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Journal ArticleDOI

Assessment of Urban Dynamics to Understand Spatiotemporal Differentiation at Various Scales Using Remote Sensing and Geospatial Tools

21 Apr 2020-Remote Sensing (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)-Vol. 12, Iss: 8, pp 1306
TL;DR: An integrated analysis on urban expansion in Srinagar city and surrounding areas from 1999 to 2017 at multiple scales is performed in order to assist urban planning initiatives and support the supposition that there is a continuum in the diffusion-coalescence process.
Abstract: Analysis of urban dynamics is a pivotal step towards understanding landscape changes and developing scientifically sound urban management strategies. Delineating the patterns and processes shaping the evolution of urban regions is an essential part of this step. Utilizing remote-sensing techniques and Geographic Information System (GIS) tools, we performed an integrated analysis on urban expansion in Srinagar city and surrounding areas from 1999 to 2017 at multiple scales in order to assist urban planning initiatives. To capture various spatial indicators of expansion, we analysed (i) land use/land cover (LULC) changes, (ii) rate and intensity of changes to built-up areas, (iii) spatial differentiation in landscape metrics (at 500, 1000 and 2000 m cell-size), and (iv) growth type of the urban expansion. Global Moran’s I statistics and local indicators of spatial association (LISA) were also employed to identify hotspots of change in landscape structure. Our methodology utilizes a range of geovisualization tools which are capable of appropriately addressing various elements required for strategic planning in growing cities. The results highlight aggregation and homogenization of the urban core as well as irregularity and fragmentation in its periphery. A combination of spatial metrics and growth type analysis supports the supposition that there is a continuum in the diffusion-coalescence process. This allows us to extend our understanding of urban growth theory and to report deviations from accepted stages of growth. As our results show, each dominating growth phase of the city—both diffusion (1999) and coalescence (2009 and 2017)—is interspersed with features from the other type. An improved understanding of spatial differentiation and the identification of hotspots can serve to make urban planning more tailored to such local conditions. An important insight derived from the results is the applicability of remote-sensing data in urban planning measures and the usefulness of freely available medium resolution data in gaining a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of cities.
Citations
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the couple rapid urbanization and policy failure in controlling urban expansion was sometimes associated to soil and land degradation phenomena in both developing and developed countries, in both developed and developing countries.
Abstract: The couple rapid urbanization and policy failure in controlling urban expansion was sometimes associated to soil and land degradation phenomena in both developing and developed countries. This work...

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Zhang et al. as discussed by the authors used concentric buffer zones to explore the characteristics and relationship between landscape pattern indexes (LPIs) and ecosystem service values (ESVs) in the rural-urban gradient to reveal the impact of urban development on urban ecosystems.
Abstract: Urbanization has substantially changed landscape patterns and seriously disturbed the structure and function of the ecosystems. However, the spatial characteristics and relationships between landscape patterns and ecosystem service values (ESVs) along the urban-rural gradient remain unclear. Based on high-resolution images, this study used concentric buffer zones to explore the characteristics and relationship between landscape pattern indexes (LPIs) and ESVs in the rural-urban gradient to reveal the impact of urban development on urban ecosystems. The results showed that the landscape heterogeneity was high in the urban fringe 18-20 km from the urban center. The PD, ED, LSI, SHAPE_MN, DIVISION, SPLIT, and SHIDI variables had the lowest values in the urban center, while CONTAG and AI had the high values in the urban. Water bodies and forest land are the main land use/land cover (LULC) types that provide ecosystem services. The total ESV of Kunshan city totaled 5597.31 × 106 CNY in 2018. The average ESV increased from 2.42 × 106 CNY to 9.92 × 106 CNY along the urban-rural gradient, which indicated that natural landscapes had higher ESVs. ED and Landscape Division Index (DIVISION) had positive effects on ESV, while Largest Patch Index (LPI), Contagion (CONTAG), Proportion of Like Adjacencies (PLADJ), Patch Cohesion Index (COHESION), and Aggregation Index (AI) had negative effects on ESV. The results of the regression model indicated there were quantitative relationships between ESVs and LPIs, which revealed how landscape pattern affected ESVs. The study can provide a scientific reference for the optimization of urban landscape patterns and urban and rural sustainable development.

10 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an image is divided into spatially continuous, disjoint, and spatial-temporal segments. But the classification of the segmentations is not addressed in this paper.
Abstract: Segmentation and classification are two imperative, yet challenging tasks in image analysis for remote-sensing applications. In the former, an image is divided into spatially continuous, disjoint, ...

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors introduce the concept of peripheral urbanization to investigate logics of the production of the urban that differ from those of the North Atlantic, as a means of exploring processes of socio-spatial formation and theory-making.
Abstract: Introduction In her pathbreaking essay on modes of production of urban space in the global South, anthropologist Teresa Caldeira (2017) deploys the concept of “peripheral urbanization” to conjure “a problem-space that allows us to investigate logics of the production of the urban that differ from those of the North Atlantic … as a means of exploring processes of both socio-spatial formation and theory-making” (p. 4). Along similar lines, in this special issue, we invoke the concept of the per...

8 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Urban volumetry using the Building 3D Density Index (B3DI) in 2001, 2010, 2019, and quantifies changes in the volume of buildings and urban expansion in Luxembourg City over the last two decades is explored.
Abstract: Understanding how, where, and when a city is expanding can inform better ways to make our cities more resilient, sustainable, and equitable. This paper explores urban volumetry using the Building 3D Density Index (B3DI) in 2001, 2010, 2019, and quantifies changes in the volume of buildings and urban expansion in Luxembourg City over the last two decades. For this purpose, we use airborne laser scanning (ALS) point cloud (2019) and geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) of aerial orthophotos (2001, 2010) to extract 3D models, footprints of buildings and calculate the volume of individual buildings and B3DI in the frame of a 100 × 100 m grid, at the level of parcels, districts, and city scale. Findings indicate that the B3DI has notably increased in the past 20 years from 0.77 m3/m2 (2001) to 0.9 m3/m2 (2010) to 1.09 m3/m2 (2019). Further, the increase in the volume of buildings between 2001–2019 was +16 million m3. The general trend of changes in the cubic capacity of buildings per resident shows a decrease from 522 m3/resident in 2001, to 460 m3/resident in 2019, which, with the simultaneous appearance of new buildings and fast population growth, represents the dynamic development of the city.

5 citations


Cites background from "Assessment of Urban Dynamics to Und..."

  • ...Increasing demands in urban management sectors need the coordinated use of remote sensing and a geographic information system (GIS) for monitoring urban intensification [1]....

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Journal ArticleDOI
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