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Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format Example of Coral Reefs format
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Coral Reefs — Template for authors

Publisher: Springer
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Aquatic Science #16 of 224 up up by 13 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 470 Published Papers | 2727 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 29/06/2020
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Related Journals

open access Open Access

Hindawi

Quality:  
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CiteRatio: 3.1
SJR: 0.429
SNIP: 1.331
open access Open Access

Oxford University Press

Quality:  
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CiteRatio: 3.9
SJR: 0.87
SNIP: 0.911

NRC Research Press

Quality:  
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CiteRatio: 4.5
SJR: 1.09
SNIP: 1.085
open access Open Access

Frontiers Media

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 5.0
SJR: 1.558
SNIP: 1.437

Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.536

3% from 2018

Impact factor for Coral Reefs from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.536
2018 3.631
2017 3.095
2016 2.906
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

5.8

2% from 2019

CiteRatio for Coral Reefs from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 5.8
2019 5.7
2018 5.1
2017 4.6
2016 4.6
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 3% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 2% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.287

8% from 2019

SJR for Coral Reefs from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.287
2019 1.405
2018 1.463
2017 1.307
2016 1.371
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

1.051

11% from 2019

SNIP for Coral Reefs from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.051
2019 0.947
2018 0.971
2017 0.947
2016 1.014
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has increased by 11% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Coral Reefs

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Springer

Coral Reefs

The journal, Coral Reefs, is intended to be a focal point for multidisciplinary literature across the broad fields of reef studies. It publishes analytical and theoretical papers on both modern and ancient reefs, and encourages the search for theories about reef structure and ...... Read More

Aquatic Science

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

i
Last updated on
29 Jun 2020
i
ISSN
0722-4028
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.1
i
Open Access
No
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
SPBASIC
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al, 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder GE, Tinkham M, Klapwijk TM (1982) Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys Rev B 25(7):4515–4532, URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S003380050249
Coral bleaching: causes and consequences
Barbara E. Brown1
01 Dec 1997 - Coral Reefs

Abstract:

It has been over 10 years since the phenomenon of extensive coral bleaching was first described. In most cases bleaching has been attributed to elevated temperature, but other instances involving high solar irradiance, and sometimes disease, have also been documented. It is timely, in view of our concern about worldwide reef ... It has been over 10 years since the phenomenon of extensive coral bleaching was first described. In most cases bleaching has been attributed to elevated temperature, but other instances involving high solar irradiance, and sometimes disease, have also been documented. It is timely, in view of our concern about worldwide reef condition, to review knowledge of physical and biological factors involved in bleaching, the mechanisms of zooxanthellae and pigment loss, and the ecological consequences for coral communities. Here we evaluate recently acquired data on temperature and irradiance-induced bleaching, including long-term data sets which suggest that repeated bleaching events may be the consequence of a steadily rising background sea temperature that will in the future expose corals to an increasingly hostile environment. Cellular mechanisms of bleaching involve a variety of processes that include the degeneration of zooxanthellae in situ, release of zooxanthellae from mesenterial filaments and release of algae within host cells which become detached from the endoderm. Photo-protective defences (particularly carotenoid pigments) in zooxanthellae are likely to play an important role in limiting the bleaching response which is probably elicited by a combination of elevated temperature and irradiance in the field. The ability of corals to respond adaptively to recurrent bleaching episodes is not known, but preliminary evidence suggests that phenotypic responses of both corals and zooxanthellae may be significant. read more read less

Topics:

Coral bleaching (72%)72% related to the paper, Zooxanthellae (57%)57% related to the paper, Galaxea fascicularis (52%)52% related to the paper, Porites compressa (51%)51% related to the paper, Symbiodinium (50%)50% related to the paper
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1,329 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00303779
Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives
Peter W. Glynn1
01 Mar 1993 - Coral Reefs

Abstract:

Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of r... Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt physiologically or genetically to such marked and rapid temperature increases. read more read less

Topics:

Coral bleaching (75%)75% related to the paper, Resilience of coral reefs (67%)67% related to the paper, Hermatypic coral (63%)63% related to the paper, Coral reef (60%)60% related to the paper, Montipora digitata (56%)56% related to the paper
911 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S003380000086
Bleaching of corals on the Great Barrier Reef: differential susceptibilities among taxa
Paul Marshall1, Andrew H. Baird1
27 Jul 2000 - Coral Reefs

Abstract:

Large-scale coral bleaching episodes are potentially major disturbances to coral reef systems, yet a definitive picture of variation in assemblage response and species susceptibilities is still being compiled. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the bleaching response of 4160 coral colonies, representing 45 genera and 15 ... Large-scale coral bleaching episodes are potentially major disturbances to coral reef systems, yet a definitive picture of variation in assemblage response and species susceptibilities is still being compiled. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the bleaching response of 4160 coral colonies, representing 45 genera and 15 families, from two depths at four sites on reefs fringing inshore islands on the Great Barrier Reef. Six weeks after the onset of large-scale bleaching in 1998, between 11 and 83% of colonies along replicate transects were affected by bleaching, and mortality was 1 to 16%. There were significant differences in bleaching response between sites, depths and taxa. Cyphastrea, Turbinaria and Galaxea were relatively unaffected by bleaching, while most acroporids and pocilloporids were highly susceptible. The hydrocorals (Millepora spp.) were the most susceptible taxa, with 85% mortality. Spatial variation in assemblage response was linked to the taxonomic composition of reef sites and their bleaching history. We suggest, therefore, that much of the spatial variation in bleaching response was due to assemblage composition and thermal acclimation. read more read less

Topics:

Coral bleaching (65%)65% related to the paper, Turbinaria (coral) (57%)57% related to the paper, Fringing reef (57%)57% related to the paper, Coral reef (55%)55% related to the paper, Reef (54%)54% related to the paper
873 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/S003380000129
Competition between corals and algae on coral reefs : a review of evidence and mechanisms
Laurence J. McCook1, Jamaluddin Jompa1, Guillermo Diaz-Pulido1
01 May 2001 - Coral Reefs

Abstract:

Despite widespread acceptance that competition between scleractinian corals and benthic algae is important to the structure of coral reef communities, there is little direct experimental evidence that corals and algae do compete, and very little data on the processes and causality of their interactions. Most available evidenc... Despite widespread acceptance that competition between scleractinian corals and benthic algae is important to the structure of coral reef communities, there is little direct experimental evidence that corals and algae do compete, and very little data on the processes and causality of their interactions. Most available evidence is observational or correlative, with intrinsic risks of confounded causality. This paper reviews and categorises the available evidence, concluding that competition between corals and algae probably is widespread on coral reefs, but also that the interaction varies considerably. Widespread replacement of corals by algae may often indicate coral mortality due to external disturbances, rather than competitive overgrowth, but may lead to competitive inhibition of coral recruitment, with consequences for reef recovery. We list eight specific processes by which corals and algae may affect each other, and suggest life history properties that will influence which of these interactions are possible. We propose a matrix for algal effects on corals, which lists the subset of processes possible for each combination of coral life form and algal functional group. This table provides a preliminary framework for improved understanding and interpretation of coral-algal interactions. read more read less

Topics:

Hermatypic coral (66%)66% related to the paper, Coral reef (62%)62% related to the paper, Resilience of coral reefs (61%)61% related to the paper, Coral (57%)57% related to the paper, Reef (57%)57% related to the paper
870 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1007/BF00306135
Model of a coral reef ecosystem
Jeffrey J. Polovina1
01 Aug 1984 - Coral Reefs

Abstract:

The ECOPATH model for French Frigate Shoals estimates the benthic plant production (net primary production in kg wet weight) required to support the atoll food chain. In this section we estimate the benthic net primary production and net community production of the atoll based on metabolism studies of reef flat, knolls, and l... The ECOPATH model for French Frigate Shoals estimates the benthic plant production (net primary production in kg wet weight) required to support the atoll food chain. In this section we estimate the benthic net primary production and net community production of the atoll based on metabolism studies of reef flat, knolls, and lagoon communities at French Frigate Shoals Hawaii. Community metabolism was measured during winter and summer. The reef communities at French Frigate Shoals exhibited patterns and rates of organic carbon production and calcification similar to other reefs in the world. The estimate of net primary production is 6.1·106 kg wet weight km-2 year-1±50%, a value remarkably close to the estimate by the ECOPATH model of 4.3·106 kg wet weight km-2 year-1. Our estimate of net community production or the amount of carbon not consumed by the benthos was high; approximately 15% of the net primary production. Model results indicate that about 5% of net primary production is passed up the food chain to mobile predators. This suggests about 10% of net primary production (∼6% of gross primary production) may be permanently lost to the system via sediment burial or export offshore. read more read less

Topics:

Atoll (53%)53% related to the paper, Primary production (52%)52% related to the paper, Benthic zone (51%)51% related to the paper, Coral reef (51%)51% related to the paper
706 Citations
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Frequently asked questions

1. Can I write Coral Reefs in LaTeX?

Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Coral Reefs guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Coral Reefs guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Coral Reefs guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Coral Reefs?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Coral Reefs citation style.

4. Can I use the Coral Reefs templates for free?

Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Coral Reefs.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Coral Reefs that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Coral Reefs that you can download at the end.

6. How long does it usually take you to format my papers in Coral Reefs?

It only takes a matter of seconds to edit your manuscript. Besides that, our intuitive editor saves you from writing and formatting it in Coral Reefs.

7. Where can I find the template for the Coral Reefs?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Coral Reefs's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

8. Can I reformat my paper to fit the Coral Reefs's guidelines?

Of course! You can do this using our intuitive editor. It's very easy. If you need help, our support team is always ready to assist you.

9. Coral Reefs an online tool or is there a desktop version?

SciSpace's Coral Reefs is currently available as an online tool. We're developing a desktop version, too. You can request (or upvote) any features that you think would be helpful for you and other researchers in the "feature request" section of your account once you've signed up with us.

10. I cannot find my template in your gallery. Can you create it for me like Coral Reefs?

Sure. You can request any template and we'll have it setup within a few days. You can find the request box in Journal Gallery on the right side bar under the heading, "Couldn't find the format you were looking for like Coral Reefs?”

11. What is the output that I would get after using Coral Reefs?

After writing your paper autoformatting in Coral Reefs, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Coral Reefs's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Coral Reefs?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Coral Reefs. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Coral Reefs?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Coral Reefs are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Coral Reefs?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Coral Reefs's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Coral Reefs in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Coral Reefs Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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