraints. A key challenge for all sex survey research is to generate unbiased and precise measures of individual and population behaviour patterns. Methods are needed to minimise measurement error which may be introduced by participation bias, recall and comprehension problems, and respondents' willingness to report sensitive and sometimes socially censured attitudes or behaviours.6, 7 This paper briefly considers the role of different types of study in understanding STI epidemiology. It then focuses on potential sources of measurement error in survey research and strategies for assessing and limiting them.Sex Transm Inf 2001;77:84–92 The type of study chosen will depend on the purpose of the investigation. However, studies generally fall into four main groups: general population surveys, studies on population subgroups, partner and network studies, ethnographic and qualitative studies. ### GENERAL POPULATION PROBABILITY SAMPLE SURVEYS Cross sectional population surveys aim to describe the overall distribution of behaviours in populations. By using probability sampling techniques and maximising response rates, large scale behavioural surveys can provide robust estimates of the prevalence … read more read less

Topics:

Population (58%)58% related to the paper, Participation bias (55%)55% related to the paper
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493 Citations
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Sexually Transmitted Infections format uses unsrt citation style.

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Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Sexually Transmitted Infections guidelines and autoformat it.

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Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Sexually Transmitted Infections citation style.

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A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Sexually Transmitted Infections's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

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To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
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  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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SciSpace would allow download of your references in Sexually Transmitted Infections Endnote style, according to bmj-publishing-group guidelines.

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