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Journal ArticleDOI

e-Learning Research: Emerging Issues?.

01 Mar 2005-Research in Learning Technology (Routledge)-Vol. 13, Iss: 1, pp 81-89
TL;DR: In this paper, a discussion piece suggests that the focus should fall on questions that are both clear and tractable for researchers, and likely to have a real impact on learners and practitioners, based on early findings from a series of JISC-funded projects on e-learning and pedagogy.
Abstract: e-Learning research is an expanding and diversifying field of study. Specialist research units and departments proliferate. Postgraduate courses recruit well in the UK and overseas, with an increasing focus on critical and research-based aspects of the field, as well as the more obvious professional development requirements. Following this year’s launch of a National e-Learning Research Centre, it is timely to debate what the field of study should be prioritising for the future. This discussion piece suggests that the focus should fall on questions that are both clear and tractable for researchers, and likely to have a real impact on learners and practitioners. Suggested questions are based on early findings from a series of JISC-funded projects on e-learning and pedagogy. DOI: 10.1080/0968776042000339817

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Citations
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01 Jan 2006

412 citations


Cites background from "e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..."

  • ...There have been reviews of e-learning in disciplines such as language learning (Chapelle, 2004; Felix, 2005) and technologies including e-portfolios (Beetham, 2005a), computer aided assessment (Conole and Warburton, 2005) and interactive whiteboards (Smith, Higgins et al., 2005) which make…...

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors look at the implications of Web 2.0 technologies for university teaching and learning, and draw upon a fictional character in order to capture the possible futures of such a brave new world.
Abstract: This paper looks at the implications of Web 2.0 technologies for university teaching and learning. The latest generation of undergraduates already live in a Web 2.0 world. They have new service expectations and are increasingly dissatisfied with teacher-centred pedagogies. To attract and retain these students, universities will need to rethink their operations. New social technologies mean that universities have the chance to create a new generation of student-centred learning environments, to realize the idea of a University 2.0. The following discussion draws upon a fictional character in order to capture the possible futures of such a brave new world. DOI: 10.1080/09687760701673568

111 citations


Cites background from "e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..."

  • ...Few would dispute that the past decade has seen unprecedented innovation in the area of Web-based learning and teaching in higher education (Dede, 2000; Garrison & Anderson, 2003; Evans et al., 2004; Beetham, 2005; New Media Consortium & EDUCAUSE, 2006)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The five-stage model of e-moderating is reviewed and a new conceptual model, ‘the e-learning ladder’, conceived as part of research with healthcare students in the higher education setting is contrasted.
Abstract: The five-stage approach to e-moderating has provided a coherent model upon which to base online learning design in higher education. However, despite its growing popularity, there are concerns that the model is becoming a dominant discourse, being adapted as a template for the design of all online teaching and learning, to the exclusion of other ideas. It is suggested that the five-stage model may not be the panacea it appears and alternative models of e-learning cannot be ignored. This paper reviews the five-stage model and contrasts it with a new conceptual model, ‘the e-learning ladder’, conceived as part of research with healthcare students in the higher education setting. DOI: 10.1080/09687760601129588

108 citations


Cites background from "e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..."

  • ...1 This includes an e-learning and pedagogy strand with a focus on both designing for and understanding learning, including consideration of learner participation in, and experience of, e-learning (Beetham, 2005)....

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  • ...…the UK Joint Information Systems Committee is funding an e-Learning Programme.1 This includes an e-learning and pedagogy strand with a focus on both designing for and understanding learning, including consideration of learner participation in, and experience of, e-learning (Beetham, 2005)....

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Book
01 Aug 2008
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present international practices in the development and use of applied e-learning and e-Teaching in the classroom in order to enhance student experience, add value to teaching practices, and illuminate best practices for e-Assessment.
Abstract: Over the past decade, computer-enhanced learning has increased in demand due to developments in technological aids such as multimedia presentation and the internet. In this age of technology, it is imperative for teachers to consider the importance of technological integration in the classroom. Applied E-Learning and E-Teaching in Higher Education presents international practices in the development and use of applied e-Learning and e-Teaching in the classroom in order to enhance student experience, add value to teaching practices, and illuminate best practices in the area of e-Assessment. This innovative title provides fresh insight into e-Learning and e-Teaching practices while exploring the varying roles of academic staff in adoption and application.

78 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors argue that educational technologists make significant contributions to the development, organisational embedding and service provision of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environments, which are key enablers for mass access to flexible higher education (HE).
Abstract: Purpose – Educational technologists make significant contributions to the development, organisational embedding and service provision of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) environments, which are key enablers for mass access to flexible higher education (HE). Given the increasing centrality of this role, it is advocated that institutions investigate sustainable career structures for educational technologists. This paper aims to address these issues.Design/methodology/approach – The arguments are evidence‐driven by the small body of research literature describing the role of educational technologists and contextualized by the experiences as academics and leaders of TEL projects in HE, including managing educational technologists.Findings – The roles of educational technologists are very diverse, requiring competencies in educational leadership, both management and technical. Their career paths, backgrounds, legitimate powers and organisational locations exhibit considerable variation.Research limitations/i...

40 citations

References
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Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: Learning style instruments are widely used but not enough is known about their reliability and validity and their impact on pedagogy in post-16 learning as discussed by the authors, which is why it is important to evaluate the main models of learning styles.
Abstract: Learning style instruments are widely used but not enough is known about their reliability and validity and their impact on pedagogy in post-16 learning. This report documents work from a project commissioned by the Learning and Skills Development Agency (LSDA) to carry out an extensive review of research on post-16 learning styles, to evaluate the main models of learning styles, and to discuss the implications of learning styles for post-16 teaching and learning. The following research questions were addressed: What models of learning styles are influential and potentially influential? What empirical evidence is there to support the claims made for these models? What are the broad implications for pedagogy of these models? What empirical evidence is there that models of learning styles have an impact on students’ learning? The project identified the range of models that are available and influential or potentially influential in research and practice, located these models within identifiable ‘families’ of ideas about learning styles, evaluated the theories, claims and applications of these models, with a particular focus on evaluating the authors’ claims for reliability and validity, evaluated the claims made for the pedagogical implications of the selected models of learning styles, identified what gaps there are in current knowledge and what future research is needed in this area, and made recommendations and drew conclusions about the research field as a whole. This report provides a systematic and critical review of 13 learning style models. It discusses the appeal of learning styles as well as offering an overview of ways in which political and institutional contexts in the learning and skills sector affect the ways that learning styles might be put into practice. In conclusion, the implications for pedagogy are drawn out and recommendations and conclusions are offered for practitioners, policymakers and the research community. The report concludes that it matters fundamentally which model is chosen. A complementary report (indexed at TD/TNC 79.71) provides detailed reviews of the 13 major models of learning styles based on these research questions and objectives.

500 citations

19 Nov 2004
TL;DR: The work is managed by Professor Oleg Liber and the lhe lead researcher and author of the report, Sandy Britain is contracted by Bolton Institute of Higher Education as mentioned in this paper, which is a research group at the University of Sheffield.
Abstract: This proposal is from Bolton Institute of Higher Education. The work is managed by Professor Oleg Liber and the lhe lead researcher and author of the report, Sandy Britain is contracted by Bolton Institute.

123 citations


"e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...(c) Research questions have been paraphrased and grouped into topics in ways that the original contributors may not have intended....

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  • ...The research methodology used for this study, based at the University of Oxford, will also be applied to other tools used in the ‘designing for learning’ process (for details of other tools under review see Britain, 2004)....

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01 Apr 2004
TL;DR: It is suggested that design patterns offer a useful method for sharing design ideas in participatory educational design work, making use of an organisational and communicative framework derived from Christopher Alexander's work on pattern languages.
Abstract: The work of designing a useful, convivial networked learning environment is complex and demanding. People new to designing for networked learning face a number of major challenges when they try to draw on the experience of others – whether that experience is shared informally, in the everyday language of educational practice, or through published research and evaluation studies, or through sets of action-oriented guidelines. In this paper we present a novel approach to sharing educational design experience, making use of an organisational and communicative framework derived from Christopher Alexander’s work on pattern languages. We describe the structure and purpose of design patterns, show how they fit together in a pattern language, and illustrate the approach with reference to some design patterns for networked learning. For clarity, our presentation is set within a specific conception of the nature of designing for networked learning, but we aim to show how the patterns-based approach transcends such particularities. We suggest that design patterns offer a useful method for sharing design ideas in participatory educational design work.

88 citations


"e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..." refers background in this paper

  • ...For example: ● What contribution could be made by the semantic web and ontologies community (wwww.w3.org/2001/sw/Activity), or by the development of learning-related patterns (Goodyear et al., 2004; McAndrew, 2004)?...

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  • ...● Which of these questions require further original research?...

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Book ChapterDOI
19 Apr 2007
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider alternative ways in which learning activities can be portrayed in order to be shared, and propose a learning design approach, where the aim is to build a formal description that can be handled by a computer and played to an end user.
Abstract: This chapter considers alternative ways in which learning activities can be represented in order to be shared. In particular it looks at a ‘learning design’ approach, where the aim is to build a formal description that can be handled by a computer and played to an end user. The strengths of this approach are considered in relation to the tools that are being developed to support the IMS Learning Design specification, and the portability of the resulting designs. The chapter goes on to consider an alternative approach that may have lower barriers to take-up by practitioners. ‘Patterns’ provide flexible descriptions that engage and challenge their users, and can be mapped to different contexts of use. A pilot patterns-based approach is described, whereby existing materials are reworked as online open content with patterns extracted and stored to assist the process of design in the future.

28 citations


"e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..." refers background in this paper

  • ...For example: ● What contribution could be made by the semantic web and ontologies community (wwww.w3.org/2001/sw/Activity), or by the development of learning-related patterns (Goodyear et al., 2004; McAndrew, 2004)?...

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  • ...Helen Beetham*...

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  • ...● Are these questions tractable, given the current state of understanding and the resources available?...

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01 Apr 2004
TL;DR: The future research direction for e-learning in relation to the needs of higher education is considered and a division can be made into research needs for work on measures of effectiveness, representation of effective learning designs, and methods to support knowledge sharing.
Abstract: In this paper we consider the future research direction for e-learning in relation to the needs of higher education. E-learning is recognised as a relevant method for the provision of learning across all areas of society and is considered of strategic importance at government level (HEFCE, 2003; DfES, 2003). In setting such strategies there should be sound knowledge of what approaches are effective and significant for the take up of e-learning. However, this would ignore the indications that there are weaknesses in the fundamental research that can inform such knowledge. Methods from other forms of research, such as comparative studies, often overlook the complexity of the learning process and the inevitable lack of impact from changes to methods of delivery. A critical review of the problems in supporting e-learning based on collation of expert views was carried out within a project, funded by the EU (eLearnTN, 2003). The results from that work led to proposed key research areas and research questions that need to be addressed as e-learning is introduced into existing or novel contexts. In particular a division can be made into research needs for work on measures of effectiveness, representation of effective learning designs, and methods to support knowledge sharing.

6 citations


"e-Learning Research: Emerging Issue..." refers background in this paper

  • ...In the United Kingdom, the main research funding councils have commissioned a consultation process to identify key issues for future support, under the direction of the Institute for Educational Technology (McAndrew et al., 2004)....

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