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Institution

University of Auckland

EducationAuckland, New Zealand
About: University of Auckland is a education organization based out in Auckland, New Zealand. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Population & Poison control. The organization has 28049 authors who have published 77706 publications receiving 2689366 citations. The organization is also known as: The University of Auckland & Auckland University College.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Thematic analysis is a poorly demarcated, rarely acknowledged, yet widely used qualitative analytic method within psychology as mentioned in this paper, and it offers an accessible and theoretically flexible approach to analysing qualitative data.
Abstract: Thematic analysis is a poorly demarcated, rarely acknowledged, yet widely used qualitative analytic method within psychology. In this paper, we argue that it offers an accessible and theoretically flexible approach to analysing qualitative data. We outline what thematic analysis is, locating it in relation to other qualitative analytic methods that search for themes or patterns, and in relation to different epistemological and ontological positions. We then provide clear guidelines to those wanting to start thematic analysis, or conduct it in a more deliberate and rigorous way, and consider potential pitfalls in conducting thematic analysis. Finally, we outline the disadvantages and advantages of thematic analysis. We conclude by advocating thematic analysis as a useful and flexible method for qualitative research in and beyond psychology.

103,789 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a non-parametric method for multivariate analysis of variance, based on sums of squared distances, is proposed. But it is not suitable for most ecological multivariate data sets.
Abstract: Hypothesis-testing methods for multivariate data are needed to make rigorous probability statements about the effects of factors and their interactions in experiments. Analysis of variance is particularly powerful for the analysis of univariate data. The traditional multivariate analogues, however, are too stringent in their assumptions for most ecological multivariate data sets. Non-parametric methods, based on permutation tests, are preferable. This paper describes a new non-parametric method for multivariate analysis of variance, after McArdle and Anderson (in press). It is given here, with several applications in ecology, to provide an alternative and perhaps more intuitive formulation for ANOVA (based on sums of squared distances) to complement the description pro- vided by McArdle and Anderson (in press) for the analysis of any linear model. It is an improvement on previous non-parametric methods because it allows a direct additive partitioning of variation for complex models. It does this while maintaining the flexibility and lack of formal assumptions of other non-parametric methods. The test- statistic is a multivariate analogue to Fisher's F-ratio and is calculated directly from any symmetric distance or dissimilarity matrix. P-values are then obtained using permutations. Some examples of the method are given for tests involving several factors, including factorial and hierarchical (nested) designs and tests of interactions.

12,328 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: BEAST is a fast, flexible software architecture for Bayesian analysis of molecular sequences related by an evolutionary tree that provides models for DNA and protein sequence evolution, highly parametric coalescent analysis, relaxed clock phylogenetics, non-contemporaneous sequence data, statistical alignment and a wide range of options for prior distributions.
Abstract: The evolutionary analysis of molecular sequence variation is a statistical enterprise. This is reflected in the increased use of probabilistic models for phylogenetic inference, multiple sequence alignment, and molecular population genetics. Here we present BEAST: a fast, flexible software architecture for Bayesian analysis of molecular sequences related by an evolutionary tree. A large number of popular stochastic models of sequence evolution are provided and tree-based models suitable for both within- and between-species sequence data are implemented. BEAST version 1.4.6 consists of 81000 lines of Java source code, 779 classes and 81 packages. It provides models for DNA and protein sequence evolution, highly parametric coalescent analysis, relaxed clock phylogenetics, non-contemporaneous sequence data, statistical alignment and a wide range of options for prior distributions. BEAST source code is object-oriented, modular in design and freely available at http://beast-mcmc.googlecode.com/ under the GNU LGPL license. BEAST is a powerful and flexible evolutionary analysis package for molecular sequence variation. It also provides a resource for the further development of new models and statistical methods of evolutionary analysis.

11,916 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Rafael Lozano1, Mohsen Naghavi1, Kyle J Foreman2, Stephen S Lim1  +192 moreInstitutions (95)
TL;DR: The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 aimed to estimate annual deaths for the world and 21 regions between 1980 and 2010 for 235 causes, with uncertainty intervals (UIs), separately by age and sex, using the Cause of Death Ensemble model.

11,809 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss their experience designing and implementing a statistical computing language, which combines what they felt were useful features from two existing computer languages, and they feel that the new language provides advantages in the areas of portability, computational efficiency, memory management, and scope.
Abstract: In this article we discuss our experience designing and implementing a statistical computing language. In developing this new language, we sought to combine what we felt were useful features from two existing computer languages. We feel that the new language provides advantages in the areas of portability, computational efficiency, memory management, and scoping.

9,446 citations


Authors

Showing all 28484 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Walter C. Willett3342399413322
Meir J. Stampfer2771414283776
Frank E. Speizer193636135891
Bernard Rosner1901162147661
Eric Boerwinkle1831321170971
Rory Collins162489193407
Monique M.B. Breteler15954693762
Charles H. Hennekens150424117806
Rajesh Kumar1494439140830
Hugh A. Sampson14781676492
David P. Strachan143472105256
Jun Lu135152699767
Peter Zoller13473476093
David H. Barlow13378672730
Henry T. Lynch13392586270
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
2023162
2022613
20215,468
20205,198
20194,754
20184,389