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Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format
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Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format Example of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 15680266 e-ISSN: 18734294

Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry — Template for authors

Publisher: Bentham Science
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Drug Discovery #36 of 145 up up by 5 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 809 Published Papers | 4975 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 29/06/2020
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General info
Top papers
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FAQ

Journal Performance & Insights

  • Impact Factor
  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

Impact factor determines the importance of a journal by taking a measure of frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year.

3.218

7% from 2018

Impact factor for Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2019
Year Value
2019 3.218
2018 3.442
2017 3.374
2016 2.561
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • Impact factor of this journal has decreased by 7% in last year.
  • This journal’s impact factor is in the top 10 percentile category.

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

6.1

8% from 2019

CiteRatio for Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 6.1
2019 6.6
2018 5.7
2017 5.0
2016 5.2
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has decreased by 8% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

0.706

10% from 2019

SJR for Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.706
2019 0.788
2018 0.878
2017 0.885
2016 0.879
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 10% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

0.82

9% from 2019

SNIP for Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 0.82
2019 0.902
2018 0.882
2017 0.793
2016 0.778
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 9% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

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CiteRatio: 6.3 | SJR: 1.164 | SNIP: 1.413
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Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

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Bentham Science

Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry is a forum for the review of areas of keen and topical interest to medicinal chemists and others in the allied disciplines. Each issue is solely devoted to a specific topic, containing six to nine reviews, which provide the reader a compre...... Read More

i
Last updated on
29 Jun 2020
i
ISSN
1568-0266
i
Impact Factor
High - 2.561
i
Acceptance Rate
Not provided
i
Frequency
Not provided
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Yellow faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
i
Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
Vancouver
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Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
Blonder, G E, Tinkham, M, & Klapwijk, T M. Transition from metallic to tunnel- ing regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion. Phys. Rev. B. 2013;87(10):100510.

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1568026013394831
Toxic Metals and Oxidative Stress Part I: Mechanisms Involved in Me-tal induced Oxidative Damage
Nuran Ercal1, Hande Gurer-Orhan, Nukhet Aykin-Burns

Abstract:

Toxic metals (lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic) are widely found in our environment. Humans are exposed to these metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food. Recent studies indicate that transition metals act as catalysts in the oxidative reactions of biological macromolecules therefore th... Toxic metals (lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic) are widely found in our environment. Humans are exposed to these metals from numerous sources, including contaminated air, water, soil and food. Recent studies indicate that transition metals act as catalysts in the oxidative reactions of biological macromolecules therefore the toxicities associated with these metals might be due to oxidative tissue damage. Redox-active metals, such as iron, copper and chromium, undergo redox cycling whereas redox-inactive metals, such as lead, cadmium, mercury and others deplete cells major antioxidants, particularly thiol-containing antioxidants and enzymes. Either redox-active or redox-inactive metals may cause an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical (HO.), superoxide radical (O2.-) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Enhanced generation of ROS can overwhelm cells intrinsic antioxidant defenses, and result in a condition known as “oxidative stress”. Cells under oxidative stress display various dysfunctions due to lesions caused by ROS to lipids, proteins and DNA. Consequently, it is suggested that metal-induced oxidative stress in cells can be partially responsible for the toxic effects of heavy metals. Several studies are underway to determine the effect of antioxidant supplementation following heavy metal exposure. Data suggest that antioxidants may play an important role in abating some hazards of heavy metals. In order to prove the importance of using antioxidants in heavy metal poisoning, pertinent biochemical mechanisms for metal-induced oxidative stress should be reviewed. read more read less

Topics:

Oxidative stress (59%)59% related to the paper, Metal poisoning (55%)55% related to the paper, Reactive oxygen species (52%)52% related to the paper, Antioxidant (50%)50% related to the paper
1,568 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1568026023394443
Chemical and physical properties and potential mechanisms: melatonin as a broad spectrum antioxidant and free radical scavenger.

Abstract:

Melatonin was found to be a potent free radical scavenger in 1993. Since then over 800 publications have directly or indirectly confirmed this observation. Melatonin scavenges a variety of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species including hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen, nitric oxide and peroxynitrite anion. ... Melatonin was found to be a potent free radical scavenger in 1993. Since then over 800 publications have directly or indirectly confirmed this observation. Melatonin scavenges a variety of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species including hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen, nitric oxide and peroxynitrite anion. Based on the analyses of structure-activity relationships, the indole moiety of the melatonin molecule is the reactive center of interaction with oxidants due to its high resonance stability and very low activation energy barrier towards the free radical reactions. However, the methoxy and amide side chains also contribute significantly to melatonins antioxidant capacity. The N-C=O structure in the C3 amide side chain is the functional group. The carbonyl group in the structure of N-C=O is key for melatonin to scavenge the second reactive species and the nitrogen in the N-C=O structure is necessary for melatonin to form the new five membered ring after melatonins interaction with a reactive species. The methoxy group in C5 appears to keep melatonin from exhibiting prooxidative activity. If the methoxy group is replaced by a hydroxyl group, under some in vitro conditions, the antioxidant capacity of this molecule may be enhanced. However, the cost of this change are decreased lipophility and increased prooxidative potential. Therefore, in in vivo studies the antioxidant efficacy of melatonin appears to be superior to its hydroxylated counterpart. The mechanisms of melatonins interaction with reactive species probably involves donation of an electron to form the melatoninyl cation radical or through an radical addition at the site C3. Other possibilities include hydrogen donation from the nitrogen atom or substitution at position C2, C4 and C7 and nitrosation. Melatonin also has the ability to repair damaged biomolecules as shown by the fact that it converts the guanosine radical to guanosine by electron transfer. Unlike the classical antioxidants, melatonin is devoid of prooxid ative activity and all known intermediates generated by the interaction of melatonin with reactive species are also free radical scavengers. This phenomenon is defined as the free radical scavenging cascade reaction of the melatonin family. Due to this cascade, one melatonin molecule has the potential to scavenge up to 4 or more reactive species. This makes melatonin very effective as an antioxidant. Under in vivo conditions, melatonin is often several times more potent than vitamin C and E in protecting tissues from oxidative injury when compared at an equivalent dosage (mmol / kg). Future research in the field of melatonin as a free radical scavenger might be focused on: 1), signal transduction and antioxidant enzyme gene expression induced by melatonin and its metabolites, 2), melatonin levels in tissues and in cells, 3), melatonin structure modifications, 4), melatonin and its metabolites in plants and, 5), clinical trials using melatonin to treat free radical related diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkin sons, stroke and heart disease. read more read less

Topics:

Free radical scavenger (64%)64% related to the paper, Melatonin (63%)63% related to the paper, Hydroxyl radical (55%)55% related to the paper, Antioxidant (53%)53% related to the paper
910 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1568026023393507
Subunit composition, distribution and function of GABA(A) receptor subtypes.
Werner Sieghart1, Günther Sperk

Abstract:

GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the site of action of many clinically important drugs. These receptors are composed of five subunits that can belong to eight different subunit classes. Depending on their subunit composition, these receptors exhibit distinct pharmacolo... GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the site of action of many clinically important drugs. These receptors are composed of five subunits that can belong to eight different subunit classes. Depending on their subunit composition, these receptors exhibit distinct pharmacological and electrophysiological properties. Recent studies on recombinant and native GABA(A) receptors suggest the existence of far more receptor subtypes than previously assumed. Thus, receptors composed of one, two, three, four, or five different subunits might exist in the brain. Studies on the regional, cellular and subcellular distribution of GABA(A) receptor subunits, and on the co-localization of these subunits at the light and electron microscopic level for the first time provide information on the distribution of GABA(A) receptor subtypes in the brain. These studies will have to be complemented by electrophysiological and pharmacological studies on the respective recombinant and native receptors to finally identify the receptor subtypes present in the brain. The distinct cellular and subcellular location of individual receptor subtypes suggests that they exhibit specific functions in the brain that can be selectively modulated by subtype specific drugs. This conclusion is supported by the recent demonstration that different GABA(A) receptor subtypes mediate different effects of benzodiazepines. Together, these results should cause a revival of GABA(A) receptor research and strongly stimulate the development of drugs with a higher selectivity for alpha2-, alpha3-, or alpha5-subunit-containing receptor subtypes. Such drugs might exhibit quite selective clinical effects. read more read less

Topics:

Receptor (58%)58% related to the paper, GABAA receptor (56%)56% related to the paper, Interleukin 5 receptor alpha subunit (55%)55% related to the paper, Interleukin 10 receptor, alpha subunit (54%)54% related to the paper, Protein subunit (51%)51% related to the paper
851 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/1568026615666150915111741
Sulfur Containing Scaffolds in Drugs: Synthesis and Application in Medicinal Chemistry
Minghao Feng, Bingqing Tang, Steven H. Liang, Xuefeng Jiang1

Abstract:

The impact of the development of sulfur therapeutics is instrumental to the evolution of the pharmaceutical industry. Sulfur-derived functional groups can be found in a broad range of pharmaceuticals and natural products. For centuries, sulfur continues to maintain its status as the dominating heteroatom integrated into a set... The impact of the development of sulfur therapeutics is instrumental to the evolution of the pharmaceutical industry. Sulfur-derived functional groups can be found in a broad range of pharmaceuticals and natural products. For centuries, sulfur continues to maintain its status as the dominating heteroatom integrated into a set of 362 sulfur-containing FDA approved drugs (besides oxygen or nitrogen) through the present. Sulfonamides, thioethers, sulfones and Penicillin are the most common scaffolds in sulfur containing drugs, which are well studied both on synthesis and application during the past decades. In this review, these four moieties in pharmaceuticals and recent advances in the synthesis of the corresponding core scaffolds are presented. read more read less
670 Citations
open accessOpen access Journal Article DOI: 10.2174/156802608783790901
Surface chemistry influences implant biocompatibility.
Paul Thevenot1, Wenjing Hu1, Liping Tang

Abstract:

Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major nee... Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. read more read less

Topics:

Modern medicine (52%)52% related to the paper
608 Citations
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Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry format uses Vancouver citation style.

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RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
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