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Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format
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Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format Example of Progress in Oceanography format
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open access Open Access ISSN: 796611
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Progress in Oceanography — Template for authors

Publisher: Elsevier
Categories Rank Trend in last 3 yrs
Aquatic Science #12 of 224 down down by 10 ranks
Geology #24 of 251 down down by 16 ranks
journal-quality-icon Journal quality:
High
calendar-icon Last 4 years overview: 598 Published Papers | 3873 Citations
indexed-in-icon Indexed in: Scopus
last-updated-icon Last updated: 06/07/2020
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Journal Performance & Insights

  • CiteRatio
  • SJR
  • SNIP

CiteRatio is a measure of average citations received per peer-reviewed paper published in the journal.

6.5

16% from 2019

CiteRatio for Progress in Oceanography from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 6.5
2019 5.6
2018 8.3
2017 8.0
2016 7.1
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • CiteRatio of this journal has increased by 16% in last years.
  • This journal’s CiteRatio is in the top 10 percentile category.

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) measures weighted citations received by the journal. Citation weighting depends on the categories and prestige of the citing journal.

1.487

18% from 2019

SJR for Progress in Oceanography from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.487
2019 1.803
2018 2.357
2017 2.192
2016 1.944
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SJR of this journal has decreased by 18% in last years.
  • This journal’s SJR is in the top 10 percentile category.

Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) measures actual citations received relative to citations expected for the journal's category.

1.517

3% from 2019

SNIP for Progress in Oceanography from 2016 - 2020
Year Value
2020 1.517
2019 1.562
2018 1.603
2017 1.591
2016 1.303
graph view Graph view
table view Table view

insights Insights

  • SNIP of this journal has decreased by 3% in last years.
  • This journal’s SNIP is in the top 10 percentile category.

Related Journals

open access Open Access ISSN: 2784343

Elsevier

CiteRatio: 5.0 | SJR: 0.893 | SNIP: 1.196
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Hindawi

CiteRatio: 3.1 | SJR: 0.429 | SNIP: 1.331
open access Open Access ISSN: 167568 e-ISSN: 14695081

Cambridge University Press

CiteRatio: 4.2 | SJR: 0.935 | SNIP: 1.026
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Oxford University Press

CiteRatio: 3.9 | SJR: 0.87 | SNIP: 0.911

Progress in Oceanography

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Elsevier

Progress in Oceanography

Progress in Oceanography publishes the longer, more comprehensive papers that most oceanographers feel are necessary, on occasion, to do justice to their work. Contributions are generally either a review of an aspect of oceanography or a treatise on an expanding oceanographic ...... Read More

Aquatic Science

Geology

Agricultural and Biological Sciences

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Last updated on
05 Jul 2020
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ISSN
0079-6611
i
Impact Factor
High - 1.602
i
Open Access
Yes
i
Sherpa RoMEO Archiving Policy
Green faq
i
Plagiarism Check
Available via Turnitin
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Endnote Style
Download Available
i
Bibliography Name
elsarticle-num
i
Citation Type
Numbered
[25]
i
Bibliography Example
G. E. Blonder, M. Tinkham, T. M. Klapwijk, Transition from metallic to tunneling regimes in superconducting microconstrictions: Excess current, charge imbalance, and supercurrent conversion, Phys. Rev. B 25 (7) (1982) 4515–4532. URL 10.1103/PhysRevB.25.4515

Top papers written in this journal

Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/S0079-6611(00)00033-1
Empirical evidence for North Pacific regime shifts in 1977 and 1989
Steven R. Hare1, Nathan J. Mantua2
01 Oct 2000 - Progress in Oceanography

Abstract:

It is now widely accepted that a climatic regime shift transpired in the North Pacific Ocean in the winter of 1976–77. This regime shift has had far reaching consequences for the large marine ecosystems of the North Pacific. Despite the strength and scope of the changes initiated by the shift, it was 10–15 years before it was... It is now widely accepted that a climatic regime shift transpired in the North Pacific Ocean in the winter of 1976–77. This regime shift has had far reaching consequences for the large marine ecosystems of the North Pacific. Despite the strength and scope of the changes initiated by the shift, it was 10–15 years before it was fully recognized. Subsequent research has suggested that this event was not unique in the historical record but merely the latest in a succession of climatic regime shifts. In this study, we assembled 100 environmental time series, 31 climatic and 69 biological, to determine if there is evidence for common regime signals in the 1965–1997 period of record. Our analysis reproduces previously documented features of the 1977 regime shift, and identifies a further shift in 1989 in some components of the North Pacific ecosystem. The 1989 changes were neither as pervasive as the 1977 changes nor did they signal a simple return to pre-1977 conditions. A notable feature of the 1989 regime shift is the relative clarity that is found in biological records, which contrasts with the relative lack of clear changes expressed by indices of Pacific climate. Thus, the large marine ecosystems of the North Pacific and Bering Sea appear to filter climate variability strongly, and respond nonlinearly to environmental forcing. We conclude that monitoring North Pacific and Bering Sea ecosystems may allow for an earlier identification of regime shifts than is possible from monitoring climate data alone. read more read less

Topics:

Regime shift (63%)63% related to the paper, Marine ecosystem (51%)51% related to the paper
1,454 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/J.POCEAN.2011.01.002
Global observations of nonlinear mesoscale eddies
Dudley B. Chelton1, Michael G. Schlax1, Roger M. Samelson1
01 Oct 2011 - Progress in Oceanography

Abstract:

Sixteen years of sea-surface height (SSH) fields constructed by merging the measurements from two simultaneously operating altimeters are analyzed to investigate mesoscale variability in the global ocean The prevalence of coherent mesoscale features (referred to here as “eddies”) with radius scales of O(100 km) is readily app... Sixteen years of sea-surface height (SSH) fields constructed by merging the measurements from two simultaneously operating altimeters are analyzed to investigate mesoscale variability in the global ocean The prevalence of coherent mesoscale features (referred to here as “eddies”) with radius scales of O(100 km) is readily apparent in these high-resolution SSH fields An automated procedure for identifying and tracking mesoscale features based on their SSH signatures yields 35,891 eddies with lifetimes ⩾16 weeks These long-lived eddies, comprising approximately 115 million individual eddy observations, have an average lifetime of 32 weeks and an average propagation distance of 550 km Their mean amplitude and a speed-based radius scale as defined by the automated procedure are 8 cm and 90 km, respectively The tracked eddies are found to originate nearly everywhere in the World Ocean, consistent with previous conclusions that virtually all of the World Ocean is baroclinically unstable Overall, there is a slight preference for cyclonic eddies However, there is a preference for the eddies with long lifetimes and large propagation distances to be anticyclonic In the southern hemisphere, the distributions of the amplitudes and rotational speeds of eddies are more skewed toward large values for cyclonic eddies than for anticyclonic eddies As a result, eddies with amplitudes >10 cm and rotational speeds >20 cm s −1 are preferentially cyclonic in the southern hemisphere By contrast, there is a slight preference for anticyclonic eddies for nearly all amplitudes and rotational speeds in the northern hemisphere On average, there is no evidence of anisotropy of these eddies Their average shape is well represented as Gaussian within the central 2/3 of the eddy, but the implied radius of maximum rotational speed is 64% smaller than the observed radius of maximum speed In part because of this mismatch between the radii of maximum axial speed in the observations and the Gaussian approximation, a case is made that a quadratic function that is a very close approximation of the mode profile of the eddy (ie, the most frequently occurring value at each radius) is a better representation of the composite shape of the eddies This would imply that the relative vorticity is nearly constant within the interiors of most eddies, ie, the fluid motion consists approximately of solid-body rotation Perhaps the most significant conclusion of this study is that essentially all of the observed mesoscale features outside of the tropical band 20°S–20°N are nonlinear by the metric U / c , where U is the maximum circum-average geostrophic speed within the eddy interior and c is the translation speed of the eddy A value of U / c  > 1 implies that there is trapped fluid within the eddy interior Many of the extratropical eddies are highly nonlinear, with 48% having U / c  > 5 and 21% having U / c  > 10 Even in the tropics, approximately 90% of the observed mesoscale features are nonlinear by this measure Two other nondimensional parameters also indicate strong degrees of nonlinearity in the tracked eddies The distributions of all three measures of nonlinearity are more skewed toward large values for cyclonic eddies than for anticyclonic eddies in the southern hemisphere extratropics but the opposite is found in the northern hemisphere extratropics There is thus a preference for highly nonlinear extratropical eddies to be cyclonic in the southern hemisphere but anticyclonic in the northern hemisphere Further evidence in support of the interpretation of the observed features as nonlinear eddies is the fact that they propagate nearly due west with small opposing meridional deflections of cyclones and anticyclones (poleward and equatorward, respectively) and with propagation speeds that are nearly equal to the long baroclinic Rossby wave phase speed These characteristics are consistent with theoretical expectations for large, nonlinear eddies While there is no apparent dependence of propagation speed on eddy polarity, the eddy speeds relative to the local long Rossby wave phase speeds are found to be about 20% faster in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere The distributions of the propagation directions of cyclones and anticyclones are essentially the same, except mirrored about a central azimuth angle of about 15° equatorward This small, but we believe statistically significant, equatorward rotation of the central azimuth may be evidence of the effects of ambient currents (meridional advection or the effects of vertical shear on the potential vorticity gradient vector) on the propagation directions of the eddies While the results presented here are persuasive evidence that most of the observed westward-propagating SSH variability consists of isolated nonlinear mesoscale eddies, it is shown that the eddy propagation speeds are about 25% slower than the westward propagation speeds of features in the SSH field that have scales larger than those of the tracked eddies This scale dependence of the propagation speed may be evidence for the existence of dispersion and the presence of features that obey linear Rossby wave dynamics and have larger scales and faster propagation speeds than the nonlinear eddies The amplitudes of these larger-scale signals are evidently smaller than those of the mesoscale eddy field since they are not easily isolated from the energetic nonlinear eddies read more read less

Topics:

Baroclinity (56%)56% related to the paper, Rossby wave (54%)54% related to the paper, Eddy (53%)53% related to the paper, Mesoscale meteorology (53%)53% related to the paper, Geostrophic wind (51%)51% related to the paper
1,377 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0079-6611(88)90053-5
Characteristics, dynamics and significance of marine snow
Alice L. Alldredge1, Mary W. Silver2
01 Jan 1988 - Progress in Oceanography

Abstract:

Macroscopic aggregates of detritus, living organisms and inorganic matter known as marine snow, have significance in the ocean both as unique, partially isolated microenvironments and as transport agents: much of surface-derived matter in the ocean fluxes to the ocean interior and the sea floor as marine snow. As microhabitat... Macroscopic aggregates of detritus, living organisms and inorganic matter known as marine snow, have significance in the ocean both as unique, partially isolated microenvironments and as transport agents: much of surface-derived matter in the ocean fluxes to the ocean interior and the sea floor as marine snow. As microhabitats, marine snow aggregates contain enriched microbial communities and chemical gradients within which processes of photosynthesis, decomposition, and nutrient regeneration occur at highly elevated levels. Microbial communities associated with marine snow undergo complex successional changes on time scales of hours to days which significantly alter the chemical and biological properties of the particles. Marine snow can be produced either de novo by living plants and animals especially as mucus feeding webs of zooplankton, or by the biologically-enhanced physical aggregation of smaller particles. By the latter pathway, microaggregates, phytoplankton, fecal pellets, organic debris and clay-mineral particles collide by differential settlement or physical shear and adhere by the action of various, biologically-generated, organic compounds. Diatom flocculation is a poorly understood source of marine snow of potential global significance. Rates of snow production and breakdown are not known but are critical to predicting flux and to understanding biological community structure and transformations of matter and energy in the water column. The greatest challenge to the study of marine snow at present is the development of appropriate technology to measure abundances and characteristics of aggregates in situ. read more read less

Topics:

Marine snow (70%)70% related to the paper, Snow (62%)62% related to the paper, Phytoplankton (50%)50% related to the paper
1,228 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/S0079-6611(01)00083-0
The monsoon circulation of the Indian Ocean
Friedrich Schott1, Julian P. McCreary2
01 Jan 2001 - Progress in Oceanography

Abstract:

In this paper, we review observations, theory and model results on the monsoon circulation of the Indian Ocean. We begin with a general overview, discussing wind-stress forcing fields and their anomalies, climatological distributions of stratification, mixed-layer depths, altimetric sea-level distributions, and seasonal circu... In this paper, we review observations, theory and model results on the monsoon circulation of the Indian Ocean. We begin with a general overview, discussing wind-stress forcing fields and their anomalies, climatological distributions of stratification, mixed-layer depths, altimetric sea-level distributions, and seasonal circulation patterns (Section 2). The three main monsoon circulation sections deal with the equatorial regime (Section 3), the Somali Current and western Arabian Sea (Section 4), and the Bay of Bengal, seasonally reversing monsoon currents south of India and Sri Lanka, and the eastern and central Arabian Sea (Section 5). For the equatorial regime, we discuss equatorial jets and undercurrents, their interactions with the eastern and western boundaries, and intraseasonal and vertically propagating signals. In the Somali Current section, we describe the ocean's responses to the summer and winter monsoon winds, and outline the modelling efforts that have been carried out to understand them. In the Bay of Bengal section, we present observational and modeling evidence showing the importance of remote forcing from the east, which to a large extent originates along the equator. In the following three sections, we review the southern-hemi sphere subtropical regime and its associated boundary currents (Section 6), the Indonesian Throughflow (Section 7), the Red Sea and Persian Gulf circulations (Section 8), and discuss aspects of their interactions with other Indian-Ocean circulations. Next, we describe the Indian Ocean's deep and shallow meridional overturning cells (Section 9). Model results show large seasonal variability of the meridional overturning streamfunction and heat flux, and we discuss possible physical mechanisms behind this variability. While the monsoon-driven variability of the deep cell is mostly a sloshing motion affecting heat storage, interesting water-mass transformations and monsoonal reversals occur in the shallow cross-equatorial cell. In the mean, the shallow cell connects the subduction areas in the southern subtropics and parts of the Indonesian Throughflow waters with the upwelling areas of the northern hemisphere via the cross-equatorial Somali Current. Its near-surface branch includes a shallow equatorial roll that is seasonally reversing. We close by looking at coupled ocean-climate anomalies, in particular the large events that were observed in the tropical and subtropical Indian Ocean in 1993/94 and 1997/98. These events have been interpreted as an independent Indian-Ocean climate mode by some investigators and as an ENSO-forced anomaly by others. read more read less

Topics:

Monsoon (62%)62% related to the paper, Ocean current (56%)56% related to the paper, Boundary current (55%)55% related to the paper, Upwelling (53%)53% related to the paper, Equator (51%)51% related to the paper
1,210 Citations
Journal Article DOI: 10.1016/0079-6611(88)90049-3
The great salinity anomaly in the northern North Atlantic 1968-1982
Robert R. Dickson1, Jens Meincke2, Svend-Aage Malmberg, Arthur J. Lee3
01 Jan 1988 - Progress in Oceanography

Abstract:

The widespread freshening of the upper 500–800m layer of the northern North Atlantic, which this paper describes, represents one of the most persistent and extreme variations in global ocean climate yet observed in this century. Though a range of explanations have been advanced to explain this event, including in situ chan... The widespread freshening of the upper 500–800m layer of the northern North Atlantic, which this paper describes, represents one of the most persistent and extreme variations in global ocean climate yet observed in this century. Though a range of explanations have been advanced to explain this event, including in situ changes in the surface moisture flux, this paper describes the Great Salinity Anomaly as largely (though not entirely) an advective event, traceable around the Atlantic subpolar gyre for over 14 years from its origins north of Iceland in the mid-to-late 1960s until its return to the Greenland Sea in 1981–1982. The overall propagation speed around this subpolar gyre is estimated at about 3cm s−1. Of the total salt deficit associated with the anomaly as it passed south along the Labrador Coast in 1971–1973 (about 72 × 109 tonnes), a deficit equivalent to about two thirds of this figure (47 × 109 tonnes) ultimately passed through the Faroe-Shetland Channel to the Barents Sea, Arctic Ocean and Greenland Sea during the mid-1970s. Possible effects on deep water formation and on the representativeness of historical section data are discussed. read more read less

Topics:

North Atlantic Deep Water (64%)64% related to the paper, Thermohaline circulation (64%)64% related to the paper, Beaufort Gyre (64%)64% related to the paper, Ocean gyre (61%)61% related to the paper, Arctic (53%)53% related to the paper
1,160 Citations
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Progress in Oceanography format uses elsarticle-num citation style.

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SHERPA/RoMEO Database

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RoMEO Colour Archiving policy
Green Can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF
Blue Can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF
Yellow Can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
White Archiving not formally supported
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  2. Post-prints as being the version of the paper after peer-review, with revisions having been made.

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