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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1089/JOP.2020.0085

Safety and Tolerability of an Eye Drop Based on 0.6% Povidone-Iodine Nanoemulsion in Dry Eye Patients.

04 Mar 2021-Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers 140 Huguenot Street, 3rd Floor New Rochelle, NY 10801 USA)-Vol. 37, Iss: 2, pp 90-96
Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate safety and tolerability on the ocular surface of an anti-septic formulation containing 0.6% povidone–iodine (0.6% PVI) for a 4 week period. Methods: An observational, prospecti...

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Topics: Tolerability (53%), Eye drop (52%)
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5 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/PHARMACEUTICS13050678
09 May 2021-Pharmaceutics
Abstract: Effective drug delivery to intraocular tissues remains a great challenge due to complex anatomical and physiological barriers that selectively limit the entry of drugs into the eye. To overcome these challenges, frequent topical application and regular intravitreal injections are currently used to achieve the desired drug concentrations into the eye. However, the repetitive installation or recurrent injections may result in several side effects. Recent advancements in the field of nanoparticle-based drug delivery have demonstrated promising results for topical ophthalmic nanotherapies in the treatment of intraocular diseases. Studies have revealed that nanocarriers enhance the intraocular half-life and bioavailability of several therapies including proteins, peptides and genetic material. Amongst the array of nanoparticles available nowadays, lipid-based nanosystems have shown an increased efficiency and feasibility in topical formulations, making them an important target for constant and thorough research in both preclinical and clinical practice. In this review, we will cover the promising lipid-based nanocarriers used in topical ophthalmic formulations for intraocular drug delivery.

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Topics: Nanocarriers (57%), Drug delivery (56%)

4 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.12659/AJCR.928748
Abstract: BACKGROUND Peripheral ulcerative keratitis is one of the ocular complications associated with chronic inflammatory immune-mediated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, in which inflammatory reactions and infections can be recurrent. Suspected infections are treated with topical antibiotics that, in some cases, may promote selection of resistant microbes. Povidone iodine is known for its rapid broad-spectrum activity against all kinds of microbes and biofilms, lack of microbial resistance, ability to counteract excessive inflammation, and efficacy in wound healing, along with an optimum safety and tolerability profile. The purpose of this case report is to show the resolution of a peripheral ulcerative keratitis case by means of treatment with 0.66% povidone iodine. CASE REPORT An 89-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, 1 eye, and a superior descemetic corneal ulcer was treated with amniotic membrane, topical antibiotics, and antiviral drugs without any control of clinical signs and symptoms. Therefore, all anti-infective treatments were replaced with 0.66% povidone iodine (3 times/day) given alone for 5 weeks and then associated with serum eyedrops. When a clear regression of the ulcer was observed, the patient was maintained with serum eyedrops only. CONCLUSIONS Unusual treatment with povidone iodine 0.66% (used for the first time in an autoimmune patient), alone and in association with serum eyedrops, probably contributed to alleviate the signs and symptoms of a case of peripheral ulcerative keratitis not responding to conventional treatments. Although its regular use warrants further investigation, povidone iodine seems a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of corneal ulcers associated with chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

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Topics: corneal ulcer (57%), Arthritis (52%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1155/2021/2873543
Dalan Jing1, Aihua Deng2, Hongmei Wang1, Yilin Chou1  +4 moreInstitutions (2)
Abstract: Purpose To comparatively evaluate the safety and satisfaction of bandage contact lens (BCL) and eye patching in patients after cataract surgery. Methods Sixteen (32 eyes) patients who planned to undergo bilateral cataract surgery were recruited. The two eyes of each patient were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group A and Group B were instructed to wear BCLs immediately at the end of the surgery until one week and eye patch immediately after surgery until one day, respectively. Visual analog scales of ten specific symptoms, Visual Function Index (VF-14) questionnaire, and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were conducted on the first day before the surgery and Day 1 and Day 7 after surgery. Oculus keratography was conducted on the first day before surgery and on Day 7. Patient satisfaction was determined on Day 1. Moreover, bacterial species in the conjunctival sac, meibomian gland secretions, and BCLs were subsequently identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results The patient satisfaction scores of Group A were higher than Group B. Group A were more motivated to choose the same treatment and were more likely to recommend BCLs to others. No statistically significant differences were found in bacterial culture positivity between the groups. The differences in ocular signs and symptoms between the two groups were not statistically significant. There were no significant differences in the BCVA and VF-14 between the groups at any time point. Conclusions BCLs could be safely and effectively used in patients after cataract surgery.

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Topics: Cataract surgery (59%), Visual acuity (50%)

1 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1155/2021/1370002
Abstract: Purpose. To investigate the short-term effects on tear film parameters and ocular symptoms of a novel eye mask producing heat and vibration developed for the treatment of dry eye disease owing to meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). Methods. This is a pilot study including the first 20 consecutive patients (6 males, 14 females; mean age 52.4 ± 16.8 years) who were treated with a novel eye mask producing heat (42°) and vibration (up to 20 Hz) (Activa, SBS Sistemi, Turin, Italy) for 15 minutes. The treatment incorporates 2 phases in the following chronological order: 5 minutes of heating (phase I); 10 minutes of combination of heating and vibration (phase II). Noninvasive ocular surface examination was carried out before (T0) and 30 minutes after the mask session (T1) by means of Idra (SBS Sistemi, Turin, Italy) for the measurement of noninvasive break-up time (NIBUT) and lipid layer thickness (LLT). Patients’ satisfaction after treatment was ascertained by asking the patients whether they perceived improvement from their baseline symptoms according to a 5-grade scale: none = 0; trace = 1; mild = 2; moderate = 3; high = 4. Results. All patients completed regularly the mask session and no device-related adverse events were noted. NIBUT improved significantly from T0 to T1 (from 7.2 ± 1.8 s to 8.1 ± 2.1; = 0.014). In parallel, also LLT improved from from T0 to T1 (72.5 ± 13.9 nm to 83.1 ± 16.1; = 0.016). Seven patients (35% of the total) had a moderate satisfaction (grade 3) while 13 patients (65%) had a high satisfaction (grade 4) with treatment. Conclusions. This eye mask represents a novel well tolerated tool in the armamentarium of MGD treatments. Thirty minutes after the session, NIBUT and LLT increased significantly; furthermore, all patients reported an improvement of discomfort symptoms with a moderate to high satisfaction with treatment.

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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.3390/APP112110269
01 Nov 2021-Applied Sciences
Abstract: Background: To study the safety and efficacy provided by a minimal and localized anesthesia in cataract surgery. Methods: Randomized controlled trial. A total of 100 patients undergoing cataract surgery were randomly divided into two groups of 50, which respecitvely received conventional topical anesthesia consisting of preservative-free Oxibuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% drops or minimal localized anesthesia, administered with a cotton bud soaked in preservative-free Oxibuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% applied to clear cornea on the access sites for 10 s immediately before surgery. The mean outcome measures were intraoperative pain and the incidence of postoperative ocular discomfort. Results: All patients tolerated well the procedure, giving patin scores between 1–3. Fifteen patients (30%) of group 1 and ten of group 2 (25%) required supplemental anesthesia. No intraoperative complications were recorded. No eyes had epithelial defects at the end of the surgery or at postoperative check-ups. Conclusions: Minimal anesthesia in cataract surgery resulted quick, safe and non-invasive.

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Topics: Cataract surgery (60%)
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67 results found


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.CELL.2014.03.011
Yasmine Belkaid1, Timothy W. Hand1Institutions (1)
27 Mar 2014-Cell
Abstract: The microbiota plays a fundamental role on the induction, training, and function of the host immune system. In return, the immune system has largely evolved as a means to maintain the symbiotic relationship of the host with these highly diverse and evolving microbes. When operating optimally, this immune system-microbiota alliance allows the induction of protective responses to pathogens and the maintenance of regulatory pathways involved in the maintenance of tolerance to innocuous antigens. However, in high-income countries, overuse of antibiotics, changes in diet, and elimination of constitutive partners, such as nematodes, may have selected for a microbiota that lack the resilience and diversity required to establish balanced immune responses. This phenomenon is proposed to account for some of the dramatic rise in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders in parts of the world where our symbiotic relationship with the microbiota has been the most affected.

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Topics: Immune system (50%)

2,335 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1001/ARCHOPHT.118.5.615
Abstract: Objective To evaluate the validity and reliability of the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire. Methods Participants (109 patients with dry eye and 30 normal controls) completed the OSDI, the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25), the McMonnies Dry Eye Questionnaire, the Short Form-12 (SF-12) Health Status Questionnaire, and an ophthalmic examination including Schirmer tests, tear breakup time, and fluorescein and lissamine green staining. Results Factor analysis identified 3 subscales of the OSDI: vision-related function, ocular symptoms, and environmental triggers. Reliability (measured by Cronbach α) ranged from good to excellent for the overall instrument and each subscale, and test-retest reliability was good to excellent. The OSDI was valid, effectively discriminating between normal, mild to moderate, and severe dry eye disease as defined by both physician's assessment and a composite disease severity score. The OSDI also correlated significantly with the McMonnies questionnaire, the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire, the physical component summary score of the Short Form-12, patient perception of symptoms, and artificial tear usage. Conclusions The OSDI is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring the severity of dry eye disease, and it possesses the necessary psychometric properties to be used as an end point in clinical trials.

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1,822 Citations



Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JTOS.2017.05.008
01 Jul 2017-Ocular Surface
Abstract: The goals of the TFOS DEWS II Definition and Classification Subcommittee were to create an evidence-based definition and a contemporary classification system for dry eye disease (DED). The new definition recognizes the multifactorial nature of dry eye as a disease where loss of homeostasis of the tear film is the central pathophysiological concept. Ocular symptoms, as a broader term that encompasses reports of discomfort or visual disturbance, feature in the definition and the key etiologies of tear film instability, hyperosmolarity, and ocular surface inflammation and damage were determined to be important for inclusion in the definition. In the light of new data, neurosensory abnormalities were also included in the definition for the first time. In the classification of DED, recent evidence supports a scheme based on the pathophysiology where aqueous deficient and evaporative dry eye exist as a continuum, such that elements of each are considered in diagnosis and management. Central to the scheme is a positive diagnosis of DED with signs and symptoms, and this is directed towards management to restore homeostasis. The scheme also allows consideration of various related manifestations, such as non-obvious disease involving ocular surface signs without related symptoms, including neurotrophic conditions where dysfunctional sensation exists, and cases where symptoms exist without demonstrable ocular surface signs, including neuropathic pain. This approach is not intended to override clinical assessment and judgment but should prove helpful in guiding clinical management and research.

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990 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NI.2608
01 Jul 2013-Nature Immunology
Abstract: A dense resident microbial community in the gut, referred as the commensal microbiota, coevolved with the host and is essential for many host physiological processes that include enhancement of the intestinal epithelial barrier, development of the immune system and acquisition of nutrients. A major function of the microbiota is protection against colonization by pathogens and overgrowth of indigenous pathobionts that can result from the disruption of the healthy microbial community. The mechanisms that regulate the ability of the microbiota to restrain pathogen growth are complex and include competitive metabolic interactions, localization to intestinal niches and induction of host immune responses. Pathogens, in turn, have evolved strategies to escape from commensal-mediated resistance to colonization. Thus, the interplay between commensals and pathogens or indigenous pathobionts is critical for controlling infection and disease. Understanding pathogen-commensal interactions may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treating infectious diseases.

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Topics: Colonisation resistance (59%), Gut flora (53%)

955 Citations


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