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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1080/09669582.2020.1835933

Justice and ethics: towards a new platform for tourism and sustainability

04 Mar 2021-Journal of Sustainable Tourism (Routledge)-Vol. 29, pp 143-157
Abstract: In times of upheaval and uncertainty justice has come to the fore as a key principle to guide tourism development and policy. Justice is being sought by individuals, groups and societies, as vulner...

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Topics: Economic Justice (60%), Tourism (55%), Sustainability (50%)
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Open access
01 Jan 1982-
Abstract: Introduction 1. Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle 2. Images of Relationship 3. Concepts of Self and Morality 4. Crisis and Transition 5. Women's Rights and Women's Judgment 6. Visions of Maturity References Index of Study Participants General Index

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Topics: Psychological Theory (60%)

7,539 Citations



Open access
Géraldine Brausch1Institutions (1)
01 Oct 2012-

232 Citations


Open accessJournal Article
01 Jan 2008-Tourism Analysis
Topics: Tourism (67%), Developing country (50%)

159 Citations


Open accessJournal Article
Abstract: Raoul Bianchi, Marcus Stephenson (2013). Tourism and Citizenship: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities in the Global Order. London and New York: Routledge, 280 pages. ISBN 978-0-415-70738-1At a time when it seems that we "are living in an increasingly mobile world and that international travel has become more 'democratic'" (p. 2), a book that challenges these assumptions in the light of recent global changes and increasingly complex and unequal cross-border movements seems appropriate. By examining human mobility through the lens of global citizenship, the book illustrates the different flows of international travel and the consequences for the ways in which understanding of citizenship is imagined, reconstructed and institutionalized. The authors contend that "international travel represents a quintessential expression of a more democratic, mobile and inclusive world order of consumer citizens" (p.3). In its place, they consider these changes in citizenship definitions and practices to be caused by a range of factors that go beyond static rights and duties controlled and enforced within a geo-political framework and challenge the libertarian stance that participating in international tourism is an indicator of a 'civilized life' or (global) citizenship. After a comprehensive introduction the book commences with six chapters to illustrate the manifold relationships between tourism and citizenship, with a particular focus on the alignments between the right to freedom of movement and the right to travel.Chapter 1 presents a comprehensive overview of the main concepts and theoretical viewpoints that have historically framed our understandings of citizenship. By using Marshall's modern conception of citizenship as a starting point, the chapter shows how the expansion of leisure and travel was closely tied to state interventions and social programs that underpinned leisure and travel as social rights and citizenship benefits to be enjoyed by all members. However, from the 1980s onwards the role of the state as benevolent protector has become progressively undermined and transformed by an emergent neoliberal agenda, which "fuelled the commodification of leisure and 'free time' and the shift toward more market-oriented tourism provision" (p. 35). Consequently, the chapter illustrates how the 'marketization of tourism' nowadays has overshadowed the social dimension of travel to a point at which the provision of subsidized or low-cost leisure and travel is perceived as a market distortion and a potential risk for economic growth and development.Chapter 2 continues with a thorough analysis of the transformation of citizenship from a modern liberal conception "anchored within the confines of the sovereign territorial nationstate towards a much more fluid and multilayered set of ideas informed and constituted within a variety of post-national discourses of cosmopolitanism, cultural rights and multicultural citizenship" (p. 46). The chapter brings forward 'mobile citizenship' as a framework through which to understand the various ways in which tourism has become a major feature of global mobility and transnational notions of citizenship, realigning the balance of rights and duties beyond the traditional confines of the nation state. Drawing on several examples and recent studies, the chapter illustrates that the rapid globalization of capital and markets has major implications for the expansive nature of mobility and freedom, especially noticeably in the emergence of 'new' global elite classes. Conversely, the authors give a sharp account of the growing population of so-called 'nontourists', those residing within national boundaries that are immobile and/or stateless. Bearing in mind the effect of international tourism on these opposing groups, they argue that the capacity to be mobile does not instantly translate to notions of global citizenship or cosmopolitanism; instead they advocate the acknowledgement of flexible citizenship or more rooted forms of cosmopolitanism. …

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Topics: Citizenship (63%), Good citizenship (63%), Global citizenship (61%) ... read more

24 Citations


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67 results found


Open accessBook
01 Jan 1999-
Abstract: In Development as Freedom Amartya Sen quotes the eighteenth century poet William Cowper on freedom: Freedom has a thousand charms to show, That slaves howe'er contented, never know. Sen explains how in a world of unprecedented increase in overall opulence, millions of people living in rich and poor countries are still unfree. Even if they are not technically slaves, they are denied elementary freedom and remain imprisoned in one way or another by economic poverty, social deprivation, political tyranny or cultural authoritarianism. The main purpose of development is to spread freedom and its 'thousand charms' to the unfree citizens. Freedom, Sen persuasively argues, is at once the ultimate goal of social and economic arrangements and the most efficient means of realizing general welfare. Social institutions like markets, political parties, legislatures, the judiciary, and the media contribute to development by enhancing individual freedom and are in turn sustained by social values. Values, institutions, development, and freedom are all closely interrelated, and Sen links them together in an elegant analytical framework. By asking "What is the relation between our collective economic wealth and our individual ability to live as we would like?" and by incorporating individual freedom as a social commitment into his analysis, Sen allows economics once again, as it did in the time of Adam Smith, to address the social basis of individual well-being and freedom.

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Topics: Index of Economic Freedom (61%), Authoritarianism (59%), Capability approach (53%) ... read more

19,074 Citations


Open access
01 Jan 1982-

11,174 Citations


Open accessBook
01 Jan 1990-
Abstract: This book challenges the prevailing philosophical reduction of social justice to distributive justice. It critically analyzes basic concepts underlying most theories of justice, including impartiality, formal equality, and the unitary moral subjectivity. Starting from claims of excluded groups about decision making, cultural expression, and division of labor, Iris Young defines concepts of domination and oppression to cover issues eluding the distributive model. Democratic theorists, according to Young do not adequately address the problem of an inclusive participatory framework. By assuming a homogeneous public, they fail to consider institutional arrangements for including people not culturally identified with white European male norms of reason and respectability. Young urges that normative theory and public policy should undermine group-based oppression by affirming rather than suppressing social group difference. Basing her vision of the good society on the differentiated, culturally plural network of contemporary urban life, she argues for a principle of group representation in democratic publics and for group-differentiated policies. "This is an innovative work, an important contribution to feminist theory and political thought, and one of the most impressive statements of the relationship between postmodernist critiques of universalism and concrete thinking.... Iris Young makes the most convincing case I know of for the emancipatory implications of postmodernism." --Seyla Benhabib, State University of New York at Stony Brook

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Topics: Distributive justice (59%), Economic Justice (57%), Impartiality (56%) ... read more

7,583 Citations


Open access
01 Jan 1982-
Abstract: Introduction 1. Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle 2. Images of Relationship 3. Concepts of Self and Morality 4. Crisis and Transition 5. Women's Rights and Women's Judgment 6. Visions of Maturity References Index of Study Participants General Index

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Topics: Psychological Theory (60%)

7,539 Citations


Open accessBook
16 Mar 2010-

6,080 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
202119
20181
20171
20151
20121
20081