Example of Biological Conservation format
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Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format
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Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format Example of Biological Conservation format
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Biological Conservation — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics #28 of 647 up up by 8 ranks
Nature and Landscape Conservation #9 of 177 down down by 4 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 1480 Published Papers | 13128 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 14/06/2020
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Related Journals

open access Open Access

Cambridge University Press

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 4.2
SJR: 0.785
SNIP: 1.061
open access Open Access

Springer

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 3.7
SJR: 1.001
SNIP: 1.212
open access Open Access

Wiley

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 5.5
SJR: 0.912
SNIP: 1.624
open access Open Access

Wiley

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 4.9
SJR: 1.214
SNIP: 1.356

Journal Performance & Insights

CiteRatio

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

8.9

17% from 2019

CiteRatio for Biological Conservation from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 8.9
2019 7.6
2018 8.1
2017 7.8
2016 7.4
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

2.227

4% from 2019

SJR for Biological Conservation from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.227
2019 2.149
2018 2.242
2017 2.397
2016 2.451
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

2.125

10% from 2019

SNIP for Biological Conservation from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 2.125
2019 1.924
2018 1.9
2017 1.859
2016 1.707
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 17% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 10% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.
Biological Conservation

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Elsevier

Biological Conservation

Biological Conservation publishes articles spanning a diverse range of fields that contribute to the biological, sociological, and economic dimensions of conservation and natural resource management. Biological Conservation has as its primary aim the publication of high-qualit...... Read More

Nature and Landscape Conservation

Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Environmental Science

i
Last updated on
14 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0006-3207
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Impact Factor
High - 1.934
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Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
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Bibliography Example
Blonder, G.E., Tinkham, M., Klapwijk, T.M., 1982. Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B 25, 4515–4532.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0006-3207(92)91201-3
Conservation evaluation and phylogenetic diversity
Daniel P. Faith1
01 Jan 1992 - Biological Conservation

Abstract:

Protecting biological diversity with limited resources may require placing conservation priorities on different taxa. A system of priorities that reflects the value of taxonomic diversity can be achieved by setting priorities such that the subset of taxa that is protected has maximum underlying feature diversity. Such feature... Protecting biological diversity with limited resources may require placing conservation priorities on different taxa. A system of priorities that reflects the value of taxonomic diversity can be achieved by setting priorities such that the subset of taxa that is protected has maximum underlying feature diversity. Such feature diversity of taxon subsets is difficult to estimate directly, but can be predicted by the cladistic/phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. In this study, a simple measure of phylogenetic diversity is defined based on cladistic information. The measure of phylogenetic diversity, PD, is contrasted with a measure of taxic diversity recently developed by Vane-Wright et al. (Biol. Conserv., 55, 1991). In re-examining reserve-selection scenarios based on a phylogeny of bumble bees (Apidae), PD produces quite different priorities for species conservation, relative to taxic diversity. The potential application of PD at levels below that of the species is then illustrated using a mtDNA phylogeny for populations of crested newts Triturus cristatus. Calculation of PD for different population subsets shows that protection of populations at either of two extremes of the geographic range of the group can significantly increase the phylogenetic diversity that is protected. read more read less

Topics:

Gamma diversity (67%)67% related to the paper, Alpha diversity (64%)64% related to the paper, Phylogenetic diversity (63%)63% related to the paper, Phylogenetic tree (53%)53% related to the paper, Taxon (52%)52% related to the paper
3,366 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.BIOCON.2008.07.014
Stakeholder participation for environmental management: A literature review
Mark Reed1
01 Oct 2008 - Biological Conservation

Abstract:

The complex and dynamic nature of environmental problems requires flexible and transparent decision-making that embraces a diversity of knowledges and values. For this reason, stakeholder participation in environmental decision-making has been increasingly sought and embedded into national and international policy. Although m... The complex and dynamic nature of environmental problems requires flexible and transparent decision-making that embraces a diversity of knowledges and values. For this reason, stakeholder participation in environmental decision-making has been increasingly sought and embedded into national and international policy. Although many benefits have been claimed for participation, disillusionment has grown amongst practitioners and stakeholders who have felt let down when these claims are not realised. This review first traces the development of participatory approaches in different disciplinary and geographical contexts, and reviews typologies that can be used to categorise and select participatory methods. It then reviews evidence for normative and pragmatic benefits of participation, and evaluates limitations and drawbacks. Although few of the claims that are made have been tested, there is evidence that stakeholder participation can enhance the quality of environmental decisions by considering more comprehensive information inputs. However, the quality of decisions made through stakeholder participation is strongly dependant on the nature of the process leading to them. Eight features of best practice participation are then identified from a Grounded Theory Analysis of the literature. These features emphasise the need to replace a ‘‘tool-kit’’ approach, which emphasises selecting the relevant tools for the job, with an approach that emphasises participation as a process. It is argued that stakeholder participation needs to be underpinned by a philosophy that emphasises empowerment, equity, trust and learning. Where relevant, participation should be considered as early as possible and throughout the process, representing relevant stakeholders systematically. The process needs to have clear objectives from the outset, and should not overlook the need for highly skilled facilitation. Local and scientific knowledges can be integrated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of complex and dynamic socio-ecological systems and processes. Such knowledge can also be used to evaluate the appropriateness of potential technical and local solutions to environmental problems. Finally, it is argued that to overcome many of its limitations, stakeholder participation must be institutionalised, creating organisational cultures that can facilitate processes where goals are negotiated and outcomes are necessarily uncertain. In this light, participatory processes may seem very risky, but there is growing evidence that if well designed, these perceived risks may be well worth taking. The review concludes by identifying future research needs. read more read less

Topics:

Stakeholder analysis (65%)65% related to the paper, Public participation (63%)63% related to the paper, Stakeholder (58%)58% related to the paper, Participatory modeling (57%)57% related to the paper, Grounded theory (52%)52% related to the paper
3,052 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.BIOCON.2009.02.021
The Brazilian Atlantic Forest:: how much is left and how is the remaining forest distributed? Implications for conservation
01 Jun 2009 - Biological Conservation

Abstract:

The neotropical Atlantic Forest supports one of the highest degrees of species richness and rates of endemism on the planet, but has also undergone a huge forest loss. However, there exists no broad-scale information about the spatial distribution of its remnants that could guide conservation actions, especially when systemat... The neotropical Atlantic Forest supports one of the highest degrees of species richness and rates of endemism on the planet, but has also undergone a huge forest loss. However, there exists no broad-scale information about the spatial distribution of its remnants that could guide conservation actions, especially when systematic biodiversity data are not available. In this context, our objectives were to quantify how much of the forest still remains, and analyze its spatial distribution. We considered the entire Brazilian Atlantic Forest, and eight sub-regions, defined according to species distribution. The results revealed a serious situation: more than 80% of the fragments are <50 ha, almost half the remaining forest is <100 m from its edges, the average distance between fragments is large (1440 m), and nature reserves protect only 9% of the remaining forest and 1% of the original forest. On the other hand, our estimates of existing Atlantic Forest cover were higher than previous ones (7–8%), ranging from 11.4% to 16%. The differences among estimates are mainly related to our inclusion of intermediate secondary forests and small fragments (<100 ha), which correspond to approximately 32–40% of what remains. We suggest some guidelines for conservation: (i) large mature forest fragments should be a conservation priority; (ii) smaller fragments can be managed in order to maintain functionally linked mosaics; (iii) the matrix surrounding fragments should be managed so as to minimize edge effects and improve connectivity; and (iv) restoration actions should be taken, particularly in certain key areas. The clear differences in the amount remaining and its spatial distribution within each sub-region must be considered when planning for biodiversity conservation. read more read less

Topics:

Biodiversity (50%)50% related to the paper
View PDF
2,827 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.BIOCON.2005.09.005
Urbanization as a major cause of biotic homogenization
Michael L. McKinney1
01 Jan 2006 - Biological Conservation

Abstract:

When measured by extent and intensity, urbanization is one of the most homogenizing of all major human activities. Cities homogenize the physical environment because they are built to meet the relatively narrow needs of just one species, our own. Also, cities are maintained for centuries in a disequilibrium state from the loc... When measured by extent and intensity, urbanization is one of the most homogenizing of all major human activities. Cities homogenize the physical environment because they are built to meet the relatively narrow needs of just one species, our own. Also, cities are maintained for centuries in a disequilibrium state from the local natural environment by the importation of vast resources of energy and materials. Consequently, as cities expand across the planet, biological homogenization increases because the same “urban-adaptable” species become increasingly widespread and locally abundant in cities across the planet. As urbanization often produces a local gradient of disturbance, one can also observe a gradient of homogenization. Synanthropic species adapted to intensely modified built habitats at the urban core are “global homogenizers”, found in cities worldwide. However, many suburban and urban fringe habitats are occupied by native species that become regionally widespread. These suburban adapters typically consist of early successional plants and “edge” animal species such as mesopredator mammals, and ground-foraging, omnivorous and frugivorous birds that can utilize gardens, forest fragments and many other habitats available in the suburbs. A basic conservation challenge is that urban biota is often quite diverse and very abundant. The intentional and unintentional importation of species adapted to urban habitats, combined with many food resources imported for human use, often produces local species diversity and abundance that is often equal to or greater than the surrounding landscape. With the important exception of low-income areas, urban human populations often inhabit richly cultivated suburban habitats with a relatively high local floral and faunal diversity and/or abundance without awareness of the global impoverishment caused by urbanization. Equally challenging is that, because so many urban species are immigrants adapting to city habitats, urbanites of all income levels become increasingly disconnected from local indigenous species and their natural ecosystems. Urban conservation should therefore focus on promoting preservation and restoration of local indigenous species. read more read less

Topics:

Urban ecology (58%)58% related to the paper, Urbanization (56%)56% related to the paper, Species diversity (55%)55% related to the paper, Introduced species (53%)53% related to the paper, Habitat (50%)50% related to the paper
2,439 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article
The future of biodiversity
01 Jan 1996 - Biological Conservation

Abstract:

Recent extinction rates are 100 to 1000 times their pre-human levels in well-known, but taxonomically diverse groups from widely different environments. If all species currently deemed "threatened" become extinct in the next century, then future extinction rates will be 10 times recent rates. Some threatened species will surv... Recent extinction rates are 100 to 1000 times their pre-human levels in well-known, but taxonomically diverse groups from widely different environments. If all species currently deemed "threatened" become extinct in the next century, then future extinction rates will be 10 times recent rates. Some threatened species will survive the century, but many species not now threatened will succumb. Regions rich in species found only within them (endemics) dominate the global patterns of extinction. Although new technology provides details of habitat losses, estimates of future extinctions are hampered by our limited knowledge of which areas are rich in endemics. read more read less

Topics:

Extinction (63%)63% related to the paper, Biodiversity (63%)63% related to the paper, Threatened species (62%)62% related to the paper, Measurement of biodiversity (53%)53% related to the paper, Aquatic biodiversity research (53%)53% related to the paper
1,917 Citations
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Biological Conservation format uses elsarticle-num citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Biological Conservation in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Biological Conservation guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Biological Conservation guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Biological Conservation guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Biological Conservation?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Biological Conservation citation style.

4. Can I use the Biological Conservation templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Biological Conservation.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Biological Conservation that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Biological Conservation that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Biological Conservation?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Biological Conservation.

7. Where can I find the template for the Biological Conservation?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Biological Conservation's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Biological Conservation's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Biological Conservation an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Biological Conservation is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Biological Conservation?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Biological Conservation?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Biological Conservation?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Biological Conservation, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Biological Conservation's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Biological Conservation?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Biological Conservation. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Biological Conservation?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Biological Conservation are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Biological Conservation?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Biological Conservation's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Biological Conservation in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Biological Conservation Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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