scispace - formally typeset

Journal ArticleDOI

Laboratory and Field Evaluation of RAP for Cement Concrete Pavements

01 Jun 2020-Vol. 146, Iss: 2, pp 04020011

Abstract: In the present study, the feasibility of coarse reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) for dry lean concrete (DLC) and pavement quality concrete (PQC) mixes is assessed through laboratory and fie...
Citations
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
Solomon Debbarma1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This paper presents a state-of-the-art review of the utilization of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) aggregates in roller compacted concrete pavement (RCCP) mixes. Owing to the cost-effectiveness and fast-to-construct feature of RCCP, the utilization of RAP in this paving technology seems to be the next best option. In this paper, several issues and factors affecting the fresh and hardened properties of RCCP mixes due to the incorporation of RAP is discussed. Based on this review, it was observed that the type and age of RAP, the concentration of asphalt and agglomerated particles, gradation of RAP, compaction types and efforts, and the RAP replacement levels can significantly affect the strength and durability of RCCP mixes. From a sustainable point of view, most researchers recommended that up to 50% of RAP could be used to partially substitute natural aggregates in RCCP mixes. In a nutshell, the utilization of RAP in RCCP mixes would not only provide economic benefits but would also serve environmental benefits like reduction in the RAP stockpiles and carbon footprints, respectively.

7 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) has been increasingly used in the past few decades as a replacement of natural aggregates in pavement layers. However, low replacement level is employed, and consequently, large quantities of RAP are still left unused. Researchers often neglect foundation pavement layers, but it has higher prospects to consume recycled materials due to their increased thickness. RAP has inferior properties compared to natural aggregates; therefore, cementitious binders are used to produce a (sub)base layer using high volumes of RAP. This paper reviews the use of RAP aggregates with cementitious materials for pavement foundation layers. Special attention is given to the use of alkali-activated materials (AAM) as a binder in substitution for Portland cement (PC). This review discussed the properties of fresh and hardened RAP in cementitious matrices, as well as changes in the microstructure. The biggest challenge on the use of RAP on both systems, RAP-PC and RAP-AAM, is the bond issues caused by the presence of asphalt on the surface of the aggregates. Some researches addressed how physical or chemical pre-treatments to the RAP could improve the adherence to the paste, but few studies focused on the optimisation of the binder. A literature survey indicated that an optimised mix design, durability studies and life cycle assessment (LCA) are important research needs towards the development of RAP-AAM. Despite the lack of research evidence, RAP-AAM is a promising solution for foundation pavement layers.

4 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The use of domestic, industrial and construction waste has been gaining considerable space in recent decades in view of the social and environmental concern in preserving and reusing natural resources. Thus, this article has the premise of studying the use of the mixture of three residues, evaluating the feasibility of using these as a pavement layer. The first residue is the reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) coming from the milling of the asphalt coating of a pavement. The second material used is carbide lime (CL), a residue from the production of acetylene gas that will act as a cementing agent. To react with the carbide lime, a third material was also used: the flat ground glass, since it has a high content of SiO2 in its composition. Thus, it is possible that pozzolanic reactions occur with calcium ions in lime, forming cementing compounds and acquiring properties of strength, durability and rigidity. It was evaluated the variation of the carbide lime (3 and 7%), the dry unit weight (19 and 20 kN/m3) and the ground glass (GG) content passing through the #200 sieve (10, 15 and 25%) in front of the unconfined compression, split tensile, durability and rigidity tests. The results show that the effect of each of the selected variables is considered satisfactory to obtain significant results for each of the tests. The porosity/binder index [η/Biv0.28] proved to be adequate for predicting the mechanical behavior of the mixtures, and it was even possible to make correlations between test results. Furthermore, a generalized approach to replace the laborious durability test is proposed, and limitations are observed.

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
C.R. Marín-Uribe1, R. Navarro-Gaete1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The flexural strength of pavement concrete is generally deduced by testing beams or by applying empirical equations. In this investigation, concrete mixtures were manufactured, incorporating 0, 20, 50 and 100% Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP), by weight, as a replacement for natural aggregates. The compressive strength was measured using cubic specimens and the flexural strength was measured for three types of specimens; beam, semicircular (SCB) and modified beam. This study proposes logarithmic and power equations that allow the estimation of the flexural strength of a concrete mix that incorporates RAP as a function of its compressive strength. Linear or power models are proposed to predict beam flexural strength from SCB specimens and a logarithmic model for modified beam specimens. Statistical analyses show that the proposed prediction models can be considered sufficiently accurate and their use is justified.

1 citations


References
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: A one-dimensional mathematical model was developed, based on the fundamental energy balance, to calculate the pavement near-surface temperatures using hourly measured solar radiation, air temperature, dew-point temperature, and wind velocity data. An analysis was conducted to predict the diurnal temperature effects of pavement thermophysical properties with the aim of seeking an optimum composition of paving materials for future infrastructure projects. Appropriate paving materials not only ensure stability and safety for road users, but also the ability to mitigate heat absorption and high surface temperatures contributing to the Urban Heat Island Effect and human comfort. This paper evaluated the effects and sensitivities of the thermophysical properties on the pavement surface temperatures. The results indicated that both albedo and emissivity have the highest positive effects on pavement maximum and minimum temperatures, respectively, while increasing the thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity help in mitigating the maximum but not the minimum pavement near-surface temperature.

200 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Baoshan Huang1, Xiang Shu1, Guoqiang Li2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) is the removed and/or reprocessed pavement material containing asphalt and aggregate. The use of RAP in asphalt pavement has become a common practice in the construction of new, and reconstruction of old, hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. But little research has been done to examine the potential of incorporating RAP into concrete. Since RAP contains asphalt, it is very likely that the toughness of concrete made with RAP could be improved. In the present study, the mechanical properties of RAP-incorporated Portland cement concrete were investigated through laboratory experiments. Two types of RAP (coarse and fine RAP) materials were considered. The results from this study indicated that RAP could be incorporated into Portland cement concrete without any modification to the conventional equipment or procedures. Without any treatment, there was a systematic reduction in the compressive and split tensile strengths with the incorporation RAP in concrete. Notably, the energy absorbing toughness for the RAP incorporated concrete has been significantly improved.

183 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The recycling of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) helps road authorities to achieve their goal of a sustainable road transport system by reducing waste production and resources consumption. The environmental and economic benefits of using RAP in hot mix asphalt (HMA) applications could be pushed up to the limit, by producing totally recycled HMAs (100% RAP), but the performance of this alternative must be satisfactory. In fact, these mixtures could possibly present problems of workability and durability, higher binder aging and low fatigue cracking resistance. Thus, the objective of this study is to determine if totally recycled HMA mixtures could be a good solution for road paving, by evaluating the merit of some rejuvenator agents (commercial product; used engine oil) in improving the aged binders’ properties and the recycled mixture performance. Several binder samples were prepared with the mentioned rejuvenators and characterized (Pen, R&B and dynamic viscosity), in order to select the best rejuvenator contents. The production temperatures of the corresponding recycled mixtures were evaluated based on their workability. Totally recycled HMAs were produced with the best previously observed combinations, and their performance (water sensitivity, rutting resistance, stiffness, fatigue resistance, binder aging) was assessed. The main conclusion of this study is that totally recycled HMAs can be a good alternative for road paving, especially if rejuvenator agents are used to reduce their production temperature and to improve their performance.

157 citations


01 Jan 2013
Abstract: Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2370, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, D.C., 2013, pp. 17–25. DOI: 10.3141/2370-03 M. Zaumanis and R. B. Mallick, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Road, Worcester, MA 01609. R. Frank, RAP Technologies, LLC, 217 Belhaven Avenue, Linwood, NJ 08221. Corresponding author: M. Zaumanis, jeckabs@gmail.com. thermal cracking failures than mixes with virgin binders. To restore the necessary properties of the aged asphalt, rejuvenating additives can be used. However, to successfully soften the oxidized binder and reach uniform dispersion within the asphalt to ensure required performance properties and longevity of the mixture, an appropriate dosage of a compatible rejuvenator has to be introduced. The application has to be carefully studied to improve the cracking performance without increasing the susceptibility to rutting and ensuring structural stability.

120 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) is the removed and/or reprocessed pavement material containing asphalt and aggregate. The use of RAP in asphalt pavement has become common practice in the constructi...

112 citations