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Journal Article

On allergic rhinitis

01 Sep 1962-Arerugī (Allergy) (Arerugi)-Vol. 11, pp 334
About: This article is published in Arerugī (Allergy).The article was published on 1962-09-01 and is currently open access. It has received 953 citations till now.
Citations
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This systematic review and meta-analyses confirmed the findings of a previous study published in “Rhinitis and Asthma: Causes and Prevention, 2nd Ed.” (2015) as well as new findings of “Mechanisms of Respiratory Disease and Allergology,” which confirmed the role of EMTs in the development of these diseases.
Abstract: Authors Jan L. Brozek, MD, PhD – Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada Jean Bousquet, MD, PhD – Service des Maladies Respiratoires, Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France, INSERM, CESP U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology Team, France, and WHO Collaborating Center for Rhinitis and Asthma Carlos E. Baena-Cagnani, MD – Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina Sergio Bonini, MD – Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine – CNR, Rome, Italy and Department of Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy G. Walter Canonica, MD – Allergy & Respiratory Diseases, DIMI, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Thomas B. Casale, MD – Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, USA Roy Gerth van Wijk, MD, PhD – Section of Allergology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Ken Ohta, MD, PhD – Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Torsten Zuberbier, MD – Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany Holger J. Schunemann, MD, PhD, MSc – Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

3,368 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: These are the most recent and currently the most systematically and transparently developed recommendations about the treatment of allergic rhinitis in adults and children and patients are encouraged to use these recommendations in their daily practice and to support their decisions.
Abstract: Background: Allergic rhinitis represents a global health problem affecting 10% to 20% of the population. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines have been widely used to treat the approximately 500 million affected patients globally. Objective: To develop explicit, unambiguous, and transparent clinical recommendations systematically for treatment of allergic rhinitis on the basis of current best evidence. Methods: The authors updated ARIA clinical recommendations in collaboration with Global Allergy and Asthma European Network following the approach suggested by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation working group. Results: This article presents recommendations about the prevention of allergic diseases, the use of oral and topical medications, allergen specific immunotherapy, and complementary treatments in patients with allergic rhinitis as well as patients with both allergic rhinitis and asthma. The guideline panel developed evidence profiles for each recommendation and considered health benefits and harms, burden, patient preferences, and resource use, when appropriate, to formulate recommendations for patients, clinicians, and other health care professionals. Conclusion: These are the most recent and currently the most systematically and transparently developed recommendations about the treatment of allergic rhinitis in adults and children. Patients, clinicians, and policy makers are encouraged to use these recommendations in their daily practice and to support their decisions.

1,398 citations


Cites background from "On allergic rhinitis"

  • ...There are many different causes of rhinitis in children and approximately 50% are induced by allergy (2170)....

    [...]

  • ...The principles of treatment are the same in children as in adults, but special care has to be taken to avoid the side effects which are unique to this age group (59, 2170, 2205)....

    [...]

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This document incorporated the efforts of many participants, and no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters.
Abstract: These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "The diagnosis and Management of Rhinitis: An Updated Practice Parameter." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion.

991 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
University of Utah1, University of Colorado Boulder2, Stanford University3, Oregon Health & Science University4, University of Chicago5, Rush University Medical Center6, University of Barcelona7, Harvard University8, Vanderbilt University9, University of Arizona10, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston11, University of Pennsylvania12, Emory University13, Université de Montréal14, Samsung Medical Center15, University of Auckland16, University of Pittsburgh17, University of Amsterdam18, University of Ioannina19, University of California, San Francisco20, Eastern Virginia Medical School21, University of New South Wales22, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven23, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust24, University of Lorraine25, University of British Columbia26, Northwestern University27, Georgia Regents University28, Johns Hopkins University29, New York University30, Korea University31, University of Texas at Austin32, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences33, Jikei University School of Medicine34, University of Washington35, University of Siena36, Medical College of Wisconsin37, University of Adelaide38, West Virginia University39, Innsbruck Medical University40, Pusan National University41, University of Calgary42, Medical University of South Carolina43, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill44, Cleveland Clinic45, Loyola University Chicago46, Cornell University47, Temple University48, University of São Paulo49, National University of Singapore50, San Antonio Military Medical Center51, University of Alabama at Birmingham52, University of Alberta53, Capital Medical University54
TL;DR: This dissertation aims to provide a history of Chinese medical practice in the United States from 1989 to 2002, a period chosen in order to explore its roots as well as specific cases up to and including the year in which descriptions of “modern China” began to circulate.
Abstract: Background The body of knowledge regarding rhinosinusitis(RS) continues to expand, with rapid growth in number of publications, yet substantial variability in the quality of those presentations. In an effort to both consolidate and critically appraise this information, rhinologic experts from around the world have produced the International Consensus Statement on Allergy and Rhinology: Rhinosinusitis (ICAR:RS). Methods Evidence-based reviews with recommendations(EBRRs) were developed for scores of topics, using previously reported methodology. Where existing evidence was insufficient for an EBRR, an evidence-based review (EBR)was produced. The sections were then synthesized and the entire manuscript was then reviewed by all authors for consensus. Results The resulting ICAR:RS document addresses multiple topics in RS, including acute RS (ARS), chronic RS (CRS)with and without nasal polyps (CRSwNP and CRSsNP), recurrent acute RS (RARS), acute exacerbation of CRS (AECRS), and pediatric RS. Conclusion As a critical review of the RS literature, ICAR:RS provides a thorough review of pathophysiology and evidence-based recommendations for medical and surgical treatment. It also demonstrates the significant gaps in our understanding of the pathophysiology and optimal management of RS. Too often the foundation upon which these recommendations are based is comprised of lower level evidence. It is our hope that this summary of the evidence in RS will point out where additional research efforts may be directed.

645 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 2000-Allergy
TL;DR: Current guidelines emphasize the importance of an accurate diagnosis of patients presenting with rhinitis symptoms and the morbidity of SAR obviously depends on the geographic region, the pollen season of the plants, and the local climate.
Abstract: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a high-prevalence disease in many developed countries, affecting about 10±20% of the general population (1±5). Several studies based on questionnaire and objective testing or medical examination indicate an increasing prevalence of AR in European countries over the last decades (6, 7). AR is characterized by nasal itching, sneezing, watery rhinorrhoea, and nasal obstruction. Additional symptoms such as headache, impaired smell, and conjunctival symptoms can be associated. According to the time of exposure, AR can be subdivided into perennial, seasonal, and occupational disease. Perennial AR (PAR) is most frequently caused by dust mites and animal dander. Seasonal AR (SAR) is related to a wide variety of pollen allergens including grasses, Parietaria, Ambrosia, Artemisia, birch, olive, hazelnut, and cypress. The morbidity of SAR obviously depends on the geographic region, the pollen season of the plants, and the local climate. Several other conditions can cause similar symptoms and are referred to as nonallergic (noninfectious) rhinitis: NARES (nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome); aspirin sensitivity; endocrine, occupational, postinfectious, and side-effects of systemic drugs; abuse of topical decongestants (rhinitis medicamentosa); and idiopathic rhinitis. Furthermore, diseases such as nasal polyposis, chronic sinusitis, cystic ®brosis, Wegener's disease, benign or malignant tumours, etc. have to be excluded carefully. Therefore, current guidelines (4) emphasize the importance of an accurate diagnosis of patients presenting with rhinitis symptoms. In fact, several causes may commonly coexist in the same *European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology. Allergy 2000: 55: 116±134 Printed in UK. All rights reserved Copyright # Munksgaard 2000

625 citations

References
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This systematic review and meta-analyses confirmed the findings of a previous study published in “Rhinitis and Asthma: Causes and Prevention, 2nd Ed.” (2015) as well as new findings of “Mechanisms of Respiratory Disease and Allergology,” which confirmed the role of EMTs in the development of these diseases.
Abstract: Authors Jan L. Brozek, MD, PhD – Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada Jean Bousquet, MD, PhD – Service des Maladies Respiratoires, Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France, INSERM, CESP U1018, Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology Team, France, and WHO Collaborating Center for Rhinitis and Asthma Carlos E. Baena-Cagnani, MD – Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina Sergio Bonini, MD – Institute of Neurobiology and Molecular Medicine – CNR, Rome, Italy and Department of Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy G. Walter Canonica, MD – Allergy & Respiratory Diseases, DIMI, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy Thomas B. Casale, MD – Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, USA Roy Gerth van Wijk, MD, PhD – Section of Allergology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands Ken Ohta, MD, PhD – Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Torsten Zuberbier, MD – Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany Holger J. Schunemann, MD, PhD, MSc – Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

3,368 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: These are the most recent and currently the most systematically and transparently developed recommendations about the treatment of allergic rhinitis in adults and children and patients are encouraged to use these recommendations in their daily practice and to support their decisions.
Abstract: Background: Allergic rhinitis represents a global health problem affecting 10% to 20% of the population. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines have been widely used to treat the approximately 500 million affected patients globally. Objective: To develop explicit, unambiguous, and transparent clinical recommendations systematically for treatment of allergic rhinitis on the basis of current best evidence. Methods: The authors updated ARIA clinical recommendations in collaboration with Global Allergy and Asthma European Network following the approach suggested by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation working group. Results: This article presents recommendations about the prevention of allergic diseases, the use of oral and topical medications, allergen specific immunotherapy, and complementary treatments in patients with allergic rhinitis as well as patients with both allergic rhinitis and asthma. The guideline panel developed evidence profiles for each recommendation and considered health benefits and harms, burden, patient preferences, and resource use, when appropriate, to formulate recommendations for patients, clinicians, and other health care professionals. Conclusion: These are the most recent and currently the most systematically and transparently developed recommendations about the treatment of allergic rhinitis in adults and children. Patients, clinicians, and policy makers are encouraged to use these recommendations in their daily practice and to support their decisions.

1,398 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This document incorporated the efforts of many participants, and no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters.
Abstract: These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "The diagnosis and Management of Rhinitis: An Updated Practice Parameter." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion.

991 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
University of Utah1, University of Colorado Boulder2, Stanford University3, Oregon Health & Science University4, University of Chicago5, Rush University Medical Center6, University of Barcelona7, Harvard University8, Vanderbilt University9, University of Arizona10, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston11, University of Pennsylvania12, Emory University13, Université de Montréal14, Samsung Medical Center15, University of Auckland16, University of Pittsburgh17, University of Amsterdam18, University of Ioannina19, University of California, San Francisco20, Eastern Virginia Medical School21, University of New South Wales22, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven23, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust24, University of Lorraine25, University of British Columbia26, Northwestern University27, Georgia Regents University28, Johns Hopkins University29, New York University30, Korea University31, University of Texas at Austin32, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences33, Jikei University School of Medicine34, University of Washington35, University of Siena36, Medical College of Wisconsin37, University of Adelaide38, West Virginia University39, Innsbruck Medical University40, Pusan National University41, University of Calgary42, Medical University of South Carolina43, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill44, Cleveland Clinic45, Loyola University Chicago46, Cornell University47, Temple University48, University of São Paulo49, National University of Singapore50, San Antonio Military Medical Center51, University of Alabama at Birmingham52, University of Alberta53, Capital Medical University54
TL;DR: This dissertation aims to provide a history of Chinese medical practice in the United States from 1989 to 2002, a period chosen in order to explore its roots as well as specific cases up to and including the year in which descriptions of “modern China” began to circulate.
Abstract: Background The body of knowledge regarding rhinosinusitis(RS) continues to expand, with rapid growth in number of publications, yet substantial variability in the quality of those presentations. In an effort to both consolidate and critically appraise this information, rhinologic experts from around the world have produced the International Consensus Statement on Allergy and Rhinology: Rhinosinusitis (ICAR:RS). Methods Evidence-based reviews with recommendations(EBRRs) were developed for scores of topics, using previously reported methodology. Where existing evidence was insufficient for an EBRR, an evidence-based review (EBR)was produced. The sections were then synthesized and the entire manuscript was then reviewed by all authors for consensus. Results The resulting ICAR:RS document addresses multiple topics in RS, including acute RS (ARS), chronic RS (CRS)with and without nasal polyps (CRSwNP and CRSsNP), recurrent acute RS (RARS), acute exacerbation of CRS (AECRS), and pediatric RS. Conclusion As a critical review of the RS literature, ICAR:RS provides a thorough review of pathophysiology and evidence-based recommendations for medical and surgical treatment. It also demonstrates the significant gaps in our understanding of the pathophysiology and optimal management of RS. Too often the foundation upon which these recommendations are based is comprised of lower level evidence. It is our hope that this summary of the evidence in RS will point out where additional research efforts may be directed.

645 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 2000-Allergy
TL;DR: Current guidelines emphasize the importance of an accurate diagnosis of patients presenting with rhinitis symptoms and the morbidity of SAR obviously depends on the geographic region, the pollen season of the plants, and the local climate.
Abstract: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a high-prevalence disease in many developed countries, affecting about 10±20% of the general population (1±5). Several studies based on questionnaire and objective testing or medical examination indicate an increasing prevalence of AR in European countries over the last decades (6, 7). AR is characterized by nasal itching, sneezing, watery rhinorrhoea, and nasal obstruction. Additional symptoms such as headache, impaired smell, and conjunctival symptoms can be associated. According to the time of exposure, AR can be subdivided into perennial, seasonal, and occupational disease. Perennial AR (PAR) is most frequently caused by dust mites and animal dander. Seasonal AR (SAR) is related to a wide variety of pollen allergens including grasses, Parietaria, Ambrosia, Artemisia, birch, olive, hazelnut, and cypress. The morbidity of SAR obviously depends on the geographic region, the pollen season of the plants, and the local climate. Several other conditions can cause similar symptoms and are referred to as nonallergic (noninfectious) rhinitis: NARES (nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome); aspirin sensitivity; endocrine, occupational, postinfectious, and side-effects of systemic drugs; abuse of topical decongestants (rhinitis medicamentosa); and idiopathic rhinitis. Furthermore, diseases such as nasal polyposis, chronic sinusitis, cystic ®brosis, Wegener's disease, benign or malignant tumours, etc. have to be excluded carefully. Therefore, current guidelines (4) emphasize the importance of an accurate diagnosis of patients presenting with rhinitis symptoms. In fact, several causes may commonly coexist in the same *European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology. Allergy 2000: 55: 116±134 Printed in UK. All rights reserved Copyright # Munksgaard 2000

625 citations