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Institution

Adler Planetarium

ArchiveChicago, Illinois, United States
About: Adler Planetarium is a archive organization based out in Chicago, Illinois, United States. It is known for research contribution in the topics: Galaxy & Blazar. The organization has 122 authors who have published 439 publications receiving 42117 citations. The organization is also known as: Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum.
Topics: Galaxy, Blazar, Crab Nebula, Quasar, Supernova


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A series of improvements to the spectroscopic reductions are described, including better flat fielding and improved wavelength calibration at the blue end, better processing of objects with extremely strong narrow emission lines, and an improved determination of stellar metallicities.
Abstract: This paper describes the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), marking the completion of the original goals of the SDSS and the end of the phase known as SDSS-II. It includes 11,663 deg^2 of imaging data, with most of the ~2000 deg^2 increment over the previous data release lying in regions of low Galactic latitude. The catalog contains five-band photometry for 357 million distinct objects. The survey also includes repeat photometry on a 120° long, 2°.5 wide stripe along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap, with some regions covered by as many as 90 individual imaging runs. We include a co-addition of the best of these data, going roughly 2 mag fainter than the main survey over 250 deg^2. The survey has completed spectroscopy over 9380 deg^2; the spectroscopy is now complete over a large contiguous area of the Northern Galactic Cap, closing the gap that was present in previous data releases. There are over 1.6 million spectra in total, including 930,000 galaxies, 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data release includes improved stellar photometry at low Galactic latitude. The astrometry has all been recalibrated with the second version of the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog, reducing the rms statistical errors at the bright end to 45 milliarcseconds per coordinate. We further quantify a systematic error in bright galaxy photometry due to poor sky determination; this problem is less severe than previously reported for the majority of galaxies. Finally, we describe a series of improvements to the spectroscopic reductions, including better flat fielding and improved wavelength calibration at the blue end, better processing of objects with extremely strong narrow emission lines, and an improved determination of stellar metallicities.

5,665 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is presented, which demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z ≈ 1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory.
Abstract: We present the large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey region covers 0.72h −3 Gpc 3 over 3816 square degrees and 0.16 < z < 0.47, making it the best sample yet for the study of large-scale structure. We find a well-detected peak in the correlation function at 100h −1 Mpc separation that is an excellent match to the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the recombination-epoch acoustic oscillations on the low-redshift clustering of matter. This detection demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z ≈ 1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory. The acoustic peak provides a standard ruler by which we can measure the ratio of the distances to z = 0.35 and z = 1089 to 4% fractional accuracy and the absolute distance to z = 0.35 to 5% accuracy. From the overall shape of the correlation function, we measure the matter density mh 2 to 8% and find agreement with the value from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Independent of the constraints provided by the CMB acoustic scale, we find m = 0.273 ±0.025+0.123(1+ w0)+0.137K. Including the CMB acoustic scale, we find that the spatial curvature is K = −0.010 ± 0.009 if the dark energy is a cosmological constant. More generally, our results provide a measurement of cosmological distance, and hence an argument for dark energy, based on a geometric method with the same simple physics as the microwave background anisotropies. The standard cosmological model convincingly passes these new and robust tests of its fundamental properties. Subject headings: cosmology: observations — large-scale structure of the universe — distance scale — cosmological parameters — cosmic microwave background — galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD

4,428 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jennifer K. Adelman-McCarthy1, Marcel A. Agüeros2, S. Allam3, S. Allam1  +170 moreInstitutions (65)
TL;DR: The Sixth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDS) as discussed by the authors contains images and parameters of roughly 287 million objects over 9583 deg(2), including scans over a large range of Galactic latitudes and longitudes.
Abstract: This paper describes the Sixth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. With this data release, the imaging of the northern Galactic cap is now complete. The survey contains images and parameters of roughly 287 million objects over 9583 deg(2), including scans over a large range of Galactic latitudes and longitudes. The survey also includes 1.27 million spectra of stars, galaxies, quasars, and blank sky ( for sky subtraction) selected over 7425 deg2. This release includes much more stellar spectroscopy than was available in previous data releases and also includes detailed estimates of stellar temperatures, gravities, and metallicities. The results of improved photometric calibration are now available, with uncertainties of roughly 1% in g, r, i, and z, and 2% in u, substantially better than the uncertainties in previous data releases. The spectra in this data release have improved wavelength and flux calibration, especially in the extreme blue and extreme red, leading to the qualitatively better determination of stellar types and radial velocities. The spectrophotometric fluxes are now tied to point-spread function magnitudes of stars rather than fiber magnitudes. This gives more robust results in the presence of seeing variations, but also implies a change in the spectrophotometric scale, which is now brighter by roughly 0.35 mag. Systematic errors in the velocity dispersions of galaxies have been fixed, and the results of two independent codes for determining spectral classifications and red-shifts are made available. Additional spectral outputs are made available, including calibrated spectra from individual 15 minute exposures and the sky spectrum subtracted from each exposure. We also quantify a recently recognized underestimation of the brightnesses of galaxies of large angular extent due to poor sky subtraction; the bias can exceed 0.2 mag for galaxies brighter than r = 14 mag.

1,602 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Brian Yanny1, Constance M. Rockosi2, Heidi Jo Newberg3, Gillian R. Knapp4, Jennifer K. Adelman-McCarthy1, Bonnie Alcorn1, S. Allam1, Carlos Allende Prieto5, Carlos Allende Prieto6, Deokkeun An7, K. S. J. Anderson8, K. S. J. Anderson9, Scott F. Anderson10, Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones11, Steve Bastian1, Timothy C. Beers12, Eric F. Bell11, Vasily Belokurov13, Dmitry Bizyaev8, Norm Blythe8, John J. Bochanski10, William N. Boroski1, Jarle Brinchmann14, J. Brinkmann8, Howard Brewington8, Larry N. Carey10, Kyle M. Cudworth15, Michael L. Evans10, Nick Evans13, Evalyn Gates15, Boris T. Gänsicke16, Bruce Gillespie8, G. F. Gilmore13, Ada Nebot Gomez-Moran, Eva K. Grebel17, Jim Greenwell10, James E. Gunn4, Cathy Jordan8, Wendell Jordan8, Paul Harding18, Hugh C. Harris, John S. Hendry1, Diana Holder8, Inese I. Ivans4, Željko Ivezić10, Sebastian Jester11, Jennifer A. Johnson7, Stephen M. Kent1, S. J. Kleinman8, Alexei Y. Kniazev11, Jurek Krzesinski8, Richard G. Kron15, Nikolay Kuropatkin1, Svetlana Lebedeva1, Young Sun Lee12, R. French Leger1, Sébastien Lépine19, Steve Levine, Huan Lin1, Dan Long8, Craig P. Loomis4, Robert H. Lupton4, O. Malanushenko8, Viktor Malanushenko8, Bruce Margon2, David Martínez-Delgado11, P. M. McGehee20, Dave Monet, Heather L. Morrison18, Jeffrey A. Munn, Eric H. Neilsen1, Atsuko Nitta8, John E. Norris21, Daniel Oravetz8, Russell Owen10, Nikhil Padmanabhan22, Kaike Pan8, R. S. Peterson1, Jeffrey R. Pier, Jared Platson1, Paola Re Fiorentin11, Paola Re Fiorentin23, Gordon T. Richards24, Hans-Walter Rix11, David J. Schlegel22, Donald P. Schneider25, Matthias R. Schreiber26, Axel Schwope, Valena C. Sibley1, Audrey Simmons8, Stephanie A. Snedden8, J. Allyn Smith27, Larry Stark10, Fritz Stauffer8, Matthias Steinmetz, Christopher Stoughton1, Mark SubbaRao28, Mark SubbaRao15, Alexander S. Szalay29, Paula Szkody10, Aniruddha R. Thakar29, Sivarani Thirupathi12, Douglas L. Tucker1, A. Uomoto30, Daniel E. Vanden Berk25, S. Vidrih17, Yogesh Wadadekar31, Yogesh Wadadekar4, S. Watters8, R. Wilhelm32, Rosemary F. G. Wyse29, Jean Yarger8, Daniel B. Zucker13 
TL;DR: The Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Survey as mentioned in this paper obtained approximately 240,000 moderate-resolution spectra from 3900 to 9000 of fainter Milky Way stars (14.0 10 per resolution element).
Abstract: The Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Survey obtained {approx}240,000 moderate-resolution (R {approx} 1800) spectra from 3900 {angstrom} to 9000 {angstrom} of fainter Milky Way stars (14.0 10 per resolution element, stellar atmospheric parameters are estimated, including metallicity, surface gravity, and effective temperature. SEGUE obtained 3500 deg{sup 2} of additional ugriz imaging (primarily at low Galactic latitudes) providing precise multicolor photometry ({sigma}(g, r, i) {approx} 2%), ({sigma}(u, z) {approx} 3%) and astrometry ({approx}0.1) for spectroscopic target selection. The stellar spectra, imaging data, and derived parameter catalogs for this survey are publicly available as part of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7.

1,133 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Jennifer K. Adelman-McCarthy1, Marcel A. Agüeros2, S. Allam3, S. Allam1  +149 moreInstitutions (47)
TL;DR: The fourth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as discussed by the authors includes all survey-quality data taken through 2004 June, including five-band photometric data for 180 million objects selected over 6670 deg2 and 673,280 spectra of galaxies, quasars and stars selected from 4783 deg2 of those imaging data using the standard SDSS target selection algorithms.
Abstract: This paper describes the Fourth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), including all survey-quality data taken through 2004 June. The data release includes five-band photometric data for 180 million objects selected over 6670 deg2 and 673,280 spectra of galaxies, quasars, and stars selected from 4783 deg2 of those imaging data using the standard SDSS target selection algorithms. These numbers represent a roughly 27% increment over those of the Third Data Release; all the data from previous data releases are included in the present release. The Fourth Data Release also includes an additional 131,840 spectra of objects selected using a variety of alternative algorithms, to address scientific issues ranging from the kinematics of stars in the Milky Way thick disk to populations of faint galaxies and quasars.

1,110 citations


Authors

Showing all 125 results

NameH-indexPapersCitations
Lucy Fortson7136517831
H. J. Rose6720412484
Adam A. Miller6521323602
Geza Gyuk6020611553
Chris Lintott6023917848
Mark SubbaRao588749203
Ragnhild Lunnan5715910627
Lucianne M. Walkowicz5611528499
J. Grube551269224
L. Ciupik511277109
Shane L. Larson4213011900
D. Steele38684175
N. Karlsson35463684
Arfon M. Smith34944505
Aaron M. Geller321022824
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Institution in previous years
YearPapers
20225
202113
202024
201936
201816
201729