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Hrudayanath Thatoi

Bio: Hrudayanath Thatoi is an academic researcher from North Orissa University. The author has contributed to research in topics: Chromate conversion coating & Hexavalent chromium. The author has an hindex of 32, co-authored 136 publications receiving 3806 citations. Previous affiliations of Hrudayanath Thatoi include Biju Patnaik University of Technology & Department of Biotechnology.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The chemical/biological remediation processes for Cr(VI) and their efficiency have been summarised in some detail and the interaction of chromium with various microbial/bacterial strains isolated and their reduction capacity towards Cr( VI) are also discussed.

841 citations

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TL;DR: The present review discusses on the types of chromate reductases found in different bacteria, their mode of action and potential applications in bioremediation of hexavalent chromium both under free and immobilize conditions.

363 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A Cr(VI) removal mechanism considering both the surface immobilization and intracellular accumulation of Cr(III) along with the formation of coagulated cell precipitate by living B. amyloliquefaciens was suggested.

181 citations

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TL;DR: The present paper makes an attempt to review the microbial diversity in mangrove ecosystems and explore their potential applications in various fields such as agriculture, pharmaceutical, industrial, environmental and medical sciences.
Abstract: Mangrove forests occurring at the interface of terrestrial and marine ecosystems represent a rich biological diversity of plants, animals and microorganisms. Microbes, being an important component of the mangrove environment, not only play a very critical role in creating and maintaining this biosphere but also serve as a source of biotechnologically valuable and important products. By participating in various steps of decomposition and mineralization of leaf litter, microbes make an essential contribution to the productivity of the mangrove ecosystem. They able to recycle nutrients, produce and consume gases that affect global climate, destroy pollutants, treat anthropogenic wastes and can also be used for biological control of plant and animal pests. Microorganisms from mangrove environments are a major source of antimicrobial agents and also produce a wide range of important medicinal compounds, including enzymes, antitumor agents, insecticides, vitamins, immunosuppressants, and immune modulators. However, the phylogenetic and functional description of microbial diversity in mangrove ecosystems has not been addressed to the same extent as for other environments. Even though the mangrove ecosystem is very rich in microbial diversity, less than 5% of species have been described; in many cases neither their ecological role nor their application potential is known. Recently developed technologies in molecular biology and genetics offer great promise to explore the potential of microbial diversity. Hence, the present paper makes an attempt to review the microbial diversity in mangrove ecosystems and explore their potential applications in various fields such as agriculture, pharmaceutical, industrial, environmental and medical sciences.

179 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Biotechnological potentials of phosphate solubilizing microorganisms from mangrove environment which is a unique saline costal ecosystem of tropical and subtropical regions of the world are reported.
Abstract: Phosphorus (P) is one of the major essential macronutrients for biological growth and development of plants. Phosphorous in soil is mainly found as mineral phosphorous or organic phosphorous which is however insoluble and unavailable to the plants. Microorganisms, both bacteria and fungi play a central role in the natural phosphorus cycle and convert insoluble forms of phosphorus to an accessible form which is an important trait for the growth and survival of plants. Among the phosphate solubilizing microbes, strains from the bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Rhizobium and fungi such as Pencillium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Helminthosparium, Alternaria, etc. are the most powerful phosphate solubilizers. Phosphorous solubilization by microorganisms is a complex phenomenon, which depends on many factors such as nutritional, physiological and growth condition of the culture. The principal mechanism for mineral phosphate solubilization is the production of organic acids where the enzyme phosphatases play a major role in the mineralization of organic phosphorous in soil. In recent years several phosphatases encoding genes have been cloned and characterized and a few genes involved in mineral phosphate solubilization have been isolated. Therefore, genetic manipulation for improvement of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria to improve plant growth may include cloning genes involved in both mineral and organic phosphate solubilization, followed by their expression in selected rhizobacterial strains is an interesting approach. Besides phosphate solubilizing activity of microorganisms, the present paper also reports biotechnological potentials of phosphate solubilizing microorganisms from mangrove environment which is a unique saline costal ecosystem of tropical and subtropical regions of the world.

167 citations