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Journal ArticleDOI

Contextualizing the Quebec Charter of Values: Belonging without Citizenship in Quebec

22 Mar 2015-Canadian Ethnic Studies (Canadian Ethnic Studies Association)-Vol. 47, Iss: 1, pp 41-60
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors argue that this shortlived incursion into more exclusionary politics are the direct result of a variety of factors that go beyond standard normative principles usually attributed to citizenship and actually reflect structural difficulties associated with Quebec's status as an unrecognized minority nation.
Abstract: Did the introduction of the Charter of Quebec Values in September 2013 signal a repudiation of Quebec's longstanding consensus on liberal-pluralism in its dominant integration model? While the Charter died as a result of the election defeat of the minority Parti Quebecols government In May, 2014, its salience and impact continues to be felt, in that it has moved the normative benchmarks around ethnocultural and ethno-religious diversity and represents a qualitatively new framework for regulating the terms of belonging in Quebec. This paper, however, contends that such a reading of the legacy of the Charter misses a significant part of the story. A broader contextual overview reveals that recent events in Quebec are conditioned by variables associated with the unfinished nature of a constitutive project for national integration. Regardless of whether or not the proposed Charter signaled a permanent normative turn in Quebec, or merely an intensification and greater polarization of an interminable argument, this paper will attempt to provide some context with which to interpret this 'trial balloon' of the minority Parti Quebecois government in power from 2012-2014. I argue that this short-lived incursion into more exclusionary politics are the direct result of a variety of factors that go beyond standard normative principles usually attributed to citizenship and actually reflect structural difficulties associated with Quebec's status as an unrecognized minority nation. The article will proceed to highlight the primary Identity-forging Initiatives undertaken by Quebec in lieu of citizenship, and conclude with some reflections on some distortions that may be attributable to a protracted, frustrated and unfinished constitutive journey. Resume L'introduction de la Charte des Valeurs du Quebec en Septembre 2013 aurait-elle signifie le renoncement d'un consensus de longue date du Quebec au pluralisme liberal dans son modele d'integration dominante? Bien que l'arret de la Charte alt eu pour resultat la defaite du Parti quebecois devenu minoritaire au gouvernement pendant les electlons de mai 2014, son importance et son impact continuent de se faire sentir, dans le sens ou elle a deplace les reperes normatifs autour de la diversite ethnoculturelle et ethno--religieuse; et represente une structure qui reglementer qualitativement les conditions d'appartenance au Quebec. Toutefois, cet article tente de s'opposer a une telle lecture de l'heritage de la Charte qui semble avoir omis une importante partie de l'histoire. Une approche contextuelle plus large revele que les evenements recents au Quebec ont ete conditionnes par les variables associees a la nature inachevee du projet constitute de l'integration nationale. Peu importe si oui ou non le projet de Charte a marque un tournant normatif permanent au Quebec, ou simplement une intensification et une plus grande polarisation d'un argument interminable, cet article va tenter de fournir un contexte avec lequel interpreter ce > de la minorite du Parti quebecois au pouvoir dans le gouvernement de 2012-2014. Je postule que cette incursion de courte duree dans la politique d'exclusion sont plus le resultat direct d'une variete de facteurs qui vont au-dela des principes normatifs standards generalement attribues a la citoyennete et fait reflechir a des difficultes structurelles liees au statut du Quebec comme une nation minoritaire non reconnue. L'article va proceder a mettre l'accent sur les initiatives de renforcement d'identites primaires forgees, entrepris par le Quebec en lieu et place de la citoyennete, et de conclure avec quelques reflexions sur certaines distorsions qul pourraient etre attribuables a un periple constitutif prolonge, frustrant et inacheve. INTRODUCTION From French-Canadian survivance to Quebecois national integration, the road to citizenship in Quebec has been a fascinating study in collective introspection. …
Citations
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Dissertation
30 Oct 2019
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a list of table-based and table-augmented versions of the Table of Tableaux and Table of Figures (TableAUX).
Abstract: ........................................................................................................................................... II TABLE DES MATIÈRES ...................................................................................................................... III LISTE DES TABLEAUX ...................................................................................................................... IX LISTE DES FIGURES ............................................................................................................................ X REMERCIEMENTS ............................................................................................................................. XI

43 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors found that holding liberal values is associated with support for restrictions on the wearing of minority religious symbols in Quebec, but not with opposition to such restrictions in the rest of Canada, which may explain Quebecers' greater support for such restrictions.
Abstract: Proponents of restrictions on the wearing of religious symbols in public institutions in Quebec have often framed their support in the language of liberalism, with references to “gender equality”, “state neutrality” and “freedom of conscience”. However, efforts to account for support for restrictions on minority religious symbols rarely mention liberalism. In this article, we test the hypothesis that holding liberal values might have different attitudinal consequences in Quebec and the rest of Canada. Our findings demonstrate that holding liberal values is associated with support for restrictions on the wearing of minority religious symbols in Quebec, but it is associated with opposition to such restrictions in the rest of Canada. Moreover, this difference between Quebec and the rest of Canada in the relationship between liberal values and support for restrictions on minority religious symbols can explain Quebecers' greater support for restrictions.

29 citations

References
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Journal ArticleDOI
Engin F. Isin1
TL;DR: The rise of the neurotic subject has been discussed in this paper, where the authors argue that the rational subject has itself been predicated upon and accompanied by another subject: the neuroptic subject, which is the object of various governmental projects whose conduct is based not merely on calculating rationalities but also arises from and responds to fears, anxieties and insecurities.
Abstract: Over the last three decades we have witnessed the birth of a subject that has constituted the foundations of a regime change in state societies: the neoliberal subject. As much as neoliberalism came to mean the withdrawal of the state from certain arenas, the decline of social citizenship, privatization, downloading, and so forth, it also meant, if not predicated upon, the production of an image of the subject as sufficient, calculating, responsible, autonomous, and unencumbered. While the latter point has been a topic of debate concerning the rational subject, I wish to argue that the rational subject has itself been predicated upon and accompanied by another subject: the neurotic subject. More recently, it is this neurotic subject that has become the object of various governmental projects whose conduct is based not merely on calculating rationalities but also arises from and responds to fears, anxieties and insecurities, which I consider as ‘governing through neurosis’. The rise of the neurotic citizen...

353 citations

Book
24 Oct 2011
TL;DR: Maclure and Taylor as discussed by the authors argue that in our ever more religiously diverse, politically interconnected world, Secularism, properly understood, may offer the only path to religious and philosophical freedom.
Abstract: Secularism: the definition of this word is as practical and urgent as income inequalities or the paths to sustainable development. In this wide-ranging analysis, Jocelyn Maclure and Charles Taylor provide a clearly reasoned, articulate account of the two main principles of secularism--equal respect, and freedom of conscience--and its two operative modes--separation of Church (or mosque or temple) and State, and State neutrality vis-a-vis religions. But more crucially, they make the powerful argument that in our ever more religiously diverse, politically interconnected world, secularism, properly understood, may offer the only path to religious and philosophical freedom. Secularism and Freedom of Conscience grew out of a very real problem--Quebec's need for guidelines to balance the equal respect due to all citizens with the right to religious freedom. But the authors go further, rethinking secularism in light of other critical issues of our time. The relationship between religious beliefs and deeply-held secular convictions, the scope of the free exercise of religion, and the place of religion in the public sphere are aspects of the larger challenge Maclure and Taylor address: how to manage moral and religious diversity in a free society. Secularism, they show, is essential to any liberal democracy in which citizens adhere to a plurality of conceptions of what gives meaning and direction to human life. The working model the authors construct in this nuanced account is capacious enough to accommodate difference and freedom of conscience, while holding out hope for a world in which diversity no longer divides us.

212 citations

Book
07 Feb 2011
TL;DR: Taylor's "A Secular Age" as discussed by the authors explores the continuity of religion from the past into the future; the nature of the secular; the folly of hoping to live by'reason alone'; and the perils of moralism.
Abstract: There are, always, more things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in one's philosophy - and in these essays Charles Taylor turns to those things not fully imagined or avenues not wholly explored in his epochal "A Secular Age." Here Taylor talks in detail about thinkers who are his allies and interlocutors, such as Iris Murdoch, Alasdair MacIntyre, Robert Brandom, and Paul Celan. He offers major contributions to social theory, expanding on the issues of nationalism, democratic exclusionism, religious mobilizations, and modernity. And he delves even more deeply into themes taken up in "A Secular Age": the continuity of religion from the past into the future; the nature of the secular; the folly of hoping to live by 'reason alone'; and, the perils of moralism. He also speculates on how irrationality emerges from the heart of rationality itself, and why violence breaks out again and again. In "A Secular Age," Taylor more evidently foregrounded his Catholic faith, and there are several essays here that further explore that faith. Overall, this is a hopeful book, showing how, while acknowledging the force of religion and the persistence of violence and folly, we nonetheless have the power to move forward once we have given up the brittle pretensions of a narrow rationalism.

85 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines stateless nationalist and regionalist parties' (SNRPs) conceptions of citizenship and immigration and finds that although SNRPs have advocated civic definitions of the region and welcome immigration as a tool to increase the regional population, some parties have also levied certain conditions on immigrants' full participation in the regional society and political life as a means to protect the minority culture of the regions.
Abstract: Citizenship is usually regarded as the exclusive domain of the state. However, changes to the structure of states resulting from decentralisation and globalisation have required a re-conceptualisation of citizenship, as authority is dispersed, identities multiply and political entitlements vary across territorial levels. Decentralisation has endowed regions with control over a wide range of areas relating to welfare entitlements, education and cultural integration that were once controlled by the state. This has created a new form of ‘regional citizenship’ based on rights, participation and membership at the regional level. The question of who does or does not belong to a region has become a highly politicised question. In particular, this article examines stateless nationalist and regionalist parties' (SNRPs) conceptions of citizenship and immigration. Given that citizenship marks a distinction between members and outsiders of a political community, immigration is a key tool for deciding who is allowed to become a citizen. Case study findings on Scotland, Quebec and Catalonia reveal that although SNRPs have advocated civic definitions of the region and welcome immigration as a tool to increase the regional population, some parties have also levied certain conditions on immigrants' full participation in the regional society and political life as a means to protect the minority culture of the region.

73 citations

Book
01 Jan 2007
TL;DR: The politics of contestation in Quebec has been studied in the context of Canadian Citizenship and Citizenship Discourse in this article and Citizenship and Democracy: Negotiating Membership The Political Sociology of Citizenship Multinational Democracies Citizenship and Multinationalism in Canada The Road Ahead 6 Contemporary Challenges and the Future of Canada Consolidation of the Present Constitutional Order The High Road Notes Index Index
Abstract: Acknowledgments 1 Introduction: Exploring Multinationalism 2 Historical Foundations and Evolving Constitutional Orders: The Politics of Contestation in Quebec Multinationalism and Diversity Constitution, Political Community, and Society The First Constitutional Order A Period of Transition: 1960s to 1982 A New Constitutional Order: Patriation in 1982 and the Social Union Framework Agreement Setting the Scene 3 The Federal Principle in Canada: Multifaceted Conceptions of Representation Understanding the Federal Idea Pre-Confederation: The Seeds of a Federal State Competing Federal Visions Conclusion 4 Distinct 'National Models' of Integration: Establishing Contexts of Choice Multiculturalism versus Homogeneous Citizenship 'Interculturalism': Quebec's Model of Cultural Pluralism Canada's Policy of Multiculturalism Concurrent Nation-Building Strategies Citizenship Discourse in Quebec: Societal Culture at Work 5 Citizenship and Democracy: Negotiating Membership The Political Sociology of Citizenship Multinational Democracies Citizenship and Multinationalism in Canada The Road Ahead 6 Contemporary Challenges and the Future of Canada Consolidation of the Present Constitutional Order The High Road Notes Index

61 citations