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Marc V. Levine

Bio: Marc V. Levine is an academic researcher from University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. The author has contributed to research in topics: Language policy & Metropolitan area. The author has an hindex of 9, co-authored 32 publications receiving 553 citations.

Papers
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TL;DR: In the early 1970s, Baltimore has been heralded as a model of how declining, older U.S. cities can be revitalized as discussed by the authors, and economic development strategy has hinged on the creation of a "good...
Abstract: Since the early 1970s, Baltimore has been heralded as a model of how declining, older U.S. cities can be revitalized Baltimore’s economic development strategy has hinged on the creation of a “good ...

172 citations

Book
27 Jun 1990
TL;DR: A map of Montreal can be found in this paper, where the authors discuss the history of the Quiet Revolution and the Politicization of Language in Montreal and the role of Francophones in this process.
Abstract: A Note on Vocabulary Acknowledgments List of Abbreviations Note to the Paperback Edition Map of Montreal 1. Introduction 2. An English City: Montreal before the Quiet Revolution Urban Growth and Linguistic Diversity, 1760-1960 * Linguistic Geography and the Two Solitudes * Language Use and Language Choice through 1960 * Language and the Economy: Historical Patterns * The Politics of Language through 1960 * Language Policy before 1960 * Urban Governance and Linguistic Accommodation * The Winds of Change: Language and Politics in the 1950s 3. The Quiet Revolution and the Politicization of Language The Roots of the Quiet Revolution * Linguistic Tensions and the Quiet Revolution * Francophone Demands for a Government Language Policy, 1960-1966 * The Anglicization of Immigrants * The Political Ramifications of Immigrant Anglicization 4. Linguistic Crises and Policy Responses, 1967-1969 Policy Response I: Bill 85 * Conflicts Become Crises: Linguistic Battles of 1969 * Policy Response II: Bill 63 * Language and the Restructuring of School Governance * Conclusion 5. A Polarized City, 1970-1976 Montreal 1970: A City in Turmoil * The Federal Government and Montreal's Language Question * Holding Action, 1970-1973 * Bourassa Prepares to Act * Bill 22: A Policy Disaster * Conclusion 6. Bill 101 and the Politics of Language, 1977-1989 The PQ Enacts a Language Policy * Anglophones and Bill 101 * Conflicts and Compromises in Language Policy, 1979-1985 * Bourassa Reignites the Language Question, 1985-1989 * The Impact of Bill 101: Education * Conclusion 7. Public Policy, Language, and the Montreal Economy, 1960-1989 The Quebec State and Francophone Economic Development * State Corporations and Francophone Economic Development * The Linguistic Impact of Public Works * Closing the Linguistic Education Gap * Language Policy and Regulation of the Private Sector * Conclusion 8. The Francisation of the Montreal Economy The Language of the Workplace * The Control of Capital * The Socioeconomic Status of Francophones * The External Face of Business * Public Policy, Market Forces, and Economic Change * Conclusion 9. English and French in the New Montreal Linguistic Demography, 1971-1986 * The End of the Two Solitudes? * The New Ethnicity and Francophone Montreal * The New Francophone Class Structure * Whither the Language Question Notes Index

86 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Rise And Fall Of Milwaukee: 18181870 as mentioned in this paper The Rise and Fall of Industrial Milwaukee: 19301950 The Decline of Industrial Wisconsin: 19501990 An Analytic Summary of Milwaukee Three Comparative Histories
Abstract: Introduction * Building, Unbuilding, and Rebuilding American Cities * Themes and Perspectives on the American City The Rise And Fall Of Milwaukee * Pre-Industrial Milwaukee: 18181870 * Early Industrial Milwaukee: 18701900 * Mature Industrial Milwaukee: 19001930 * Reshaping Industrial Milwaukee: 19301950 * The Decline of Industrial Milwaukee: 19501990 * An Analytic Summary of Milwaukee Three Comparative Histories * Introduction * The Rise and Fall of Industrial Cleveland * The Rise of a Post-Industrial City: Austin, Texas * The Rebirth of MinneapolisSt * Paul: Creating a Post-Industrial City in the Midwest Conclusion * Building Cities in America

38 citations

01 Jan 1991

18 citations


Cited by
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TL;DR: In recent years, urban governance has become increasingly preoccupied with the exploration of new ways in which to foster and encourage local development and employment growth as mentioned in this paper, and urban entrepreneurship has become a hot topic.
Abstract: In recent years, urban governance has become increasingly preoccupied with the exploration of new ways in which to foster and encourage local development and employment growth. Such an entrepreneur...

4,183 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a critique of the recently popularized concepts of the "creative class" and 'creative cities' and argue that creativity strategies barely disrupt extant urban-policy orthodoxies, based on interlocal competition, place marketing, property-and market-led development, and normalized socio-spatial inequality.
Abstract: This article develops a critique of the recently popularized concepts of the ‘creative class’ and ‘creative cities’. The geographic reach and policy salience of these discourses is explained not in terms of their intrinsic merits, which can be challenged on a number of grounds, but as a function of the profoundly neoliberalized urban landscapes across which they have been traveling. For all their performative display of liberal cultural innovation, creativity strategies barely disrupt extant urban-policy orthodoxies, based on interlocal competition, place marketing, property- and market-led development, gentrification and normalized socio-spatial inequality. More than this, these increasingly prevalent strategies extend and recodify entrenched tendencies in neoliberal urban politics, seductively repackaging them in the soft-focus terms of cultural policy. This has the effect of elevating creativity to the status of a new urban imperative — defining new sites, validating new strategies, placing new subjects and establishing new stakes in the realm of competitive interurban relations. L’article presente une critique des concepts de ‘classe creative’ et ‘villes creatives’ publies recemment. La portee geographique et la pertinence politique de ces discours s’expliquent non par leurs merites intrinseques, ceux-ci pouvant etre remis en question a plus d’un titre, mais en tant que fonction des paysages urbains fortement neoliberaux qu’ils ont traverses. Quant a leur manifestation concrete de l’innovation culturelle liberale, les strategies de creativite derangent a peine les orthodoxies qui subsistent en politique urbaine, fondees sur une competition interlocale, un marketing de lieu, une expansion axee sur la propriete et le marche, un embourgeoisement et une inegalite socio-spatiale normalisee. Mais surtout, ces strategies toujours plus presentes prolongent et recodifient des tendances bien installees en politique urbaine neoliberale, les rhabillant de maniere attrayante dans un flou artistique terminologique de politique culturelle. Ainsi, la creativite est elevee au statut de nouvel imperatif urbain pour definir de nouveaux sites, valider de nouvelles strategies, positionner de nouveaux sujets et instaurer de nouveaux enjeux dans la concurrence interurbaine.

2,082 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sociological studies sensitive to the issue of place are rarely labeled thus, and at the same time there are far too many of them to fit in this review as discussed by the authors, and it may be a good thing that this research is seldom gathered up as a socology of place, for that could ghettoize the subject as something of interest only to geographers, architects, or environmental historians.
Abstract: Sociological studies sensitive to the issue of place are rarely labeled thus, and at the same time there are far too many of them to fit in this review. It may be a good thing that this research is seldom gathered up as a “sociology of place,” for that could ghettoize the subject as something of interest only to geographers, architects, or environmental historians. The point of this review is to indicate that sociologists have a stake in place no matter what they analyze, or how: The works cited below emplace inequality, difference, power, politics, interaction, community, social movements, deviance, crime, life course, science, identity, memory, history. After a prologue of definitions and methodological ruminations, I ask: How do places come to be the way they are, and how do places matter for social practices and historical change?

1,974 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A study of the historical geography of concepts of space and time suggests that the roots of the social construction of these concepts lie in the mode of production and its characteristic social relations as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Although concepts of space and time are socially constructed, they operate with the full force of objective fact and play a key role in processes of social reproduction. Conceptions of space and time are inevitably, therefore, contested as part and parcel of processes of social change, no matter whether that change is superimposed from without (as in imperialist domination) or generated from within (as in the conflict between environmentalist and economic standards of decision making). A study of the historical geography of concepts of space and time suggests that the roots of the social construction of these concepts lie in the mode of production and its characteristic social relations. In particular, the revolutionary qualities of a capitalistic mode of production, marked by strong currents of technological change and rapid economic growth and development, have been associated with powerful revolutions in the social conceptions of space and time. The implications of these revolutions, implying ...

863 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The photo-elicitation interview (PEI) as discussed by the authors is a qualitative interview methodology, and it has been used extensively in the field of photo-enhanced video analysis.
Abstract: This article discusses the photo-elicitation interview (PEI), a qualitative methodology, by addressing its fundamentals, providing examples of how to use it, and arguing its benefits and potential ...

786 citations