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JournalISSN: 0735-2166

Journal of Urban Affairs 

Taylor & Francis
About: Journal of Urban Affairs is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Metropolitan area & Politics. It has an ISSN identifier of 0735-2166. Over the lifetime, 2051 publications have been published receiving 40852 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a broad and occasionally polemical meditation on the nature and significance of creative cities in the context of the so-called new economy and trace out the connections of these phenomena to recent shifts in technologies, structures of production, labor markets, and the dynamics of locational agglomeration.
Abstract: This article represents a broad and occasionally polemical meditation on the nature and significance of creative cities. I seek to situate the concept of creative cities within the context of the so-called new economy and to trace out the connections of these phenomena to recent shifts in technologies, structures of production, labor markets, and the dynamics of locational agglomeration. I try to show, in particular, how the structures of the new economy unleash historically specific forms of economic and cultural innovation in modern cities. The argument is concerned passim with policy issues and, above all, with the general possibilities and limitations faced by policymakers in any attempt to build creative cities. The effects of globalization are discussed, with special reference to the prospective emergence of a worldwide network of creative cities bound together in relations of competition and cooperation. In the conclusion, I pinpoint some of the darker dimensions-both actual and potential-of creative cities.

944 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that the ability to craft arrangements through which resources can be mobilized, thus enabling a community to accomplish difficult and non-routine goals, is a creative exercise of political choice.
Abstract: Regime theory starts with the proposition that governing capacity is not easily captured through the electoral process. Governing capacity is created and maintained by bringing together coalition partners with appropriate resources, nongovernmental as well as governmental. If a governing coalition is to be viable, it must be able to mobilize resources commensurate with its main policy agenda. The author uses this reasoning as the foundation/or comparing regimes by the nature and difficulty of the government tasks they undertake and the level and kind of resources required for these tasks. Political leadership, he argues, is a creative exercise of political choice, involving the ability to craft arrangements through which resources can be mobilized, thus enabling a community to accomplish difficult and nonroutine goals.

914 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper made an attempt to sketch the variety of ethnic and social segregation within Europe, using a large number of sources and found that generally segregation levels in Europe are more moderate compared to what we can find in American cities, but these differences are not absolute.
Abstract: The measurement of segregation, the understanding of its drivers, and the effects of segregation are three interrelated issues that receive ample attention on both sides of the Atlantic. The comparative study of these subjects in Europe is not an easy task because the continent is highly fragmented and diversified. This regards the types of welfare state, but also the multitude of urban histories. Consequently, there is a lack of uniform information. Nevertheless, this paper makes an attempt to sketch the variety of ethnic and social segregation within Europe, using a large number of sources. It is shown that generally segregation levels in Europe are more moderate compared to what we can find in American cities, but these differences are not absolute. The paper also links the levels of segregation with a range of potential explanations and provides a window on European research focusing on effects of segregation.

562 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article examined the disproportionate siting and minority move-in hypotheses in Los Angeles County by reconciling tract geography and data over three decades with firm-level information on the initial siting dates for toxic storage and disposal facilities.
Abstract: Previous research suggests that minority residential areas have a disproportionate likelihood of hosting various environmental hazards. Some critics have responded that the contemporary correlation of race and hazards may reflect post-siting minority move-in, perhaps because of a risk effect on housing costs, rather than discrimination in siting. This article examines the disproportionate siting and minority move-in hypotheses in Los Angeles County by reconciling tract geography and data over three decades with firm-level information on the initial siting dates for toxic storage and disposal facilities. Using simple t-tests, logit analysis, and a novel simultaneous model, we find that disproportionate siting matters more than disproportionate minority move-in in the sample area. Racial transition is also an important predictor of siting, suggesting a role for multiracial organizing in resisting new facilities.

514 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the post-industrial city, citizens in the postindustrial city increasingly make quality of life demands, treating their own urban location as if tourists, emphasizing aesthetic concerns as discussed by the authors, and these practices impact considerations about the proper nature of amenities that postindustrial cities can sustain.
Abstract: Studies of the city traditionally posit a division between a city’s economy and its culture, with culture subordinate in explanatory power to work. However, post–industrial and globalizing trends are dramatically elevating the importance of culture. Cultural activities are increasingly crucial to urban economic vitality. Models to explain the growth of cities from the era of industrial manufacturing are outmoded. Citizens in the postindustrial city increasingly make quality of life demands, treating their own urban location as if tourists, emphasizing aesthetic concerns. These practices impact considerations about the proper nature of amenities that post–industrial cities can sustain.

489 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2023173
2022195
2021183
2020139
2019107
201887