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Journal ArticleDOI

Etiology of oroya fever : ix. bacterium peruvianum, n. sp., a secondary invader of the lesions of verruga peruana.

31 Dec 1927-Journal of Experimental Medicine (The Rockefeller University Press)-Vol. 47, Iss: 1, pp 165-170

TL;DR: A minute, pleomorphic, motile, Gram-negative bacterium has been isolated from two specimens of nodular tissue from human verruga, and because of its presence in material obtained from Peru it has been given the name B. peruvianum.

AbstractA minute, pleomorphic, motile, Gram-negative bacterium has been isolated from two specimens of nodular tissue from human verruga. In films and sections of the original tissues the organism in question is difficult to distinguish from Bartonella bacilliformis, with which it was associated, and even in pure culture it has a number of properties in common with that parasite. No sugars are fermented by it, it is an obligate aerobe, the optimum temperature for its growth is 25°C., and it has two to four spiral flagella attached to one end of the body. It is, however, readily cultivated on any ordinary culture medium. Broth cultures contain much mucin, but no hydrogen sulfide is formed. Coagulated serum is liquefied by its growth, and the red corpuscles in a blood agar plate are hemolyzed. Rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice develop acute, fatal septicemia as a result of intravenous or intratesticular inoculation of young cultures. The liver is characteristically affected and shows a general parenchymatous degeneration and necrosis; the entire gastrointestinal tract is intensely congested, and numerous hemorrhagic areas are present; the spleen, dark and soft, is rarely much enlarged; the kidneys are swollen and congested; the adrenals are much swollen and intensely red; the lungs are sometimes congested but otherwise normal. In the case of intratesticular inoculation the scrotum and testicle both undergo rapid gangrene. In monkeys no septicemia has been observed, but a violent local reaction—swelling, congestion, sometimes necrosis—follows intradermal inoculation. Since no microorganism corresponding in character with this one has previously been described, it is regarded as a new species, and because of its presence in material obtained from Peru it has been given the name Bacterium peruvianum. The significance of the association of B. peruvianum with Bartonella bacilliformis deserves further investigation; it is not impossible that the two organisms are introduced into the human body by the same blood-sucking insect.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Archeologic findings indicate that Carrion's disease was known in Peru in the pre-Incaic era, and Surprisingly accurate representations of the cutaneous nodules, or verrugas, are found in the Peruvian ceramic pots called huacos, especially in the Chimu civilization.
Abstract: CARRION'S disease is caused by Bartonella bacilliformis, a polymorphous organism classified as a bacterium in 1927 by Noguchi, 1 transmitted by sandflies of the genus Phlebotomus. The disease is limited geographically to certain areas of the Andean regions in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador. The disease is extremely polymorphic in symptoms. The confusion existing in the literature arose in part from reports prior to the discovery of B. bacilliformis, when intercurrent infections were not recognized and many symptoms were erroneously assigned to Carrion's disease. The present report is based on a study made on several hundred cases in Lima, Peru, during the period 1938 to 1943. HISTORY AND NOMENCLATURE Archeologic findings indicate that the disease was known in Peru in the pre-Incaic era. Surprisingly accurate representations of the cutaneous nodules, or verrugas, are found in the Peruvian ceramic pots called huacos , especially in the Chimu civilization. 2 The first medical publication

48 citations


Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1932
Abstract: Unter Bartonellen versteht man eine Gruppe von Mikroorganismen, deren Parasitennatur erst in den letzten Jahren sichergestellt werden konnte, deren Einordnung in ein System der Mikroorganismen aber weiteren Forschungen uberlassen werden mus. Obgleich sie morphologisch eine grose Ahnlichkeit mit den Bakterien besitzen, mussen sie doch aus vielerlei Grunden als eine gesonderte Parasitengruppe behandelt werden. Beim Oroyafieber des Menschen, einer in Peru vorkommenden bosartigen Erkrankung, sind sie als in den Erythrocyten gelegene Einschlusse schon langere Zeit bekannt. Im Tierreich scheinen sie als Krankheitserreger und anscheinend harmlose Blutschmarotzer verbreiteter zu sein, als man bisher annahm.

4 citations


Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1932
Abstract: Als „Verruga peruviana“ wird eine seit der Eroberung der Westkuste Sudamerikas durch dir Spainer bekannte, nur in den hochgelegenen talern der peruanischen Anden vorkommende, eigenartiage, knotige Hautefflorescenz genannten bezeichnet, die im Zusammenhang mit einer ihr vorausgehenden, Oroyafieber genannten Allgemeinerkrankung in Erscheinung tritt.

3 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Neutralizing antibody titrations were carried out in series of nonatopic human volunteers receiving one of the following ragweed preparations: (1) aqueous, (2) dialyzed aqueous, (3) alum precipitated, and (4) tannic acid precipitated extract. Also, extracts were made up to contain one of the following: (5) 10 per cent polyvinylpyrrolidone, (6) pertussis vaccine and (7) 2 per cent sodium gentisate. Number 8 was a preparation in an aluminum monostearateoil menstruum. A total of over 370,000 PNU of ragweed extract was administered during the course of 26 weekly injections. No singificant increase in neutralizing antibody was detected after such a series of injections.

2 citations