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Stefaan De Wolf

Bio: Stefaan De Wolf is an academic researcher from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The author has contributed to research in topics: Silicon & Crystalline silicon. The author has an hindex of 59, co-authored 187 publications receiving 12990 citations. Previous affiliations of Stefaan De Wolf include École Normale Supérieure & École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using highly sensitive photothermal deflection and photocurrent spectroscopy, the absorption spectrum of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films at room temperature is measured, finding a high absorption coefficient with particularly sharp onset and a compositional change of the material.
Abstract: Solar cells based on organometallic halide perovskite absorber layers are emerging as a high-performance photovoltaic technology. Using highly sensitive photothermal deflection and photocurrent spectroscopy, we measure the absorption spectrum of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite thin films at room temperature. We find a high absorption coefficient with particularly sharp onset. Below the bandgap, the absorption is exponential over more than four decades with an Urbach energy as small as 15 meV, which suggests a well-ordered microstructure. No deep states are found down to the detection limit of ∼1 cm–1. These results confirm the excellent electronic properties of perovskite thin films, enabling the very high open-circuit voltages reported for perovskite solar cells. Following intentional moisture ingress, we find that the absorption at photon energies below 2.4 eV is strongly reduced, pointing to a compositional change of the material.

2,099 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Mar 2012
TL;DR: Silicon heterojunction solar cells as mentioned in this paper consist of thin amorphous silicon layers deposited on crystalline silicon wafers, which enables energy conversion efficiencies above 20% at the industrial production level.
Abstract: Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of thin amorphous silicon layers deposited on crystalline silicon wafers. This design enables energy conversion efficiencies above 20% at the industrial production level. The key feature of this technology is that the metal contacts, which are highly recombination active in traditional, diffused-junction cells, are electronically separated from the absorber by insertion of a wider bandgap layer. This enables the record open-circuit voltages typically associated with heterojunction devices without the need for expensive patterning techniques. This article reviews the salient points of this technology. First, we briefly elucidate device characteristics. This is followed by a discussion of each processing step, device operation, and device stability and industrial upscaling, including the fabrication of solar cells with energy-conversion efficiencies over 21%. Finally, future trends are pointed out. (orig.)

765 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors review the dynamic field of crystalline silicon photovoltaics from a device-engineering perspective and give an up-to-date summary of promising recent pathways for further efficiency improvements and cost reduction employing novel carrierselective passivating contact schemes, as well as tandem multi-junction architectures, in particular those that combine silicon absorbers with organic-inorganic perovskite materials.
Abstract: With a global market share of about 90%, crystalline silicon is by far the most important photovoltaic technology today. This article reviews the dynamic field of crystalline silicon photovoltaics from a device-engineering perspective. First, it discusses key factors responsible for the success of the classic dopant-diffused silicon homojunction solar cell. Next it analyzes two archetypal high-efficiency device architectures – the interdigitated back-contact silicon cell and the silicon heterojunction cell – both of which have demonstrated power conversion efficiencies greater than 25%. Last, it gives an up-to-date summary of promising recent pathways for further efficiency improvements and cost reduction employing novel carrier-selective passivating contact schemes, as well as tandem multi-junction architectures, in particular those that combine silicon absorbers with organic–inorganic perovskite materials.

751 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The complex refractive index of planar CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature is investigated by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and spectrophotometry and results agree well with previously reported data of the absorption coefficient and are consistent with Kramers-Kronig transformations.
Abstract: The complex refractive index (dielectric function) of planar CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature is investigated by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and spectrophotometry. Knowledge of the complex refractive index is essential for designing photonic devices based on CH3NH3PbI3 thin films such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, or lasers. Because the directly measured quantities (reflectance, transmittance, and ellipsometric spectra) are inherently affected by multiple reflections, the complex refractive index has to be determined indirectly by fitting a model dielectric function to the experimental spectra. We model the dielectric function according to the Forouhi-Bloomer formulation with oscillators positioned at 1.597, 2.418, and 3.392 eV and achieve excellent agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results agree well with previously reported data of the absorption coefficient and are consistent with Kramers-Kronig transformations. The real part of the refractive index assumes a value of 2.611 at 633 nm, implying that CH3NH3PbI3-based solar cells are ideally suited for the top cell in monolithic silicon-based tandem solar cells.

502 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
06 Mar 2020-Science
TL;DR: Tandems that combine solution-processed micrometer-thick perovskite top cells with fully textured silicon heterojunction bottom cells are reported, which presents the possibility of overcoming the single-junction Shockley-Queisser limit in photovoltaics.
Abstract: Stacking solar cells with decreasing band gaps to form tandems presents the possibility of overcoming the single-junction Shockley-Queisser limit in photovoltaics. The rapid development of solution-processed perovskites has brought perovskite single-junction efficiencies >20%. However, this process has yet to enable monolithic integration with industry-relevant textured crystalline silicon solar cells. We report tandems that combine solution-processed micrometer-thick perovskite top cells with fully textured silicon heterojunction bottom cells. To overcome the charge-collection challenges in micrometer-thick perovskites, we enhanced threefold the depletion width at the bases of silicon pyramids. Moreover, by anchoring a self-limiting passivant (1-butanethiol) on the perovskite surfaces, we enhanced the diffusion length and further suppressed phase segregation. These combined enhancements enabled an independently certified power conversion efficiency of 25.7% for perovskite-silicon tandem solar cells. These devices exhibited negligible performance loss after a 400-hour thermal stability test at 85°C and also after 400 hours under maximum power point tracking at 40°C.

460 citations


Cited by
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[...]

08 Dec 2001-BMJ
TL;DR: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one, which seems an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality.
Abstract: There is, I think, something ethereal about i —the square root of minus one. I remember first hearing about it at school. It seemed an odd beast at that time—an intruder hovering on the edge of reality. Usually familiarity dulls this sense of the bizarre, but in the case of i it was the reverse: over the years the sense of its surreal nature intensified. It seemed that it was impossible to write mathematics that described the real world in …

33,785 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1988-Nature
TL;DR: In this paper, a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) is presented.
Abstract: Deposits of clastic carbonate-dominated (calciclastic) sedimentary slope systems in the rock record have been identified mostly as linearly-consistent carbonate apron deposits, even though most ancient clastic carbonate slope deposits fit the submarine fan systems better. Calciclastic submarine fans are consequently rarely described and are poorly understood. Subsequently, very little is known especially in mud-dominated calciclastic submarine fan systems. Presented in this study are a sedimentological core and petrographic characterisation of samples from eleven boreholes from the Lower Carboniferous of Bowland Basin (Northwest England) that reveals a >250 m thick calciturbidite complex deposited in a calciclastic submarine fan setting. Seven facies are recognised from core and thin section characterisation and are grouped into three carbonate turbidite sequences. They include: 1) Calciturbidites, comprising mostly of highto low-density, wavy-laminated bioclast-rich facies; 2) low-density densite mudstones which are characterised by planar laminated and unlaminated muddominated facies; and 3) Calcidebrites which are muddy or hyper-concentrated debrisflow deposits occurring as poorly-sorted, chaotic, mud-supported floatstones. These

9,929 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The broad tunability and fabrication methods of these materials, the current understanding of the operation of state-of-the-art solar cells and the properties that have delivered light-emitting diodes and lasers are described.
Abstract: Metal-halide perovskites are crystalline materials originally developed out of scientific curiosity. Unexpectedly, solar cells incorporating these perovskites are rapidly emerging as serious contenders to rival the leading photovoltaic technologies. Power conversion efficiencies have jumped from 3% to over 20% in just four years of academic research. Here, we review the rapid progress in perovskite solar cells, as well as their promising use in light-emitting devices. In particular, we describe the broad tunability and fabrication methods of these materials, the current understanding of the operation of state-of-the-art solar cells and we highlight the properties that have delivered light-emitting diodes and lasers. We discuss key thermal and operational stability challenges facing perovskites, and give an outlook of future research avenues that might bring perovskite technology to commercialization.

2,513 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
08 Jan 2016-Science
TL;DR: It is shown that using cesium ions along with formamidinium cations in lead bromide–iodide cells improved thermal and photostability and lead to high efficiency in single and tandem cells.
Abstract: Metal halide perovskite photovoltaic cells could potentially boost the efficiency of commercial silicon photovoltaic modules from ∼20 toward 30% when used in tandem architectures. An optimum perovskite cell optical band gap of ~1.75 electron volts (eV) can be achieved by varying halide composition, but to date, such materials have had poor photostability and thermal stability. Here we present a highly crystalline and compositionally photostable material, [HC(NH2)2](0.83)Cs(0.17)Pb(I(0.6)Br(0.4))3, with an optical band gap of ~1.74 eV, and we fabricated perovskite cells that reached open-circuit voltages of 1.2 volts and power conversion efficiency of over 17% on small areas and 14.7% on 0.715 cm(2) cells. By combining these perovskite cells with a 19%-efficient silicon cell, we demonstrated the feasibility of achieving >25%-efficient four-terminal tandem cells.

2,412 citations