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Journal ArticleDOI

Rediscovering the social group: A self-categorization theory.

01 Jul 1989-Contemporary Sociology (Basil Blackwell)-Vol. 18, Iss: 4, pp 645

Abstract: 1. Introducing the Problem: Individual and Group 2. Rediscovering the Social Group 3. A Self-Categorization Theory 4. The Analysis of Social Influence 5. Social Identity 6. The Salience of Social Categories 7. Social Identity and Group Polarization 8. Crowd Behaviour as Social Action 9. Conclusion.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Daniel J. McAllister1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This study addressed the nature and functioning of relationships of interpersonal trust among managers and professionals in organizations, the factors influencing trust's development, and the implications of trust for behavior and performance Theoretical foundations were drawn from the sociological literature on trust and the social-psychological literature on trust in close relationships An initial test of the proposed theoretical framework was conducted in a field setting with 194 managers and professionals

5,981 citations


Cites background from "Rediscovering the social group: A s..."

  • ...More fundamentally, self-categorization theorists have observed that individuals tend to group themselves with others on the basis of objective attributes such as race, age, and gender (Turner, 1987) and that such internal classifications influence beliefs and attitudes....

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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Mfost of social psychology's theories of the self fail to take into account the significance of social identification in the definition of self. Social identities are self-definitions that are more inclusive than the individuated self-concept of most American psychology. A model of optimal distinctiveness is proposed in which social identity is viewed as a reconciliation of opposing needs for assimilation and differentiation from others. According to this model, individuals avoid self-construals that are either too personalized or too inclusive and instead define themselves in terms of distinctive category memberships. Social identity and group loyalty are hypothesized to be strongest for those self-categorizations that simultaneously provide for a sense of belonging and a sense of distinctiveness. Results from an initial laboratory experiment support the prediction that depersonalization and group size interact as determinants of the strength of social identification.

3,973 citations


Book
30 Dec 2002-
TL;DR: Mother Nature knows best--How engineered organizations of the future will resemble natural-born systems.
Abstract: Mother Nature knows best--How engineered organizations of the future will resemble natural-born systems.

3,557 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Michael A. Hogg1, Deborah I. Terry1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Although aspects of social identity theory are familiar to organizational psychologists, its elaboration, through self-categorization theory, of how social categorization and prototype-based depersonalization actually produce social identity effects is less well known. We describe these processes, relate self-categorization theory to social identity theory, describe new theoretical developments in detail, and show how these developments can address a range of organizational phenomena. We discuss cohesion and deviance, leadership, subgroup and sociodemographic structure, and mergers and acquisitions.

3,232 citations


Cites background from "Rediscovering the social group: A s..."

  • ...At about the same time, Turner and his colleagues (Turner, 1985; Turner et al., 1987) extended social identity theory through the development of selfcategorization theory, which specified in detail how social categorization produces prototypebased depersonalization of self and others and, thus, generates social identity phenomena....

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  • ...…developments, see books by Abrams and Hogg (1990, 1999); Hogg and Abrams (1988); Hogg and Terry (in press); Oakes, Haslam, and Turner (1994); Robinson (1996); Spears, Oakes, Ellemers, and Haslam (1997); Terry and Hogg (1999); Turner et al. (1987); and Worchel, Morales, Pdez, and Deschamps (1998)....

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  • ...At about the same time, Turner and his colleagues (Turner, 1985; Turner et al., 1987) extended social identity theory through the development of selfcategorization theory, which specified in detail how social categorization produces prototypebased depersonalization of self and others and, thus,…...

    [...]


Journal ArticleDOI
Jan E. Stets1, Peter Burke1Institutions (1)
Abstract: In social psychology, we need to establish a general theory of the self which can attend to both macro and micro processes, and which avoids the redundancies of separate theories on different aspects of the self For this purpose, we present core components of identity theory and social identity theory and argue that although differences exist between the two theories, they are more differences in emphasis than in kind, and that linking the two theories can establish a more fully integrated view of the self The core components we examine include the different bases of identity (category/group or role) in each of the theories, identity salience and the activation of identities as discussed in the theories, and the cognitive and motivational processes that emerge from identities based on category/group and on role. By examining the self through the lens of both identity theory and social identity theory, we see how, in combination, they can move us toward a general theory of the self In contrast to Hogg and his colleagues (Hogg, Terry, and White 1995), we see substantial similarities and overlap between social identity theory and identity theory. We think that this overlap ultimately will cause these theories to be linked in fundamental ways, though we do not think that time has

2,967 citations


Cites background from "Rediscovering the social group: A s..."

  • ..." The levels are floating and contextual, and depend on the salience of the different classifications (Turner et al. 1987)....

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  • ...In regard to the motivational underpinnings of an identity, social identity theory holds that when a group identity is activated, people behave so as to enhance the evaluation of the in-group relative to the out-group and thereby to enhance their own self-evaluation as group members (Turner et al. 1987)....

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  • ...centrism (Turner et al. 1987)....

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  • ...Depersonalization is the basic process underlying group phenomena such as social stereotyping, group cohesiveness, ethnocentrism, cooperation and altruism, emotional contagion, and collective action (Turner et al. 1987)....

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  • ...1995) rather than as a unique individual (Turner et al. 1987)....

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