scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Author

Gwanggil Jeon

Bio: Gwanggil Jeon is an academic researcher from Incheon National University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Computer science & Deinterlacing. The author has an hindex of 30, co-authored 511 publications receiving 4071 citations. Previous affiliations of Gwanggil Jeon include Hanyang University & Xidian University.


Papers
More filters
Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Mar 2019
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as mentioned in this paper proposed an image super-resolution feedback network (SRFBN) to refine low-level representations with high-level information, which uses hidden states in a recurrent neural network (RNN) with constraints to achieve such feedback manner.
Abstract: Recent advances in image super-resolution (SR) explored the power of deep learning to achieve a better reconstruction performance. However, the feedback mechanism, which commonly exists in human visual system, has not been fully exploited in existing deep learning based image SR methods. In this paper, we propose an image super-resolution feedback network (SRFBN) to refine low-level representations with high-level information. Specifically, we use hidden states in a recurrent neural network (RNN) with constraints to achieve such feedback manner. A feedback block is designed to handle the feedback connections and to generate powerful high-level representations. The proposed SRFBN comes with a strong early reconstruction ability and can create the final high-resolution image step by step. In addition, we introduce a curriculum learning strategy to make the network well suitable for more complicated tasks, where the low-resolution images are corrupted by multiple types of degradation. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed SRFBN in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods. Code is avaliable at https://github.com/Paper99/SRFBN_CVPR19.

418 citations

Posted Content
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as discussed by the authors proposed an image super-resolution feedback network (SRFBN) to refine low-level representations with high-level information, which uses hidden states in an RNN with constraints to achieve such feedback manner.
Abstract: Recent advances in image super-resolution (SR) explored the power of deep learning to achieve a better reconstruction performance. However, the feedback mechanism, which commonly exists in human visual system, has not been fully exploited in existing deep learning based image SR methods. In this paper, we propose an image super-resolution feedback network (SRFBN) to refine low-level representations with high-level information. Specifically, we use hidden states in an RNN with constraints to achieve such feedback manner. A feedback block is designed to handle the feedback connections and to generate powerful high-level representations. The proposed SRFBN comes with a strong early reconstruction ability and can create the final high-resolution image step by step. In addition, we introduce a curriculum learning strategy to make the network well suitable for more complicated tasks, where the low-resolution images are corrupted by multiple types of degradation. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed SRFBN in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods. Code is avaliable at this https URL.

386 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings indicate that the developed framework successfully distinguishes individuals who walk too near and breaches/violates social distances; also, the transfer learning approach boosts the overall efficiency of the model.

182 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The comparative study shows that deep learning techniques can be built by introducing a number of methods in combination with supervised and unsupervised training techniques, and indicates that high involvement of humans to design sophisticated and optimized algorithms based on machine and deeplearning techniques is high.

157 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A luma-chroma demultiplexing algorithm is presented in detail, using a least-squares design methodology for the required bandpass filters, and it was found to provide excellent performance and the best quality-speed tradeoff among the methods studied.
Abstract: This paper addresses the problem of interpolating missing color components at the output of a Bayer color filter array (CFA), a process known as demosaicking. A luma-chroma demultiplexing algorithm is presented in detail, using a least-squares design methodology for the required bandpass filters. A systematic study of objective demosaicking performance and system complexity is carried out, and several system configurations are recommended. The method is compared with other benchmark algorithms in terms of CPSNR and S-CIELAB ΔE* objective quality measures and demosaicking speed. It was found to provide excellent performance and the best quality-speed tradeoff among the methods studied.

109 citations


Cited by
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI

[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Machine learning addresses many of the same research questions as the fields of statistics, data mining, and psychology, but with differences of emphasis.
Abstract: Machine Learning is the study of methods for programming computers to learn. Computers are applied to a wide range of tasks, and for most of these it is relatively easy for programmers to design and implement the necessary software. However, there are many tasks for which this is difficult or impossible. These can be divided into four general categories. First, there are problems for which there exist no human experts. For example, in modern automated manufacturing facilities, there is a need to predict machine failures before they occur by analyzing sensor readings. Because the machines are new, there are no human experts who can be interviewed by a programmer to provide the knowledge necessary to build a computer system. A machine learning system can study recorded data and subsequent machine failures and learn prediction rules. Second, there are problems where human experts exist, but where they are unable to explain their expertise. This is the case in many perceptual tasks, such as speech recognition, hand-writing recognition, and natural language understanding. Virtually all humans exhibit expert-level abilities on these tasks, but none of them can describe the detailed steps that they follow as they perform them. Fortunately, humans can provide machines with examples of the inputs and correct outputs for these tasks, so machine learning algorithms can learn to map the inputs to the outputs. Third, there are problems where phenomena are changing rapidly. In finance, for example, people would like to predict the future behavior of the stock market, of consumer purchases, or of exchange rates. These behaviors change frequently, so that even if a programmer could construct a good predictive computer program, it would need to be rewritten frequently. A learning program can relieve the programmer of this burden by constantly modifying and tuning a set of learned prediction rules. Fourth, there are applications that need to be customized for each computer user separately. Consider, for example, a program to filter unwanted electronic mail messages. Different users will need different filters. It is unreasonable to expect each user to program his or her own rules, and it is infeasible to provide every user with a software engineer to keep the rules up-to-date. A machine learning system can learn which mail messages the user rejects and maintain the filtering rules automatically. Machine learning addresses many of the same research questions as the fields of statistics, data mining, and psychology, but with differences of emphasis. Statistics focuses on understanding the phenomena that have generated the data, often with the goal of testing different hypotheses about those phenomena. Data mining seeks to find patterns in the data that are understandable by people. Psychological studies of human learning aspire to understand the mechanisms underlying the various learning behaviors exhibited by people (concept learning, skill acquisition, strategy change, etc.).

13,246 citations

Christopher M. Bishop1
01 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Probability distributions of linear models for regression and classification are given in this article, along with a discussion of combining models and combining models in the context of machine learning and classification.
Abstract: Probability Distributions.- Linear Models for Regression.- Linear Models for Classification.- Neural Networks.- Kernel Methods.- Sparse Kernel Machines.- Graphical Models.- Mixture Models and EM.- Approximate Inference.- Sampling Methods.- Continuous Latent Variables.- Sequential Data.- Combining Models.

10,141 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
22 Jan 2006
TL;DR: Some of the major results in random graphs and some of the more challenging open problems are reviewed, including those related to the WWW.
Abstract: We will review some of the major results in random graphs and some of the more challenging open problems. We will cover algorithmic and structural questions. We will touch on newer models, including those related to the WWW.

7,116 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper is aimed to demonstrate a close-up view about Big Data, including Big Data applications, Big Data opportunities and challenges, as well as the state-of-the-art techniques and technologies currently adopt to deal with the Big Data problems.

2,516 citations