Example of Biological Invasions format
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Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format
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Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format Example of Biological Invasions format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 13873547 e-ISSN: 15731464

Biological Invasions — Template for authors

Publisher: Springer
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics #74 of 647 -
Ecology #48 of 400 down down by 5 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 1003 Published Papers | 5614 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 14/07/2020
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Top papers
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

3.087

7% from 2018

Impact factor for Biological Invasions from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.087
2018 2.897
2017 3.054
2016 2.473
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 7% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

5.6

2% from 2019

CiteRatio for Biological Invasions from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 5.6
2019 5.5
2018 5.2
2017 5.3
2016 4.8
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.167

5% from 2019

SJR for Biological Invasions from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.167
2019 1.232
2018 1.272
2017 1.514
2016 1.349
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 5% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.297

2% from 2019

SNIP for Biological Invasions from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.297
2019 1.269
2018 1.337
2017 1.35
2016 1.214
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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Biological Invasions

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Springer

Biological Invasions

Biological Invasions publishes research and synthesis papers on patterns and processes of biological invasions in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine (including brackish) ecosystems. Also of interest are scholarly papers on management and policy issues as they relate to conser...... Read More

Ecology

Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Environmental Science

i
Last updated on
14 Jul 2020
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ISSN
1387-3547
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Impact Factor
High - 1.236
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Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
SPBASIC
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al, 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder GE, Tinkham M, Klapwijk TM (1982) Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys Rev B 25(7):4515_x0015_ 4532, URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1023/A:1010086329619
Positive interactions of nonindigenous species: invasional meltdown?
Daniel Simberloff1, Betsy Von Holle1
01 Jan 1999 - Biological Invasions

Abstract:

Study of interactions between pairs or larger groups of nonindigenous species has been subordinated in the literature to study of interactions between nonindigenous and native species. To the extent that interactions among introduced species are depicted at all, the emphasis has been on negative interactions, primarily resour... Study of interactions between pairs or larger groups of nonindigenous species has been subordinated in the literature to study of interactions between nonindigenous and native species. To the extent that interactions among introduced species are depicted at all, the emphasis has been on negative interactions, primarily resource competition and interference. However, a literature search reveals that introduced species frequently interact with one another and that facilitative interactions are at least as common as detrimental ones. The population significance of these interactions has rarely been determined, but a great variety of types of direct and indirect interactions among individuals of different nonindigenous species is observed, and many are plausibly believed to have consequences at the population level. In particular, mutualisms between plants and the animals that disperse and/or pollinate them and modification of habitat by both animals and plants seem common and often important in facilitating invasions. There is little evidence that interference among introduced species at levels currently observed significantly impedes further invasions, and synergistic interactions among invaders may well lead to accelerated impacts on native ecosystems ‐ an invasional ‘meltdown’ process. read more read less

Topics:

Population (55%)55% related to the paper, Introduced species (53%)53% related to the paper
1,860 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1023/A:1010034312781
Impact: Toward a Framework for Understanding the Ecological Effects of Invaders
Ingrid M. Parker1, Daniel Simberloff2, Karen Goodell3, Marjorie J. Wonham4, B. Von Holle5, L. Goldwasser
01 Jan 1999 - Biological Invasions

Abstract:

Although ecologists commonly talk about the impacts of nonindigenous species, little formal attention has been given to defining what we mean by impact, or connecting ecological theory with particular measures of impact. The resulting lack of generalizations regarding invasion impacts is more than an academic problem; we need... Although ecologists commonly talk about the impacts of nonindigenous species, little formal attention has been given to defining what we mean by impact, or connecting ecological theory with particular measures of impact. The resulting lack of generalizations regarding invasion impacts is more than an academic problem; we need to be able to distinguish invaders with minor effects from those with large effects in order to prioritize management efforts. This paper focuses on defining, evaluating, and comparing a variety of measures of impact drawn from empirical examples and theoretical reasoning. We begin by arguing that the total impact of an invader includes three fundamental dimensions: range, abundance, and the per-capita or per-biomass effect of the invader. Then we summarize previous approaches to measuring impact at different organizational levels, and suggest some new approaches. Reviewing mathematical models of impact, we argue that theoretical studies using community assembly models could act as a basis for better empirical studies and monitoring programs, as well as provide a clearer understanding of the relationship among different types of impact. We then discuss some of the particular challenges that come from the need to prioritize invasive species in a management or policy context. We end with recommendations about how the field of invasion biology might proceed in order to build a general framework for understanding and predicting impacts. In particular, we advocate studies designed to explore the correlations among different measures: Are the results of complex multivariate methods adequately captured by simple composite metrics such as species richness? How well are impacts on native populations correlated with impacts on ecosystem functions? Are there useful bioindicators for invasion impacts? To what extent does the impact of an invasive species depend on the system in which it is measured? Three approaches would provide new insights in this line of inquiry: (1) studies that measure impacts at multiple scales and multiple levels of organization, (2) studies that synthesize currently available data on different response variables, and (3) models designed to guide empirical work and explore generalities. read more read less
1,726 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10530-005-3735-Y
Propagule pressure: a null model for biological invasions
Robert I. Colautti1, Igor A. Grigorovich1, Hugh J. MacIsaac1
23 Jan 2006 - Biological Invasions

Abstract:

Invasion ecology has been criticised for its lack of general principles. To explore this criticism, we conducted a meta-analysis that examined characteristics of invasiveness (i.e. the ability of species to establish in, spread to, or become abundant in novel communities) and invasibility (i.e. the susceptibility of habitats ... Invasion ecology has been criticised for its lack of general principles. To explore this criticism, we conducted a meta-analysis that examined characteristics of invasiveness (i.e. the ability of species to establish in, spread to, or become abundant in novel communities) and invasibility (i.e. the susceptibility of habitats to the establishment or proliferation of invaders). There were few consistencies among invasiveness characteristics (3 of 13): established and abundant invaders generally occupy similar habitats as native species, while abundant species tend to be less affected by enemies; germination success and reproductive output were significantly positively associated with invasiveness when results from both stages (establishment/spread and abundance/impact) were combined. Two of six invasibility characteristics were also significant: communities experiencing more disturbance and with higher resource availability sustained greater establishment and proliferation of invaders. We also found that even though ‘propagule pressure’ was considered in only ~29% of studies, it was a significant predictor of both invasiveness and invasibility (55 of 64 total cases). Given that nonindigenous species are likely introduced non-randomly, we contend that ‘propagule biases’ may confound current paradigms in invasion ecology. Examples of patterns that could be confounded by propagule biases include characteristics of good invaders and susceptible habitats, release from enemies, evolution of ‘invasiveness’, and invasional meltdown. We conclude that propagule pressure should serve as the basis of a null model for studies of biological invasions when inferring process from patterns of invasion. read more read less

Topics:

Propagule pressure (69%)69% related to the paper, Propagule (58%)58% related to the paper
View PDF
843 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10530-011-9963-4
Use of niche models in invasive species risk assessments.
12 Feb 2011 - Biological Invasions

Abstract:

Risk maps summarizing landscape suitability of novel areas for invading species can be valuable tools for preventing species’ invasions or controlling their spread, but methods employed for development of such maps remain variable and unstandardized. We discuss several considerations in development of such models, including t... Risk maps summarizing landscape suitability of novel areas for invading species can be valuable tools for preventing species’ invasions or controlling their spread, but methods employed for development of such maps remain variable and unstandardized. We discuss several considerations in development of such models, including types of distributional information that should be used, the nature of explanatory variables that should be incorporated, and caveats regarding model testing and evaluation. We highlight that, in the case of invasive species, such distributional predictions should aim to derive the best hypothesis of the potential distribution of the species by using (1) all distributional information available, including information from both the native range and other invaded regions; (2) predictors linked as directly as is feasible to the physiological requirements of the species; and (3) modelling procedures that carefully avoid overfitting to the training data. Finally, model testing and evaluation should focus on well-predicted presences, and less on efficient prediction of absences; a k-fold regional cross-validation test is discussed. read more read less
568 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S10530-008-9318-Y
Ecological effects of invasive alien insects
01 Jan 2009 - Biological Invasions

Abstract:

A literature survey identified 403 primary research publications that investigated the ecological effects of invasive alien insects and/or the mechanisms underlying these effects. The majority of these studies were published in the last 8 years and nearly two-thirds were carried out in North America. These publications concer... A literature survey identified 403 primary research publications that investigated the ecological effects of invasive alien insects and/or the mechanisms underlying these effects. The majority of these studies were published in the last 8 years and nearly two-thirds were carried out in North America. These publications concerned 72 invasive insect species, of which two ant species, Solenopsis invicta and Linepithema humile, accounted for 18% and 14% of the studies, respectively. Most publications investigated effects on native biodiversity at population or community level. Genetic effects and, to a lesser extent, effects on ecosystem services and processes were rarely explored. We review the effects caused by different insect invaders according to: their ecosystem roles, i.e. herbivores, predators, parasites, parasitoids and pollinators; the level of biological organisation at which they occur; and the direct and indirect mechanisms underlying these effects. The best documented effects occur in invasive ants, Eurasian forest herbivores invasive in North America, and honeybees. Impacts may occur through simple trophic interactions such as herbivory, predation or parasitism. Alien species may also affect native species and communities through more complex mechanisms such as competition for resources, disease transmission, apparent competition, or pollination disruption, among others. Finally, some invasive insects, particularly forest herbivores and ants, are known to affect ecosystem processes through cascading effects. We identify biases and gaps in our knowledge of ecological effects of invasive insects and suggest further opportunities for research. read more read less

Topics:

Introduced species (58%)58% related to the paper, Linepithema (53%)53% related to the paper, Population (53%)53% related to the paper, Literature survey (52%)52% related to the paper, Trophic level (52%)52% related to the paper
566 Citations
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Biological Invasions format uses SPBASIC citation style.

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Frequently asked questions

Absolutely not! With our tool, you can freely write without having to focus on LaTeX. You can write your entire paper as per the Biological Invasions guidelines and autoformat it.

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Sure. We support all the top citation styles like APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, Chicago style, etc. For example, in case of this journal, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, it will automatically update your article as per the Biological Invasions citation style.

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A matter of seconds. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves a load of your time in writing and formating your manuscript.

One little Google search can get you the Word template for any journal. However, why do you need a Word template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace, autoformat it as per Biological Invasions's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Try us out!.

Absolutely! You can do it using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, you can always contact our support team.

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To be honest, the answer is NO. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of those factors the review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, Eigenfactor, etc. You must assess all the factors and then take the final call.

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We have extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help our researchers understand the access level of this journal. The following table indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
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After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or .bib file.

SciSpace would allow download of your references in Biological Invasions Endnote style, according to springer guidelines.

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