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Patent

Systems and Methods for Secure Transaction Management and Electronic Rights Protection

30 Sep 2010-

Abstract: PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To solve the problem, wherein it is impossible for an electronic content information provider to provide commercially secure and effective method, for a configurable general-purpose electronic commercial transaction/distribution control system. SOLUTION: In this system, having at least one protected processing environment for safely controlling at least one portion of decoding of digital information, a secure content distribution method comprises a process for encapsulating digital information in one or more digital containers; a process for encrypting at least a portion of digital information; a process for associating at least partially secure control information for managing interactions with encrypted digital information and/or digital container; a process for delivering one or more digital containers to a digital information user; and a process for using a protected processing environment, for safely controlling at least a portion of the decoding of the digital information. COPYRIGHT: (C)2006,JPO&NCIPI
Topics: Information assurance (54%), Information security (51%), Encryption (51%)
Citations
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Book ChapterDOI
15 Aug 1999-
Abstract: Cryptosystem designers frequently assume that secrets will be manipulated in closed, reliable computing environments. Unfortunately, actual computers and microchips leak information about the operations they process. This paper examines specific methods for analyzing power consumption measurements to find secret keys from tamper resistant devices. We also discuss approaches for building cryptosystems that can operate securely in existing hardware that leaks information.

6,498 citations


Patent
29 Aug 2006-
Abstract: An intelligent electronic appliance preferably includes a user interface, data input and/or output port, and an intelligent processor. A preferred embodiment comprises a set top box for interacting with broadband media streams, with an adaptive user interface, content-based media processing and/or media metadata processing, and telecommunications integration. An adaptive user interface models the user, by observation, feedback, and/or explicit input, and presents a user interface and/or executes functions based on the user model. A content-based media processing system analyzes media content, for example audio and video, to understand the content, for example to generate content-descriptive metadata. A media metadata processing system operates on locally or remotely generated metadata to process the media in accordance with the metadata, which may be, for example, an electronic program guide, MPEG 7 data, and/or automatically generated format. A set top box preferably includes digital trick play effects, and incorporated digital rights management features.

2,644 citations


Patent
20 Aug 2007-
Abstract: A system for utilizing metadata created either at a central location for shared use by connected users, or at each individual user's location, to enhance user's enjoyment of available broadcast programming content. A variety of mechanisms are employed for automatically and manually identifying and designating programming segments, associating descriptive metadata which the identified segments, distributing the metadata for use at client locations, and using the supplied metadata to selectively record and playback desired programming.

2,229 citations


Patent
06 Jun 1995-
Abstract: An adaptive interface for a programmable system, for predicting a desired user function, based on user history, as well as machine internal status and context. The apparatus receives an input from the user and other data. A predicted input is presented for confirmation by the user, and the predictive mechanism is updated based on this feedback. Also provided is a pattern recognition system for a multimedia device, wherein a user input is matched to a video stream on a conceptual basis, allowing inexact programming of a multimedia device. The system analyzes a data stream for correspondence with a data pattern for processing and storage. The data stream is subjected to adaptive pattern recognition to extract features of interest to provide a highly compressed representation which may be efficiently processed to determine correspondence. Applications of the interface and system include a VCR, medical device, vehicle control system, audio device, environmental control system, securities trading terminal, and smart house. The system optionally includes an actuator for effecting the environment of operation, allowing closed-loop feedback operation and automated learning.

1,976 citations


Patent
13 Aug 1998-
Abstract: Disclosed is a method and apparatus of securely providing data to a user's system. The data is encrypted so as to only be decryptable by a data decrypting key, the data decrypting key being encrypted using a first public key, and the encrypted data being accessible to the user's system, the method comprising the steps of: transferring the encrypted data decrypting key to a clearing house that possesses a first private key, which corresponds to the first public key; decrypting the data decrypting key using the first private key; re-encrypting the data decrypting key using a second public key; transferring the re-encrypted data decrypting key to the user's system, the user's system possessing a second private key, which corresponds to the second public key; and decrypting the re-encrypted data decrypting key using the second private key.

1,610 citations


References
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An encryption method is presented with the novel property that publicly revealing an encryption key does not thereby reveal the corresponding decryption key.
Abstract: An encryption method is presented with the novel property that publicly revealing an encryption key does not thereby reveal the corresponding decryption key. This has two important consequences: (1) Couriers or other secure means are not needed to transmit keys, since a message can be enciphered using an encryption key publicly revealed by the intented recipient. Only he can decipher the message, since only he knows the corresponding decryption key. (2) A message can be “signed” using a privately held decryption key. Anyone can verify this signature using the corresponding publicly revealed encryption key. Signatures cannot be forged, and a signer cannot later deny the validity of his signature. This has obvious applications in “electronic mail” and “electronic funds transfer” systems. A message is encrypted by representing it as a number M, raising M to a publicly specified power e, and then taking the remainder when the result is divided by the publicly specified product, n, of two large secret primer numbers p and q. Decryption is similar; only a different, secret, power d is used, where e * d ≡ 1(mod (p - 1) * (q - 1)). The security of the system rests in part on the difficulty of factoring the published divisor, n.

14,611 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Whitfield Diffie1, Martin E. Hellman1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: This paper suggests ways to solve currently open problems in cryptography, and discusses how the theories of communication and computation are beginning to provide the tools to solve cryptographic problems of long standing.
Abstract: Two kinds of contemporary developments in cryptography are examined. Widening applications of teleprocessing have given rise to a need for new types of cryptographic systems, which minimize the need for secure key distribution channels and supply the equivalent of a written signature. This paper suggests ways to solve these currently open problems. It also discusses how the theories of communication and computation are beginning to provide the tools to solve cryptographic problems of long standing.

14,068 citations


Book
01 Jan 1975-
TL;DR: Readers of this book will gain a strong working knowledge of the overall structure, concepts, and objectives of database systems and will become familiar with the theoretical principles underlying the construction of such systems.
Abstract: From the Publisher: For over 25 years, C. J. Date's An Introduction to Database Systems has been the authoritative resource for readers interested in gaining insight into and understanding of the principles of database systems. This revision continues to provide a solid grounding in the foundations of database technology and to provide some ideas as to how the field is likely to develop in the future.. "Readers of this book will gain a strong working knowledge of the overall structure, concepts, and objectives of database systems and will become familiar with the theoretical principles underlying the construction of such systems.

3,862 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Paul Resnick1, Hal R. Varian2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: This special section includes descriptions of five recommender systems, which provide recommendations as inputs, which the system then aggregates and directs to appropriate recipients, and which combine evaluations with content analysis.
Abstract: Recommender systems assist and augment this natural social process. In a typical recommender system people provide recommendations as inputs, which the system then aggregates and directs to appropriate recipients. In some cases the primary transformation is in the aggregation; in others the system’s value lies in its ability to make good matches between the recommenders and those seeking recommendations. The developers of the first recommender system, Tapestry [1], coined the phrase “collaborative filtering” and several others have adopted it. We prefer the more general term “recommender system” for two reasons. First, recommenders may not explictly collaborate with recipients, who may be unknown to each other. Second, recommendations may suggest particularly interesting items, in addition to indicating those that should be filtered out. This special section includes descriptions of five recommender systems. A sixth article analyzes incentives for provision of recommendations. Figure 1 places the systems in a technical design space defined by five dimensions. First, the contents of an evaluation can be anything from a single bit (recommended or not) to unstructured textual annotations. Second, recommendations may be entered explicitly, but several systems gather implicit evaluations: GroupLens monitors users’ reading times; PHOAKS mines Usenet articles for mentions of URLs; and Siteseer mines personal bookmark lists. Third, recommendations may be anonymous, tagged with the source’s identity, or tagged with a pseudonym. The fourth dimension, and one of the richest areas for exploration, is how to aggregate evaluations. GroupLens, PHOAKS, and Siteseer employ variants on weighted voting. Fab takes that one step further to combine evaluations with content analysis. ReferralWeb combines suggested links between people to form longer referral chains. Finally, the (perhaps aggregated) evaluations may be used in several ways: negative recommendations may be filtered out, the items may be sorted according to numeric evaluations, or evaluations may accompany items in a display. Figures 2 and 3 identify dimensions of the domain space: The kinds of items being recommended and the people among whom evaluations are shared. Consider, first, the domain of items. The sheer volume is an important variable: Detailed textual reviews of restaurants or movies may be practical, but applying the same approach to thousands of daily Netnews messages would not. Ephemeral media such as netnews (most news servers throw away articles after one or two weeks) place a premium on gathering and distributing evaluations quickly, while evaluations for 19th century books can be gathered at a more leisurely pace. The last dimension describes the cost structure of choices people make about the items. Is it very costly to miss IT IS OFTEN NECESSARY TO MAKE CHOICES WITHOUT SUFFICIENT personal experience of the alternatives. In everyday life, we rely on

3,817 citations


Book
19 Aug 1998-
TL;DR: The new edition of William Stallings' Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice, 5e is a practical survey of cryptography and network security with unmatched support for instructors and students.
Abstract: William Stallings' Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice, 5e is a practical survey of cryptography and network security with unmatched support for instructors and students. In this age of universal electronic connectivity, viruses and hackers, electronic eavesdropping, and electronic fraud, security is paramount. This text provides a practical survey of both the principles and practice of cryptography and network security. First, the basic issues to be addressed by a network security capability are explored through a tutorial and survey of cryptography and network security technology. Then, the practice of network security is explored via practical applications that have been implemented and are in use today. An unparalleled support package for instructors and students ensures a successful teaching and learning experience. The new edition has been updated to include coverage of the latest topics including expanded coverage of block cipher modes of operation, including authenticated encryption; revised and expanded coverage of AES; expanded coverage of pseudorandom number generation; new coverage of federated identity, HTTPS, Secure Shell (SSH) and wireless network security; completely rewritten and updated coverage of IPsec; and a new chapter on legal and ethical issues.

3,643 citations


Network Information
Performance
Metrics
No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
202113
202073
201992
201894
2017132
2016184