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Journal ArticleDOI

Life cycle of Oligonychus coffeae (Acari: Tetranychidae) on tea leaves in Darjeeling, West Bengal, India

01 Jan 2014-Animal Biology (Brill)-Vol. 64, Iss: 4, pp 395-400
TL;DR: The life cycle of the tea red spider mite, Oligonychus coffeae, Nienter was studied on tea leaves in Darjeeling under laboratory conditions at 20°C and 65% relative humidity and will hopefully help to devise a management strategy for this pest species.

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Abstract: The tea plant, Camellia sinensis (L.), has been cultivated since ancient time and is host to several pest species that can significant reduce productivity. One such pest species is the tea red spider mite. The life cycle of this species, Oligonychus coffeae, Nienter was studied on tea leaves in Darjeeling under laboratory conditions at 20°C and 65% relative humidity. Observations were recorded on freshly laid eggs on tea leaves and continued until individuals reached adulthood. The eggs required an average of 16.17 days to develop into adults. The average longevity of adult was 28.67 days. Our findings contribute to the understanding of mite abundance and population fluctuations in different seasons and climates, and will hopefully help to devise a management strategy for this pest species.

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Topics: Camellia sinensis (60%), Spider mite (55%), Population (52%) ...read more
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
Sagata Mondal1, Salil Kumar Gupta1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: It appears that C. buchanani is better host among the two hosts as because the life cycle was completed in shorter time, recording high fecundity and longer longevity.

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Abstract: The present paper reports duration of different developmental stages as well as fecundity, longevity, oviposition periods, sex ratio, etc. of Tetranychus sayedi Baker & Pitchard on two medicinal plants, viz. Cryptolepis buchanani Roem & Schult and Justicia adhatoda L. under laboratory condition at 27.5 °C and 65% R.H. during February-March, 2016. The two hosts in which the life cycle was studied form two new records of hosts for this mite. It appears that C. buchanani is better host among the two hosts as because the life cycle (egg to adult) was completed in shorter time, recording high fecundity and longer longevity.

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2 citations


Cites background or methods or result from "Life cycle of Oligonychus coffeae (..."

  • ...…(Puttaswamy and Channabasavanna 1980; Mallikarajunappa and Nageshchandra 1989; Manjunatha and Puttuswamy 1989; Sirsikar and Nagabhushanam 1989; Nayak et al. 2007; Rai et al.1989; Tello et al. 2009; Haque et al. 2007; Kaimal and Ramani 2011; Biswas et al. 2013; Podder et al. 2014, respectively)....

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  • ...…in the present study was much shorter as compared to duration reported by Maity and Chakrabarti (1978), Mallikarajunappa and Nageshchandra (1989), Podder et al. (2014) and much higher as compared to duration reported by Sirsikar and Nagabhushanam (1989), Kaimal and Ramani (2011), but close to…...

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  • ...…days in T. chinnabarinus (Tello et al. 2009); 0.79 ± 0.07 days in T. chinnabarinus (Kaimal and Ramani 2011); 1.00 ± 0.17 days in T. macfarlanei on C. ternatea and 3.6 ± 0.34 days in the same mite on J. adhatoda (Biswas et al. 2013); 6.4 ± 0.21 days in O. coffeae on tea leaves (Podder et al. 2014)....

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  • ...The daily fecundity of the fertilized female of O. coffeae, was 6.12 ± 1.14 as recorded by Podder et al. (2014)....

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  • ...…fertilized female on lablab beans (Kaimal and Ramani 2011); 1.0 ± 0.00 days in case of fertilized female and C. ternatea and 1.0 ± 0.00 days in case of fertilized female J. adhatoda in T. macfarlanei by (Biswas et al. 2013); 3.00 ± 0.60 days in fertilized female of O. coffeae (Podder et al. 2014)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Piu Banerjee1, Moinul Islam1, Arghya Laha1, Himani Biswas2  +5 moreInstitutions (5)
TL;DR: The increase in phenolic and alcoholic components and decrease in Chl contents may affect the quality of Darjeeling tea and the extent of damages done by the pests measured here could aid the pest management in tea gardens.

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Abstract: Introduction Darjeeling tea of India is one of the most famous beverages globally. However, a large amount of tea crop is damaged every year by the attack of mites. Objectives The study aimed to determine the changes in different pigments and biochemical components of tea leaves due to mite infestation. Materials and methods We used UV-visible and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy simultaneously to understand the damages in pigment contents of the leaves of tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze) due to attack of phytophagus mite, Oligonychus coffeae Nietner. Furthermore, chemical analysis of infested tea leaves was also performed to compare the nutrients of the plants, namely total phenol, protein and soluble sugar. Results The UV-visible study reveals severe reduction of the pigments such as chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoids and xanthophylls in the tea leaf due to mite infestation. The findings of the FTIR study, also shows variation in different physiochemical components in the leaf Chl. The sugar and protein content of the infested leaves have been reduced compared to uninfested ones. Results in the case of tea leaves plucked during first (March) and third (November) flushes show similar trends. Conclusion The increase in phenolic and alcoholic components and decrease in Chl contents may affect the quality of Darjeeling tea. The extent of damages done by the pests measured here could aid the pest management in tea gardens.

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2 citations


References
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Book
01 Jan 1954-
TL;DR: An introduction to the study of insects is presented, with some examples from the natural sciences, of birds, bees, and other insects that have been studied in detail.

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Abstract: An introduction to the study of insects , An introduction to the study of insects , مرکز فناوری اطلاعات و اطلاع رسانی کشاورزی

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2,084 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

66 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The red spider, Oligonychus coffeae (Nietn.), is the most widely distributed and probably also the most serious pest of tea in north-eastern India, and also occurs on tea in other parts of India and in other countries.

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Abstract: The red spider, Oligonychus coffeae (Nietn.), is the most widely distributed and probably also the most serious pest of tea in north-eastern India, and also occurs on tea in other parts of India and in other countries. It attacks jute, Corchorus capsularis, in India and has been recorded on a wide variety of other plants in India and other countries.The life-history of O. coffeae in north-eastern India is described. The duration of the life-cycle varies with the season depending on the temperature and humidity.In May and June the life-cycle is completed in 9·4–12 days outdoors, while in the cold weather it may take as much as 28 days. The maximum length of life of a female has been found to be 29 days indoors. The males usually die within four or five days. Parthenogenetic reproduction may take place under induced conditions, the progeny being all males.Red spider normally attacks the upper surface of the mature leaves in which the sap is not flowing freely. In a severe infestation, particularly under conditions of dry weather, the lower surface and the young leaves are almost equally attacked. The affected leaves turn brown, then bronze, and may eventually dry up and fall off.The red spider mites live under a cover of web that they spin as a protection against inclement weather. The pest occurs in severe form from March to June but with the monsoon rains it practically disappears. A second, light, attack may, however, develop in September or October.During the cold weather, the mites are present in very small numbers on a few old leaves of the tea bushes, and with the rise in temperature in the spring, they multiply rapidly, resulting in subsequent heavy infestations.Various factors influence the incidence of red spider and the intensity of its attack. Pruned bushes properly cleaned out are less affected. Bushes defoliated after pruning, and medium pruned tea remain practically unaffectsd. Prolonged dry weather during the early part of the flushing season normally increases the red spider incidence. It prefers bright sun and unshaded areas are more severely attacked.The red spider spreads from bush to bush by crawling. Dispersal is also effected by various agencies such as wind, cattle, goats and labourers.A number of predatory insects attack eggs and other stages of the red spider, often keeping it considerably in check.

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61 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In pruning, a great many of the old leaves (including janams) are removed from bushes, and, concomitantly, the red spider is less attacked than unpruned tea or ‘ skiffed ’ tea in which comparatively more leaves are left on bushes.

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Abstract: The red spider, Oligonychus coffeae (Niet.), persists in all stages of its development on a few old leaves and ‘ janams ’ (small leaves at the base of the shoot) of tea bushes during the cold weather, and this persisting population is primarily responsible for the attack in the spring.In pruning, a great many of the old leaves (including janams) are removed from bushes, and, concomitantly, the red spider. Pruned tea is, therefore, less attacked than unpruned tea or ‘ skiffed ’ tea (where just a little is cut off the tops of the shoots) in which comparatively more leaves are left on bushes.

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26 citations