Example of Experimental Brain Research format
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Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format
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Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format Example of Experimental Brain Research format
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open access Open Access

Experimental Brain Research — Template for authors

Publisher: Springer
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Neuroscience (all) #68 of 110 down down by 11 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Medium
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 1117 Published Papers | 3865 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 11/06/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

1.591

15% from 2018

Impact factor for Experimental Brain Research from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 1.591
2018 1.878
2017 1.806
2016 1.917
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

3.5

3% from 2019

CiteRatio for Experimental Brain Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.5
2019 3.4
2018 3.2
2017 3.7
2016 3.9
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 15% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 3% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.782

1% from 2019

SJR for Experimental Brain Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.782
2019 0.773
2018 0.899
2017 0.913
2016 0.99
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

0.925

6% from 2019

SNIP for Experimental Brain Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.925
2019 0.869
2018 0.889
2017 0.829
2016 0.825
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 1% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 6% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Experimental Brain Research

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Springer

Experimental Brain Research

Experimental Brain Research accepts original contributions on many aspects of experimental research of the central and peripheral nervous system in the fields of molecular, physiology, behaviour, neurochemistry, developmental, cellular and molecular neurobiology, and experimen...... Read More

Neuroscience

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Last updated on
11 Jun 2020
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ISSN
0014-4819
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Impact Factor
High - 1.065
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Open Access
No
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
SPBASIC
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al, 1982)
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Bibliography Example
Blonder GE, Tinkham M, Klapwijk TM (1982) Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys Rev B 25(7):4515_x0015_ 4532, URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00230027
Understanding motor events-a neurophysiological study
G. di Pellegrino1, Luciano Fadiga1, Leonardo Fogassi1, Vittorio Gallese1, Giacomo Rizzolatti1

Abstract:

Neurons of the rostral part of inferior premotor cortex of the monkey discharge during goal-directed hand movements such as grasping, holding, and tearing. We report here that many of these neurons become active also when the monkey observes specific, meaningful hand movements performed by the experimenters. The effective exp... Neurons of the rostral part of inferior premotor cortex of the monkey discharge during goal-directed hand movements such as grasping, holding, and tearing. We report here that many of these neurons become active also when the monkey observes specific, meaningful hand movements performed by the experimenters. The effective experimenters' movements include among others placing or retrieving a piece of food from a table, grasping food from another experimenter's hand, and manipulating objects. There is always a clear link between the effective observed movement and that executed by the monkey and, often, only movements of the experimenter identical to those controlled by a given neuron are able to activate it. These findings indicate that premotor neurons can retrieve movements not only on the basis of stimulus characteristics, as previously described, but also on the basis of the meaning of the observed actions. read more read less

Topics:

Premotor cortex (55%)55% related to the paper, Mirror neuron (55%)55% related to the paper, Body movement (53%)53% related to the paper, Mu wave (51%)51% related to the paper
2,852 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00236911
Spatial control of arm movements
Pietro Morasso1

Abstract:

Human subjects were instructed to point one hand to different visual targets which were randomly sequenced, using a paradigm which allowed two degrees of freedom (shoulder, elbow). The time course of the hand trajectory and the joint angular curves were observed. The latter exhibited patterns which change markedly for differe... Human subjects were instructed to point one hand to different visual targets which were randomly sequenced, using a paradigm which allowed two degrees of freedom (shoulder, elbow). The time course of the hand trajectory and the joint angular curves were observed. The latter exhibited patterns which change markedly for different movements, whereas the former preserve similar characteristics (in particular, a single peaked tangential velocity curve). The hypothesis is then formulated that the central command for these movements is formulated in terms of trajectories of the hand in space. read more read less
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1,575 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00237997
Roles of glabrous skin receptors and sensorimotor memory in automatic control of precision grip when lifting rougher or more slippery objects
Roland S. Johansson1, G. Westling1

Abstract:

To be successful, precision manipulation of small objects requires a refined coordination of forces excerted on the object by the tips of the fingers and thumb. The present paper deals quantitatively with the regulation of the coordination between the grip force and the vertical lifting force, denoted as the load force, while... To be successful, precision manipulation of small objects requires a refined coordination of forces excerted on the object by the tips of the fingers and thumb. The present paper deals quantitatively with the regulation of the coordination between the grip force and the vertical lifting force, denoted as the load force, while small objects were lifted, positioned in space and replaced by human subjects using the pinch grip. It was shown that the grip force changed in parallel with the load force generated by the subject to overcome various forces counteracting the intended manipulation. The balance between the two forces was adapted to the friction between the skin and the object providing a relatively small safety margin to prevent slips, i.e. the more slippery the object the higher the grip force at any given load force. Experiments with local anaesthesia indicated that this adaptation was dependent on cutaneous afferent input. Afferent information related to the frictional condition could influence the force coordination already about 0.1 s after the object was initially gripped, i.e. approximately at the time the grip and load forces began to increase in parallel. Further, “secondary”, adjustments of the force balance could occur later in response to small short-lasting slips, revealed as vibrations in the object. The new force balance following slips was maintained, indicating that the relationship between the two forces was set on the basis of a memory trace. Its updating was most likely accounted for by tactile afferent information entering intermittently at inappropriate force coordination, e.g. as during slips. The latencies between the onset of such slips and the appearance of the adjustments (0.06–0.08 s) clearly indicated that the underlying neural mechanisms operated highly automatically. read more read less
1,499 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00248742
Functional organization of inferior area 6 in the macaque monkey. II. Area F5 and the control of distal movements.

Abstract:

The functional properties of neurons located in the rostral part of inferior area 6 were studied in awake, partially restrained macaque monkeys. The most interesting property of these neurons was that their firing correlated with specific goal-related motor acts rather than with single movements made by the animal. Using the ... The functional properties of neurons located in the rostral part of inferior area 6 were studied in awake, partially restrained macaque monkeys. The most interesting property of these neurons was that their firing correlated with specific goal-related motor acts rather than with single movements made by the animal. Using the motor acts as the classification criterion we subdivided the neurons into six classes, four related to distal motor acts and two related to proximal motor acts. The distal classes are: "Grasping-with-the-hand-and-the-mouth neurons", "Grasping-with-the-hand neurons", "Holding neurons" and "Tearing neurons". The proximal classes are: "Reaching neurons" and "Bringing-to-the-mouth-or-to-the-body neurons". The vast majority of the cells belonged to the distal classes. A particularly interesting aspect of distal class neurons was that the discharge of many of them depended on the way in which the hand was shaped during the motor act. Three main groups of neurons were distinguished: "Precision grip neurons", "Finger prehension neurons", "Whole hand prehension neurons". Almost the totality of neurons fired during motor acts performed with either hand. About 50% of the recorded neurons responded to somatosensory stimuli and about 20% to visual stimuli. Visual neurons were more difficult to trigger than the corresponding neurons located in the caudal part of inferior area 6 (area F4). They required motivationally meaningful stimuli and for some of them the size of the stimulus was also critical. In the case of distal neurons there was a relationship between the type of prehension coded by the cells and the size of the stimulus effective in triggering the neurons. It is proposed that the different classes of neurons form a vocabulary of motor acts and that this vocabulary can be assessed by somatosensory and visual stimuli. read more read less

Topics:

Mu wave (51%)51% related to the paper, Somatosensory system (50%)50% related to the paper
1,454 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00239352
Visual Neurones Responsive to Faces in the Monkey Temporal Cortex
David I. Perrett1, Edmund T. Rolls1, W. Caan1

Abstract:

Of 497 single neurones recorded in the cortex in the fundus of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) of three alert rhesus monkeys, a population of at least 48 cells which were selectively responsive to faces had the following response properties: (1) The cells' responses to faces (real or projected, human or rhesus monkey) were... Of 497 single neurones recorded in the cortex in the fundus of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) of three alert rhesus monkeys, a population of at least 48 cells which were selectively responsive to faces had the following response properties: (1) The cells' responses to faces (real or projected, human or rhesus monkey) were two to ten times as large as those to gratings, simple geometrical stimuli or complex 3-D objects. (2) Neuronal responses to faces were excitatory, sustained and were time-locked to the stimulus presentation with a latency of between 80 and 160 ms. (3) The cells were unresponsive to auditory or tactile stimuli and to the sight of arousing or aversive stimuli. (4) The magnitude of the responses of 28 cells tested was relatively constant despite transformations, such as rotation, so that the face was inverted or horizontal, and alterations of colour, size or distance. (5) Rotation to profile substantially reduced the responses of 21 cells (31 tested). (6) Masking out or presenting parts of the face (i.e. eyes, mouth or hair) in isolation revealed that different cells responded to different features or subsets of features. (7) For several cells, responses to the normal organisation of cut-out or line-drawn facial features were significantly larger than to jumbled controls. These findings indicate that explanations in terms of arousal, emotional or motor reactions, simple visual feature sensitivity or receptive fields are insufficient to account for the selective responses to faces and face features observed in this population of STS neurones. It appears that these neurones are part of a system specialised to code for faces or features present in faces, and it is suggested that damage to this system is related to prosopagnosia, or difficulty in face recognition, in man and to the tameness and social disturbances which follow temporal lobe damage and are part of the Kluver-Bucy syndrome in the monkey. read more read less

Topics:

Temporal cortex (56%)56% related to the paper, Receptive field (54%)54% related to the paper, Superior temporal sulcus (53%)53% related to the paper, Population (53%)53% related to the paper, Stimulus (physiology) (52%)52% related to the paper
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1,267 Citations
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Experimental Brain Research format uses SPBASIC citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Experimental Brain Research in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Experimental Brain Research guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Experimental Brain Research guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Experimental Brain Research guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Experimental Brain Research?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Experimental Brain Research citation style.

4. Can I use the Experimental Brain Research templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Experimental Brain Research.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Experimental Brain Research that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Experimental Brain Research that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Experimental Brain Research?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Experimental Brain Research.

7. Where can I find the template for the Experimental Brain Research?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Experimental Brain Research's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Experimental Brain Research's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Experimental Brain Research an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Experimental Brain Research is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Experimental Brain Research?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Experimental Brain Research?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Experimental Brain Research?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Experimental Brain Research, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Experimental Brain Research's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Experimental Brain Research?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Experimental Brain Research. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Experimental Brain Research?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Experimental Brain Research are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Experimental Brain Research?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Experimental Brain Research's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Experimental Brain Research in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Experimental Brain Research Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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