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Siew-Chong Tan

Bio: Siew-Chong Tan is an academic researcher from University of Hong Kong. The author has contributed to research in topics: Converters & Capacitor. The author has an hindex of 43, co-authored 246 publications receiving 7291 citations. Previous affiliations of Siew-Chong Tan include Hong Kong Polytechnic University & University of Surrey.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It has been shown that the use of SM control can lead to an improved robustness in providing consistent transient responses over a wide range of operating conditions and is compared with that of conventional linear control in terms of transient characteristics.
Abstract: This paper examines the practical design issues of sliding-mode (SM) controllers as applied to the control of dc-dc converters. A comprehensive review of the relevant literature is first provided. Major problems that prevent the use of SM control in dc-dc converters for industrial and commercial applications are investigated. Possible solutions are derived, and practical design procedures are outlined. The performance of SM control is compared with that of conventional linear control in terms of transient characteristics. It has been shown that the use of SM control can lead to an improved robustness in providing consistent transient responses over a wide range of operating conditions.

527 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Shu Wang1, Xinbo Ruan1, Kai Yao1, Siew-Chong Tan, Yang Yang1, Zhihong Ye 
16 Dec 2011
TL;DR: In this paper, a flick-free electrolytic capacitor-less single-phase ac-dc driver for LED lighting is proposed, which consists of an electrolytic capacitive-less PFC converter and a bidirectional converter, which serves to absorb the ac component of the pulsating current of the PFC converters.
Abstract: The electrolytic capacitor is the key component that limits the operating lifetime of LED drivers. If an ac-dc LED driver with power factor correction (PFC) control is allowed to output a pulsating current for driving the LEDs, the electrolytic capacitor will no longer be required. However, this pulsating current will introduce light flicker that varies at twice the power line frequency. In this paper, a configuration of flicker-free electrolytic capacitor-less single-phase ac-dc driver for LED lighting is proposed. The configuration comprises an electrolytic capacitor-less PFC converter and a bidirectional converter, which serves to absorb the ac component of the pulsating current of the PFC converter, leaving only a dc component to drive the LEDs. The output filter capacitor of the bidirectional converter is intentionally designed to have a large voltage ripple, thus its capacitance can be greatly reduced. Consequently, film capacitors can be used instead of electrolytic capacitors, leading to the realization of a flicker-free ac-dc LED driver that has a long lifetime. The proposed solution is generally applicable to all single-phase PFC converters. A prototype with 48-V, 0.7-A output is constructed and tested. Experimental results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the flick-free electrolytic capacitor-less ac-dc LED driver.

366 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper presents a simple and systematic approach to the design of a practical sliding mode voltage controller for buck converters operating in continuous conduction mode.
Abstract: This paper presents a simple and systematic approach to the design of a practical sliding mode voltage controller for buck converters operating in continuous conduction mode. Various aspects of the design, including the associated practical problems and the proposed solutions, are detailed. A simple and easy-to-follow design procedure is also described. Experimental results are presented to illustrate the design procedure.

310 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A simple unified approach to the design of fixed-frequency pulsewidth-modulation-based sliding-mode controllers for dc-dc converters operating in the continuous conduction mode is presented.
Abstract: This paper presents a simple unified approach to the design of fixed-frequency pulsewidth-modulation-based sliding-mode controllers for dc-dc converters operating in the continuous conduction mode. The design methodology is illustrated on the three primary dc-dc converters: buck, boost, and buck-boost converters. To illustrate the feasibility of the scheme, an experimental prototype of the derived boost controller/converter system is developed. Several tests are performed to validate the functionalities of the system

289 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown that TL converters are highly suitable for high input/output voltage and medium-to-high-power dc-dc power conversions and the virtues and drawbacks of these converters as compared to conventional converters.
Abstract: This paper discusses the basic family of three-level (TL) dc-dc converters. The origin of TL converters and their basic topological variations are described. Systematic procedures leading to improved and simplified circuit topologies are discussed. A feedforward control scheme that ensures the proper functioning of these converters is proposed. Moreover, the virtues and drawbacks of these converters as compared to conventional converters are highlighted. In particular, the advantages of TL converters include reduced voltage stress of the switches, reduced filter size, and improved dynamic response. It is shown that TL converters are highly suitable for high input/output voltage and medium-to-high-power dc-dc power conversions.

239 citations


Cited by
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present the current status and implementation of battery chargers, charging power levels, and infrastructure for plug-in electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles and classify them into off-board and on-board types with unidirectional or bidirectional power flow.
Abstract: This paper reviews the current status and implementation of battery chargers, charging power levels, and infrastructure for plug-in electric vehicles and hybrids. Charger systems are categorized into off-board and on-board types with unidirectional or bidirectional power flow. Unidirectional charging limits hardware requirements and simplifies interconnection issues. Bidirectional charging supports battery energy injection back to the grid. Typical on-board chargers restrict power because of weight, space, and cost constraints. They can be integrated with the electric drive to avoid these problems. The availability of charging infrastructure reduces on-board energy storage requirements and costs. On-board charger systems can be conductive or inductive. An off-board charger can be designed for high charging rates and is less constrained by size and weight. Level 1 (convenience), Level 2 (primary), and Level 3 (fast) power levels are discussed. Future aspects such as roadbed charging are presented. Various power level chargers and infrastructure configurations are presented, compared, and evaluated based on amount of power, charging time and location, cost, equipment, and other factors.

2,327 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, two major figures in adaptive control provide a wealth of material for researchers, practitioners, and students to enhance their work through the information on many new theoretical developments, and can be used by mathematical control theory specialists to adapt their research to practical needs.
Abstract: This book, written by two major figures in adaptive control, provides a wealth of material for researchers, practitioners, and students. While some researchers in adaptive control may note the absence of a particular topic, the book‘s scope represents a high-gain instrument. It can be used by designers of control systems to enhance their work through the information on many new theoretical developments, and can be used by mathematical control theory specialists to adapt their research to practical needs. The book is strongly recommended to anyone interested in adaptive control.

1,814 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1977-Nature
TL;DR: Bergh and P.J.Dean as discussed by the authors proposed a light-emitting diode (LEDD) for light-aware Diodes, which was shown to have promising performance.
Abstract: Light-Emitting Diodes. (Monographs in Electrical and Electronic Engineering.) By A. A. Bergh and P. J. Dean. Pp. viii+591. (Clarendon: Oxford; Oxford University: London, 1976.) £22.

1,560 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The feasibility and great potential of FCS-MPC due to present-day signal-processing capabilities, particularly for power systems with a reduced number of switching states and more complex operating principles, such as matrix converters are found.
Abstract: This paper presents a detailed description of finite control set model predictive control (FCS-MPC) applied to power converters Several key aspects related to this methodology are, in depth, presented and compared with traditional power converter control techniques, such as linear controllers with pulsewidth-modulation-based methods The basic concepts, operating principles, control diagrams, and results are used to provide a comparison between the different control strategies The analysis is performed on a traditional three-phase voltage source inverter, used as a simple and comprehensive reference frame However, additional topologies and power systems are addressed to highlight differences, potentialities, and challenges of FCS-MPC Among the conclusions are the feasibility and great potential of FCS-MPC due to present-day signal-processing capabilities, particularly for power systems with a reduced number of switching states and more complex operating principles, such as matrix converters In addition, the possibility to address different or additional control objectives easily in a single cost function enables a simple, flexible, and improved performance controller for power-conversion systems

1,554 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors comprehensively review and classify various step-up dc-dc converters based on their characteristics and voltage-boosting techniques, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these voltage boosting techniques and associated converters.
Abstract: DC–DC converters with voltage boost capability are widely used in a large number of power conversion applications, from fraction-of-volt to tens of thousands of volts at power levels from milliwatts to megawatts. The literature has reported on various voltage-boosting techniques, in which fundamental energy storing elements (inductors and capacitors) and/or transformers in conjunction with switch(es) and diode(s) are utilized in the circuit. These techniques include switched capacitor (charge pump), voltage multiplier, switched inductor/voltage lift, magnetic coupling, and multistage/-level, and each has its own merits and demerits depending on application, in terms of cost, complexity, power density, reliability, and efficiency. To meet the growing demand for such applications, new power converter topologies that use the above voltage-boosting techniques, as well as some active and passive components, are continuously being proposed. The permutations and combinations of the various voltage-boosting techniques with additional components in a circuit allow for numerous new topologies and configurations, which are often confusing and difficult to follow. Therefore, to present a clear picture on the general law and framework of the development of next-generation step-up dc–dc converters, this paper aims to comprehensively review and classify various step-up dc–dc converters based on their characteristics and voltage-boosting techniques. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of these voltage-boosting techniques and associated converters are discussed in detail. Finally, broad applications of dc–dc converters are presented and summarized with comparative study of different voltage-boosting techniques.

1,230 citations