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Institution

University of Leeds

EducationLeeds, United Kingdom
About: University of Leeds is a(n) education organization based out in Leeds, United Kingdom. It is known for research contribution in the topic(s): Population & Poison control. The organization has 43481 authors who have published 101856 publication(s) receiving 3672065 citation(s). The organization is also known as: Leeds University.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: ERA-Interim is the latest global atmospheric reanalysis produced by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The ERA-Interim project was conducted in part to prepare for a new atmospheric reanalysis to replace ERA-40, which will extend back to the early part of the twentieth century. This article describes the forecast model, data assimilation method, and input datasets used to produce ERA-Interim, and discusses the performance of the system. Special emphasis is placed on various difficulties encountered in the production of ERA-40, including the representation of the hydrological cycle, the quality of the stratospheric circulation, and the consistency in time of the reanalysed fields. We provide evidence for substantial improvements in each of these aspects. We also identify areas where further work is needed and describe opportunities and objectives for future reanalysis projects at ECMWF. Copyright © 2011 Royal Meteorological Society

19,659 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The state-of-the-art in evaluated methods for both classification and detection are reviewed, whether the methods are statistically different, what they are learning from the images, and what the methods find easy or confuse.
Abstract: The Pascal Visual Object Classes (VOC) challenge is a benchmark in visual object category recognition and detection, providing the vision and machine learning communities with a standard dataset of images and annotation, and standard evaluation procedures. Organised annually from 2005 to present, the challenge and its associated dataset has become accepted as the benchmark for object detection. This paper describes the dataset and evaluation procedure. We review the state-of-the-art in evaluated methods for both classification and detection, analyse whether the methods are statistically different, what they are learning from the images (e.g. the object or its context), and what the methods find easy or confuse. The paper concludes with lessons learnt in the three year history of the challenge, and proposes directions for future improvement and extension.

11,545 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A quantitative integration and review of research on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the subjective norm, which found that intentions and self-predictions were better predictors of behaviour than attitude, subjective norm and PBC.
Abstract: The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) has received considerable attention in the literature. The present study is a quantitative integration and review of that research. From a database of 185 independent studies published up to the end of 1997, the TPB accounted for 27% and 39% of the variance in behaviour and intention, respectively. The perceived behavioural control (PBC) construct accounted for significant amounts of variance in intention and behaviour, independent of theory of reasoned action variables. When behaviour measures were self-reports, the TPB accounted for 11% more of the variance in behaviour than when behaviour measures were objective or observed (R2s = .31 and .21, respectively). Attitude, subjective norm and PBC account for significantly more of the variance in individuals' desires than intentions or self-predictions, but intentions and self-predictions were better predictors of behaviour. The subjective norm construct is generally found to be a weak predictor of intentions. This is partly attributable to a combination of poor measurement and the need for expansion of the normative component. The discussion focuses on ways in which current TPB research can be taken forward in the light of the present review.

8,044 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Max Hamilton1

7,639 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This is an account of further work on a rating scale for depressive states, including a detailed discussion on the general problems of comparing successive samples from a ‘population’, the meaning of factor scores, and the other results obtained.
Abstract: This is an account of further work on a rating scale for depressive states, including a detailed discussion on the general problems of comparing successive samples from a ‘population’, the meaning of factor scores, and the other results obtained. The intercorrelation matrix of the items of the scale has been factor-analysed by the method of principal components, which were then given a Varimax rotation. Weights are given for calculating factor scores, both for rotated as well as unrotated factors. The data for 152 men and 120 women having been kept separate, it is possible to compare the two sets of results. The method of using the rating scale is described in detail in relation to the individual items.

7,597 citations


Authors

Showing all 43481 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Walter C. Willett3342399413322
David J. Hunter2131836207050
Edward Giovannucci2061671179875
Richard Peto183683231434
Paul G. Richardson1831533155912
Chris Sander178713233287
Kenneth C. Anderson1781138126072
David R. Williams1782034138789
Andrew Zisserman167808261717
Michael John Owen1601110135795
Jens J. Holst1601536107858
Paul Emery1581314121293
David Cameron1541586126067
J. Fraser Stoddart147123996083
Debbie A Lawlor1471114101123
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
2022105
20215,909
20205,440
20195,049
20184,747
20174,606