Example of Journal of Small Business Management format
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Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format
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Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format Example of Journal of Small Business Management format
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open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

Journal of Small Business Management — Template for authors

Publisher: Wiley
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Business, Management and Accounting (all) #14 of 218 down down by 7 ranks
Strategy and Management #52 of 440 down down by 23 ranks
Management of Technology and Innovation #30 of 248 down down by 13 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 244 Published Papers | 1566 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 10/07/2020
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Related Journals

open access Open Access

SAGE

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 4.2
SJR: 2.315
SNIP: 1.802
open access Open Access

SAGE

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 3.4
SJR: 0.894
SNIP: 1.8
open access Open Access

SAGE

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 4.8
SJR: 1.908
SNIP: 2.066
open access Open Access
recommended Recommended

Springer

Quality:  
High
CiteRatio: 14.2
SJR: 4.819
SNIP: 4.02

Journal Performance & Insights

Impact Factor

CiteRatio

Determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

A measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

3.461

11% from 2018

Impact factor for Journal of Small Business Management from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.461
2018 3.12
2017 3.248
2016 2.876
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

6.4

8% from 2019

CiteRatio for Journal of Small Business Management from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 6.4
2019 5.9
2018 8.3
2017 6.3
2016 4.9
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has increased by 11% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR)

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP)

Measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

Measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.683

8% from 2019

SJR for Journal of Small Business Management from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.683
2019 1.561
2018 1.84
2017 1.337
2016 1.736
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

1.943

23% from 2019

SNIP for Journal of Small Business Management from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.943
2019 2.536
2018 2.329
2017 1.897
2016 1.961
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has increased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 23% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.
Journal of Small Business Management

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Wiley

Journal of Small Business Management

The primary purpose of the Journal of Small Business Management (JSBM) is to publish scholarly research articles in the fields of small business management and entrepreneurship. As the official journal of the International Council for Small Business (ICSB), the JSBM is recogni...... Read More

Business, Management and Accounting

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Last updated on
09 Jul 2020
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ISSN
0047-2778
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Impact Factor
High - 1.523
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Open Access
Yes
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Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
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Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
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Bibliography Name
apa
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Citation Type
Author Year
(Blonder et al., 1982)
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder, G. E., Tinkham, M., and Klapwijk, T. M. 1982. "Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge im- balance, and supercurrent conversion". Phys. Rev. B, 25(7):4515–4532.

Top papers written in this journal

open accessOpen access Journal Article
The Proactive Personality Scale as a Predictor of Entrepreneurial Intentions

Abstract:

In a review of trends in the entrepreneurship literature, Gartner (1990) identified eight themes characterizing the major issues of entrepreneurship. One of these themes focused on the entrepreneur as an individual, and the notion that entrepreneurship involves individuals with unique personality characteristics and abilities... In a review of trends in the entrepreneurship literature, Gartner (1990) identified eight themes characterizing the major issues of entrepreneurship. One of these themes focused on the entrepreneur as an individual, and the notion that entrepreneurship involves individuals with unique personality characteristics and abilities. Within this domain of research, five attributes have consistently been found to covary with entrepreneurship: need for achievement, locus of control, risk-taking propensity, tolerance for ambiguity, and Type-A behavior (Brockhaus 1982; Brockhaus and Horwitz 1986; Furnham 1992). Despite these findings, a number of scholars have expressed dissatisfaction with extant knowledge of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship. Chell, Haworth, and Brearley (1991) suggested that disagreement on the meaning of "entrepreneurship" has impeded research progress; moreover, these authors advocated using trait terms which describe natural categories accessible to lay persons. Gartner (1988) noted that theoretical models seeking to explain the broad phenomenon of entrepreneurship would benefit by including variables beyond traits alone. Robinson et al. (1991) argued for more dynamic models of the entrepreneurship process. Shaver and Scott (1991) identified the methodological weaknesses of much entrepreneurial trait research (including the research that generated the attributes listed above) and argued for consistency between the specificity of measures and underlying constructs. Perhaps as a result of criticisms such as these, recently little research has been published examining the relationship between personality traits and entrepreneurship. Considerable attention has been devoted to creating ambitious models of various entrepreneurial processes, such as new venture initiation (Herron and Sapienza 1992), entrepreneurial potential (Krueger and Brazeal 1994), and entrepreneurial motivation (Naffziger, Hornsby, and Kuratko 1994). These conceptual frameworks have significantly enhanced the precision of theory surrounding the entrepreneurship process. However, the death knell for the study of personality and entrepreneurship may have sounded prematurely. The proactive personality scale, a recent addition to the literature on individual differences, appears to have the potential for providing further insight into the personality trait-entrepreneurship relationship. The proactive personality scale measures a personal disposition toward proactive behavior, an idea that intuitively appears to be related to entrepreneurship. The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the extent to which having a proactive personality is associated with entrepreneurial intentions. Because a common definition of entrepreneurship is lacking, it is incumbent upon researchers to define explicitly the meaning they ascribe to the term (Gartner 1989; 1990). The central variable in this paper, entrepreneurial intentions, will be defined as one's judgements about the likelihood of owning one's own business. For the research questions in this paper, differences in specific tactics and themes of entrepreneurship (for example, creating a new venture vs. buying an existing business) will not be explored. Defining entrepreneurial intentions broadly is consistent with the objectives of this research in that it avoids delimiting subjects' expression of entrepreneurial intentions. The study of behavioral intentions has a rich history in psychology (for example, Ajzen and Fishbein 1980), and has begun to appear in both conceptual (Bird 1988; Katz and Gartner 1988; Krueger and Brazeal 1994) and empirical (Brenner, Pringle, and Greenhaus 1991; Krueger 1993a; 1993b; Scott and Twomey 1988) entrepreneurship research. Krueger (1993b) argued that entrepreneurial intentions are central to understanding the entrepreneurship process because they form the underpinnings of new organizations. Because entrepreneurship occurs over time (Gartner et al. … read more read less

Topics:

Entrepreneurship (62%)62% related to the paper, Personality (52%)52% related to the paper, Proactivity (51%)51% related to the paper, Big Five personality traits (51%)51% related to the paper
947 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article
Women's Organizational Exodus to Entrepreneurship: Self-Reported Motivations and Correlates with Success

Abstract:

Women-owned businesses are a powerful force in today's American economy Twenty-nine percent of all businesses are owned by women (Census Bureau 1991) Women employ over fifteen million American workers, over one-third more than all the Fortune 500 companies worldwide (National Foundation for Women Business Owners [NFWBO] and D... Women-owned businesses are a powerful force in today's American economy Twenty-nine percent of all businesses are owned by women (Census Bureau 1991) Women employ over fifteen million American workers, over one-third more than all the Fortune 500 companies worldwide (National Foundation for Women Business Owners [NFWBO] and Dunn and Bradstreet Information Services 1995) Operating in all industries, female entrepreneurs have more than tripled in number from 25 million in 1980 to 77 million in 1994, representing a rate of increase which is double that of male-owned businesses (NFWBO 1995) The Committee on Small Business (1988) estimated that by the year 2000 about half of all businesses will be owned by women Nearly 31 percent of these women have had previous executive/management or supervisory experience prior to starting their own businesses (Census Bureau 1991) Few researchers have examined this highly-trained group of women entrepreneurs who leave corporate environments to start businesses of their own This study investigates four important issues: (1) What motivational influences affect former managerial or professional women's entrepreneurial decisions; (2) What role family concerns play in these former corporate women's entrepreneurial motivation; (3) How these female entrepreneurs measure success in their ventures; and (4) Whether the women's entrepreneurial motivation is related to the ways they measure success in their own businesses The findings of this research are important for several reasons Women's career motivation currently receives little research attention Investigation of women's entrepreneurial motivation and success measures will provide needed insight into women's career development Consultants to women considering entrepreneurship would better understand their clients' motivation and would be better able to help the women make informed career decisions The results could also help women who seek greater self-awareness about their motivation and its influence on their personal and professional success This awareness would help them integrate the work and personal dimensions of their lives Past Research on Entrepreneurial Motivation and Success Measures While investigations into the reasons women start businesses have been sparse, over the past twenty years a number of studies have examined the reasons men initiate ventures (Birley and Westhead 1994; Cooper and Dunkelberg 1981; Denison and Alexander 1986; Dubini 1988; Scheinberg and MacMillan 1988; Shane, Kolvereid, and Westhead 1991; Shapero 1975) In general, researchers have found that men start their businesses primarily as a result of such "pull" factors as the opportunity to work independently, to have greater control over one's work, and to earn more money There is a lesser influence from such "push" factors as limited advancement opportunities, job frustration, and avoiding an unreasonable boss or unsafe working conditions With one exception, in none of these studies were women entrepreneurs addressed separately or did they constitute more than ten percent of the sample The exception, Shane, Kolvereid, and Westhead (1991), studied non-US entrepreneurs, including women, and reported that the male entrepreneurs were most motivated by the need to improve their positions in society for themselves and their families, while the female entrepreneurs were most motivated by the need for achievement However, the authors cautioned that cultural differences across samples precluded generalizing findings to US entrepreneurs Research on Women's Entrepreneurial Motivation In one study of women's entrepreneurial motivation, Hisrich and Brush (1985) asked their women business-owner respondents for the reasons they started their businesses Most frequently cited were "push" factors of frustration and boredom in their previous jobs, followed by interest in the business, with "pull" factors such as autonomy a distant third … read more read less

Topics:

Entrepreneurship (55%)55% related to the paper, Small business (53%)53% related to the paper, Career development (51%)51% related to the paper
850 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/J.1540-627X.2004.00102.X
Market Orientation, Innovativeness, Product Innovation, and Performance in Small Firms

Abstract:

Most research on market orientation, innovation and performance is related to big enterprises and small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). In this study a model is developed to investigate the co... Most research on market orientation, innovation and performance is related to big enterprises and small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). In this study a model is developed to investigate the co... read more read less

Topics:

Product innovation (62%)62% related to the paper, Market orientation (62%)62% related to the paper
838 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/1540-627X.00080
A Resource-Based Approach to the Study of Export Performance
Charles Dhanaraj1, Paul W. Beamish2

Abstract:

This paper presents a comparative study of the export performance of U.S. and Canadian small and medium-sized exporters. A parsimonious model is developed drawing on the resource-based theory of the firm, with three sets of resources, namely firm size, enterprise, and technological intensity. These key resources are good pred... This paper presents a comparative study of the export performance of U.S. and Canadian small and medium-sized exporters. A parsimonious model is developed drawing on the resource-based theory of the firm, with three sets of resources, namely firm size, enterprise, and technological intensity. These key resources are good predictors of the export strategy of a firm. Export strategy is modeled as degree of internationalization, and its effect on the overall firm performance is studied using firm-level performance measures. LISREL's multiple group analysis feature is used in the analysis to test the model. The results confirm the validity of the model across the two data sets. read more read less

Topics:

Export performance (65%)65% related to the paper
705 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1111/J.1540-627X.2009.00278.X
The Complementary Effects of Market Orientation and Entrepreneurial Orientation on Profitability in Small Businesses
William E. Baker1, James M. Sinkula2

Abstract:

Market orientation (MO) and entrepreneurial orientation (EO) are correlated, but distinct constructs. MO reflects the degree to which firms' strategic market planning is driven by customer and comp... Market orientation (MO) and entrepreneurial orientation (EO) are correlated, but distinct constructs. MO reflects the degree to which firms' strategic market planning is driven by customer and comp... read more read less

Topics:

Entrepreneurial orientation (73%)73% related to the paper, Market orientation (68%)68% related to the paper
702 Citations
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Frequently asked questions

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Absolutely not! Our tool has been designed to help you focus on writing. You can write your entire paper as per the Journal of Small Business Management guidelines and auto format it.

2. Do you follow the Journal of Small Business Management guidelines?

Yes, the template is compliant with the Journal of Small Business Management guidelines. Our experts at SciSpace ensure that. If there are any changes to the journal's guidelines, we'll change our algorithm accordingly.

3. Can I cite my article in multiple styles in Journal of Small Business Management?

Of course! We support all the top citation styles, such as APA style, MLA style, Vancouver style, Harvard style, and Chicago style. For example, when you write your paper and hit autoformat, our system will automatically update your article as per the Journal of Small Business Management citation style.

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Sign up for our free trial, and you'll be able to use all our features for seven days. You'll see how helpful they are and how inexpensive they are compared to other options, Especially for Journal of Small Business Management.

5. Can I use a manuscript in Journal of Small Business Management that I have written in MS Word?

Yes. You can choose the right template, copy-paste the contents from the word document, and click on auto-format. Once you're done, you'll have a publish-ready paper Journal of Small Business Management that you can download at the end.

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After writing your paper autoformatting in Journal of Small Business Management, you can download it in multiple formats, viz., PDF, Docx, and LaTeX.

12. Is Journal of Small Business Management's impact factor high enough that I should try publishing my article there?

To be honest, the answer is no. The impact factor is one of the many elements that determine the quality of a journal. Few of these factors include review board, rejection rates, frequency of inclusion in indexes, and Eigenfactor. You need to assess all these factors before you make your final call.

13. What is Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy for Journal of Small Business Management?

SHERPA/RoMEO Database

We extracted this data from Sherpa Romeo to help researchers understand the access level of this journal in accordance with the Sherpa Romeo Archiving Policy for Journal of Small Business Management. The table below indicates the level of access a journal has as per Sherpa Romeo's archiving policy.

RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
FYI:
  1. Pre-prints as being the version of the paper before peer review and
  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

14. What are the most common citation types In Journal of Small Business Management?

The 5 most common citation types in order of usage for Journal of Small Business Management are:.

S. No. Citation Style Type
1. Author Year
2. Numbered
3. Numbered (Superscripted)
4. Author Year (Cited Pages)
5. Footnote

15. How do I submit my article to the Journal of Small Business Management?

It is possible to find the Word template for any journal on Google. However, why use a template when you can write your entire manuscript on SciSpace , auto format it as per Journal of Small Business Management's guidelines and download the same in Word, PDF and LaTeX formats? Give us a try!.

16. Can I download Journal of Small Business Management in Endnote format?

Yes, SciSpace provides this functionality. After signing up, you would need to import your existing references from Word or Bib file to SciSpace. Then SciSpace would allow you to download your references in Journal of Small Business Management Endnote style according to Elsevier guidelines.

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