Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format
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Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format Example of Marine and Freshwater Research format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 13231650

Marine and Freshwater Research — Template for authors

Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Ecology #109 of 400 up up by 10 ranks
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics #178 of 647 up up by 40 ranks
Aquatic Science #70 of 224 up up by 13 ranks
Oceanography #42 of 128 up up by 2 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
Good
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 736 Published Papers | 2660 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 20/06/2020
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Top papers
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

1.488

20% from 2018

Impact factor for Marine and Freshwater Research from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 1.488
2018 1.859
2017 1.674
2016 1.757
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 20% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.6

CiteRatio for Marine and Freshwater Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 3.6
2019 3.6
2018 3.1
2017 2.8
2016 2.8
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.693

2% from 2019

SJR for Marine and Freshwater Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.693
2019 0.708
2018 0.828
2017 0.782
2016 0.715
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.832

4% from 2019

SNIP for Marine and Freshwater Research from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.832
2019 0.797
2018 0.731
2017 0.865
2016 0.743
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 4% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 1427873 e-ISSN: 14643774

Oxford University Press

CiteRatio: 3.9 | SJR: 0.87 | SNIP: 0.911
open access Open Access ISSN: 10151621 e-ISSN: 14209055

Springer

CiteRatio: 4.0 | SJR: 0.881 | SNIP: 0.986
open access Open Access ISSN: 15592723 e-ISSN: 15592731

Springer

CiteRatio: 4.6 | SJR: 0.944 | SNIP: 1.144
open access Open Access ISSN: 9247963 e-ISSN: 18791573

Elsevier

CiteRatio: 4.8 | SJR: 0.828 | SNIP: 1.089
Marine and Freshwater Research

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CSIRO Publishing

Marine and Freshwater Research

Marine and Freshwater Research is an international and interdisciplinary journal publishing contributions on all aquatic environments. The journals content addresses broad conceptual questions and investigations about the ecology and management of aquatic environments. Environ...... Read More

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Last updated on
20 Jun 2020
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ISSN
1323-1650
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Impact Factor
High - 1.757
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Acceptance Rate
Not provided
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Frequency
12 issues per year
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Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
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Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M. and Klapwijk, T. M. (1982). Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge im-balance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25(7), 4515–4532. URL: 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/MF99078
Climate change, coral bleaching and the future of the world's coral reefs

Abstract:

Sea temperatures in many tropical regions have increased by almost 1 degrees C over the past 100 years, and are currently increasing at similar to 1-2 degrees C per century. Coral bleaching occurs when the thermal tolerance of corals and their photosynthetic symbionts (zooxanthellae) is exceeded. Mass coral bleaching has occu... Sea temperatures in many tropical regions have increased by almost 1 degrees C over the past 100 years, and are currently increasing at similar to 1-2 degrees C per century. Coral bleaching occurs when the thermal tolerance of corals and their photosynthetic symbionts (zooxanthellae) is exceeded. Mass coral bleaching has occurred in association with episodes of elevated sea temperatures over the past 20 years and involves the loss of the zooxanthellae following chronic photoinhibition. Mass bleaching has resulted in significant losses of live coral in many parts of the world. This paper considers the biochemical, physiological and ecological perspectives of coral bleaching. It also uses the outputs of four runs from three models of global climate change which simulate changes in sea temperature and hence how the frequency and intensity of bleaching events will change over the next 100 years. The results suggest that the thermal tolerances of reef-building corals are likely to be exceeded every year within the next few decades. Events as severe as the 1998 event, the worst on record, are likely to become commonplace within 20 years. Most information suggests that the capacity for acclimation by corals has already been exceeded, and that adaptation will be too slow to avert a decline in the quality of the world's reefs. The rapidity of the changes that are predicted indicates a major problem for tropical marine ecosystems and suggests that unrestrained warming cannot occur without the loss and degradation of coral reefs on a global scale. read more read less

Topics:

Coral bleaching (73%)73% related to the paper, Resilience of coral reefs (68%)68% related to the paper, Aquaculture of coral (68%)68% related to the paper, Elkhorn coral (66%)66% related to the paper, Environmental issues with coral reefs (65%)65% related to the paper
3,462 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/MF14173
How much wetland has the world lost? Long-term and recent trends in global wetland area

Abstract:

It has been frequently stated, but without provision of supporting evidence, that the world has lost 50% of its wetlands (or 50% since 1900 AD). This review of 189 reports of change in wetland area finds that the reported long-term loss of natural wetlands averages between 54–57% but loss may have been as high as 87% since 17... It has been frequently stated, but without provision of supporting evidence, that the world has lost 50% of its wetlands (or 50% since 1900 AD). This review of 189 reports of change in wetland area finds that the reported long-term loss of natural wetlands averages between 54–57% but loss may have been as high as 87% since 1700 AD. There has been a much (3.7 times) faster rate of wetland loss during the 20th and early 21st centuries, with a loss of 64–71% of wetlands since 1900 AD. Losses have been larger and faster for inland than coastal natural wetlands. Although the rate of wetland loss in Europe has slowed, and in North America has remained low since the 1980s, the rate has remained high in Asia, where large-scale and rapid conversion of coastal and inland natural wetlands is continuing. It is unclear whether the investment by national governments in the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands has influenced these rates of loss. There is a need to improve the knowledge of change in wetland areas worldwide, particularly for Africa, the Neotropics and Oceania, and to improve the consistency of data on change in wetland areas in published papers and reports. read more read less

Topics:

Ramsar Convention (56%)56% related to the paper, Wetland (55%)55% related to the paper
829 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/MF9900199
Methods of Assessing Ovarian development in Fishes: a Review

Abstract:

An important component of many studies of fish reproductive biology is the assessment of the stage of gonad development of individual fish. The methods in use vary from highly detailed to cursory, but there are few reviews of their reliability or usefulness. This review examines histology, measurements of oocyte size, staging... An important component of many studies of fish reproductive biology is the assessment of the stage of gonad development of individual fish. The methods in use vary from highly detailed to cursory, but there are few reviews of their reliability or usefulness. This review examines histology, measurements of oocyte size, staging based on the appearance of whole oocytes, staging based on the external appearance of the ovary, and gonad indices. Histology is the most accurate technique, but it is time- consuming and expensive. Staging based on the appearance of whole oocytes can be a useful alternative but may be inaccurate with oocytes in transitional stages of development. Staging based on the external appearance of the ovary is the simplest and most rapid method, but it may be subjective and its accuracy is uncertain. Oocyte size may be used as a predictor of developmental stage if the size ranges of the various stages are known, but the sizes of different oocyte stages may overlap, which complicates this approach. Oocyte size may be used on its own to measure development but gives little information on the physiological status of the ovaries. Gonad indices (gonad size relative to body size) provide a useful insight into changes in ovary size and complement results obtained using staging methods. However, gonad indices, like oocyte size, may be biased when samples of fish of different body sizes are compared. read more read less

Topics:

Gonad (51%)51% related to the paper
756 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/MF94161
Flow variability and the ecology of large rivers

Abstract:

Ecological processes in large rivers are controlled by their flow variability. However, it is difficult to find measures of hydrological variability that characterize groups of rivers and can also be used to generate hypotheses about their ecology. Multivariate analyses of the hydrographs of 52 rivers worldwide revealed disti... Ecological processes in large rivers are controlled by their flow variability. However, it is difficult to find measures of hydrological variability that characterize groups of rivers and can also be used to generate hypotheses about their ecology. Multivariate analyses of the hydrographs of 52 rivers worldwide revealed distinctive patterns of flow variability that were often correlated with climate. For example, there were groups of rivers that corresponded broadly with ‘tropical’ and ‘dryland’ climates. However, some rivers from continental climates occupy both extremes of this range, illustrating the limitations of simple classification. Individual rivers and groups of rivers may also have different hydrographic ‘signatures’, and attempts to combine measures of hydrological variability into indices mask biologically significant information. This paper identifies 11 relatively independent measures of hydrological variability that help categorize river types and are each associated with aspects of fish biology. Ways are suggested by which the Flood Pulse Concept can be expanded to encompass hydrological variability and accommodate differences among groups of rivers from different climatic regions. Such recognition of the complex role of hydrological variability enhances the value of the concept for river conservation, management and restoration. read more read less

Topics:

Flood pulse concept (52%)52% related to the paper
691 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1071/MF9910569
Beyond BACI: Experimental designs for detecting human environmental impacts on temporal variations in natural populations

Abstract:

Biological effects of environmental impacts are usually defined simplistically in terms of changes in the mean of some biological variable. Many types of impact do not necessarily change long-run mean abundances. Here, designs for detection of environmental impact are reviewed and some of their shortcomings noted. New samplin... Biological effects of environmental impacts are usually defined simplistically in terms of changes in the mean of some biological variable. Many types of impact do not necessarily change long-run mean abundances. Here, designs for detection of environmental impact are reviewed and some of their shortcomings noted. New sampling designs to detect impacts that cause changes in temporal variance in abundance of populations, rather than their means, are described. These designs are effective at distinguishing pulse and press episodes of disturbance and could be used for other variables of interest (size, reproductive state, rate of growth, number of species, etc.) for monitoring. The designs require sampling different time-scales before and after a proposed development that might cause impact. Cases are discussed in which there is a single control location. Inadequacies of this approach for detection of environmental impact are mentioned, with some discussion of the consequences for management of impacts that cause temporal change rather than alterations of the mean abundance of a population. read more read less

Topics:

Population (53%)53% related to the paper
634 Citations
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SciSpace is a very innovative solution to the formatting problem and existing providers, such as Mendeley or Word did not really evolve in recent years.

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With SciSpace, you do not need a word template for Marine and Freshwater Research.

It automatically formats your research paper to CSIRO Publishing formatting guidelines and citation style.

You can download a submission ready research paper in pdf, LaTeX and docx formats.

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Time taken to format a paper and Compliance with guidelines

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SciSpace allows imports from all reference managers like Mendeley, Zotero, Endnote, Google Scholar etc.

Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Marine and Freshwater Research guidelines and autoformat it.

Yes. The template is fully compliant as per the guidelines of this journal. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. Also, if there's any update in the journal format guidelines, we take care of it and include that in our algorithm.

Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Marine and Freshwater Research citation style.

You can avail our Free Trial for 7 days. I'm sure you'll find our features very helpful. Plus, it's quite inexpensive.

Yup. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word doc and click on auto-format. You'll have a publish-ready paper that you can download at the end.

A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Marine and Freshwater Research's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

SciSpace is an online tool for now. We'll soon release a desktop version. You can also request (or upvote) any feature that you think might be helpful for you and the research community in the feature request section once you sign-up with us.

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it up and running within a matter of 3 working days. You can find the request box in the Journal Gallery on the right sidebar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for?".

After you have written and autoformatted your paper, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx and LaTeX.

To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

Our journal submission experts are skilled in submitting papers to various international journals.

After uploading your paper on SciSpace, you would see a button to request a journal submission service for Marine and Freshwater Research.

Each submission service is completed within 4 - 5 working days.

Yes. SciSpace provides this functionality.

After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Marine and Freshwater Research Endnote style, according to csiro-publishing guidelines.

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