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Author

Jason R. Petta

Bio: Jason R. Petta is an academic researcher from Princeton University. The author has contributed to research in topic(s): Quantum dot & Qubit. The author has an hindex of 52, co-authored 160 publication(s) receiving 16030 citation(s). Previous affiliations of Jason R. Petta include University of California, Santa Barbara & Harvard University.
Topics: Quantum dot, Qubit, Photon, Quantum computer, Electron
Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
Jason R. Petta1, Jason R. Petta2, Jason R. Petta3, A. C. Johnson1  +23 moreInstitutions (3)
30 Sep 2005-Science
TL;DR: It is demonstrated coherent control of a quantum two-level system based on two-electron spin states in a double quantum dot, allowing state preparation, coherent manipulation, and projective readout based on rapid electrical control of the exchange interaction.
Abstract: We demonstrated coherent control of a quantum two-level system based on two-electron spin states in a double quantum dot, allowing state preparation, coherent manipulation, and projective readout. These techniques are based on rapid electrical control of the exchange interaction. Separating and later recombining a singlet spin state provided a measurement of the spin dephasing time, T2*, of E10 nanoseconds, limited by hyperfine interactions with the gallium arsenide host nuclei. Rabi oscillations of two-electron spin states were demonstrated, and spin-echo pulse sequences were used to suppress hyperfine-induced dephasing. Using these quantum control techniques, a coherence time for two-electron spin states exceeding 1 microsecond was observed.

2,573 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Ronald Hanson1, Leo P. Kouwenhoven2, Jason R. Petta3, Seigo Tarucha4  +1 moreInstitutions (4)
Abstract: The canonical example of a quantum-mechanical two-level system is spin. The simplest picture of spin is a magnetic moment pointing up or down. The full quantum properties of spin become apparent in phenomena such as superpositions of spin states, entanglement among spins, and quantum measurements. Many of these phenomena have been observed in experiments performed on ensembles of particles with spin. Only in recent years have systems been realized in which individual electrons can be trapped and their quantum properties can be studied, thus avoiding unnecessary ensemble averaging. This review describes experiments performed with quantum dots, which are nanometer-scale boxes defined in a semiconductor host material. Quantum dots can hold a precise but tunable number of electron spins starting with 0, 1, 2, etc. Electrical contacts can be made for charge transport measurements and electrostatic gates can be used for controlling the dot potential. This system provides virtually full control over individual electrons. This new, enabling technology is stimulating research on individual spins. This review describes the physics of spins in quantum dots containing one or two electrons, from an experimentalist’s viewpoint. Various methods for extracting spin properties from experiment are presented, restricted exclusively to electrical measurements. Furthermore, experimental techniques are discussed that allow for 1 the rotation of an electron spin into a superposition of up and down, 2 the measurement of the quantum state of an individual spin, and 3 the control of the interaction between two neighboring spins by the Heisenberg exchange interaction. Finally, the physics of the relevant relaxation and dephasing mechanisms is reviewed and experimental results are compared with theories for spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions. All these subjects are directly relevant for the fields of quantum information processing and spintronics with single spins i.e., single spintronics.

2,134 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Jiwoong Park1, Jiwoong Park2, Abhay Pasupathy2, Jonas I. Goldsmith2  +8 moreInstitutions (2)
13 Jun 2002-Nature
TL;DR: Two related molecules containing a Co ion bonded to polypyridyl ligands, attached to insulating tethers of different lengths are examined, enabling the fabrication of devices that exhibit either single-electron phenomena, such as Coulomb blockade or the Kondo effect.
Abstract: Using molecules as electronic components is a powerful new direction in the science and technology of nanometre-scale systems1. Experiments to date have examined a multitude of molecules conducting in parallel2,3, or, in some cases, transport through single molecules. The latter includes molecules probed in a two-terminal geometry using mechanically controlled break junctions4,5 or scanning probes6,7 as well as three-terminal single-molecule transistors made from carbon nanotubes8, C60 molecules9, and conjugated molecules diluted in a less-conducting molecular layer10. The ultimate limit would be a device where electrons hop on to, and off from, a single atom between two contacts. Here we describe transistors incorporating a transition-metal complex designed so that electron transport occurs through well-defined charge states of a single atom. We examine two related molecules containing a Co ion bonded to polypyridyl ligands, attached to insulating tethers of different lengths. Changing the length of the insulating tether alters the coupling of the ion to the electrodes, enabling the fabrication of devices that exhibit either single-electron phenomena, such as Coulomb blockade, or the Kondo effect.

1,751 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
08 Mar 2013-Science
TL;DR: The past decade has seen remarkable progress in isolating and controlling quantum coherence using charges and spins in semiconductors, and electron spin coherence times now exceed several seconds, a nine-fold increase in coherence compared with the first semiconductor qubits.
Abstract: The past decade has seen remarkable progress in isolating and controlling quantum coherence using charges and spins in semiconductors. Quantum control has been established at room temperature, and electron spin coherence times now exceed several seconds, a nine–order-of-magnitude increase in coherence compared with the first semiconductor qubits. These coherence times rival those traditionally found only in atomic systems, ushering in a new era of ultracoherent spintronics. We review recent advances in quantum measurements, coherent control, and the generation of entangled states and describe some of the challenges that remain for processing quantum information with spins in semiconductors.

615 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
D. M. Zajac1, A. J. Sigillito1, Maximilian Russ2, F. Borjans1  +4 moreInstitutions (4)
26 Jan 2018-Science
TL;DR: An efficient resonantly driven CNOT gate for electron spins in silicon is demonstrated and used to create an entangled quantum state called the Bell state with 78% fidelity, which enables multi-qubit algorithms in silicon.
Abstract: Single-qubit rotations and two-qubit CNOT operations are crucial ingredients for universal quantum computing. Although high-fidelity single-qubit operations have been achieved using the electron spin degree of freedom, realizing a robust CNOT gate has been challenging because of rapid nuclear spin dephasing and charge noise. We demonstrate an efficient resonantly driven CNOT gate for electron spins in silicon. Our platform achieves single-qubit rotations with fidelities greater than 99%, as verified by randomized benchmarking. Gate control of the exchange coupling allows a quantum CNOT gate to be implemented with resonant driving in ~200 nanoseconds. We used the CNOT gate to generate a Bell state with 78% fidelity (corrected for errors in state preparation and measurement). Our quantum dot device architecture enables multi-qubit algorithms in silicon.

456 citations


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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Although gold is the subject of one of the most ancient themes of investigation in science, its renaissance now leads to an exponentially increasing number of publications, especially in the context of emerging nanoscience and nanotechnology with nanoparticles and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). We will limit the present review to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), also called gold colloids. AuNPs are the most stable metal nanoparticles, and they present fascinating aspects such as their assembly of multiple types involving materials science, the behavior of the individual particles, size-related electronic, magnetic and optical properties (quantum size effect), and their applications to catalysis and biology. Their promises are in these fields as well as in the bottom-up approach of nanotechnology, and they will be key materials and building block in the 21st century. Whereas the extraction of gold started in the 5th millennium B.C. near Varna (Bulgaria) and reached 10 tons per year in Egypt around 1200-1300 B.C. when the marvelous statue of Touthankamon was constructed, it is probable that “soluble” gold appeared around the 5th or 4th century B.C. in Egypt and China. In antiquity, materials were used in an ecological sense for both aesthetic and curative purposes. Colloidal gold was used to make ruby glass 293 Chem. Rev. 2004, 104, 293−346

11,193 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Spintronics, or spin electronics, involves the study of active control and manipulation of spin degrees of freedom in solid-state systems. This article reviews the current status of this subject, including both recent advances and well-established results. The primary focus is on the basic physical principles underlying the generation of carrier spin polarization, spin dynamics, and spin-polarized transport in semiconductors and metals. Spin transport differs from charge transport in that spin is a nonconserved quantity in solids due to spin-orbit and hyperfine coupling. The authors discuss in detail spin decoherence mechanisms in metals and semiconductors. Various theories of spin injection and spin-polarized transport are applied to hybrid structures relevant to spin-based devices and fundamental studies of materials properties. Experimental work is reviewed with the emphasis on projected applications, in which external electric and magnetic fields and illumination by light will be used to control spin and charge dynamics to create new functionalities not feasible or ineffective with conventional electronics.

8,325 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
Jason R. Petta1, Jason R. Petta2, Jason R. Petta3, A. C. Johnson3  +23 moreInstitutions (3)
30 Sep 2005-Science
TL;DR: It is demonstrated coherent control of a quantum two-level system based on two-electron spin states in a double quantum dot, allowing state preparation, coherent manipulation, and projective readout based on rapid electrical control of the exchange interaction.
Abstract: We demonstrated coherent control of a quantum two-level system based on two-electron spin states in a double quantum dot, allowing state preparation, coherent manipulation, and projective readout. These techniques are based on rapid electrical control of the exchange interaction. Separating and later recombining a singlet spin state provided a measurement of the spin dephasing time, T2*, of E10 nanoseconds, limited by hyperfine interactions with the gallium arsenide host nuclei. Rabi oscillations of two-electron spin states were demonstrated, and spin-echo pulse sequences were used to suppress hyperfine-induced dephasing. Using these quantum control techniques, a coherence time for two-electron spin states exceeding 1 microsecond was observed.

2,573 citations


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Performance
Metrics

Author's H-index: 52

No. of papers from the Author in previous years
YearPapers
20215
202011
201915
201813
201711
201611