scispace - formally typeset

JournalISSN: 1053-5888

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine 

About: IEEE Signal Processing Magazine is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Signal processing & Digital signal processing. It has an ISSN identifier of 1053-5888. Over the lifetime, 2009 publication(s) have been published receiving 251441 citation(s).


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The theory of compressive sampling, also known as compressed sensing or CS, is surveyed, a novel sensing/sampling paradigm that goes against the common wisdom in data acquisition.
Abstract: Conventional approaches to sampling signals or images follow Shannon's theorem: the sampling rate must be at least twice the maximum frequency present in the signal (Nyquist rate). In the field of data conversion, standard analog-to-digital converter (ADC) technology implements the usual quantized Shannon representation - the signal is uniformly sampled at or above the Nyquist rate. This article surveys the theory of compressive sampling, also known as compressed sensing or CS, a novel sensing/sampling paradigm that goes against the common wisdom in data acquisition. CS theory asserts that one can recover certain signals and images from far fewer samples or measurements than traditional methods use.

8,847 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article provides an overview of progress and represents the shared views of four research groups that have had recent successes in using DNNs for acoustic modeling in speech recognition.
Abstract: Most current speech recognition systems use hidden Markov models (HMMs) to deal with the temporal variability of speech and Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to determine how well each state of each HMM fits a frame or a short window of frames of coefficients that represents the acoustic input. An alternative way to evaluate the fit is to use a feed-forward neural network that takes several frames of coefficients as input and produces posterior probabilities over HMM states as output. Deep neural networks (DNNs) that have many hidden layers and are trained using new methods have been shown to outperform GMMs on a variety of speech recognition benchmarks, sometimes by a large margin. This article provides an overview of this progress and represents the shared views of four research groups that have had recent successes in using DNNs for acoustic modeling in speech recognition.

7,700 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The gains in multiuser systems are even more impressive, because such systems offer the possibility to transmit simultaneously to several users and the flexibility to select what users to schedule for reception at any given point in time.
Abstract: Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) technology is maturing and is being incorporated into emerging wireless broadband standards like long-term evolution (LTE) [1]. For example, the LTE standard allows for up to eight antenna ports at the base station. Basically, the more antennas the transmitter/receiver is equipped with, and the more degrees of freedom that the propagation channel can provide, the better the performance in terms of data rate or link reliability. More precisely, on a quasi static channel where a code word spans across only one time and frequency coherence interval, the reliability of a point-to-point MIMO link scales according to Prob(link outage) ` SNR-ntnr where nt and nr are the numbers of transmit and receive antennas, respectively, and signal-to-noise ratio is denoted by SNR. On a channel that varies rapidly as a function of time and frequency, and where circumstances permit coding across many channel coherence intervals, the achievable rate scales as min(nt, nr) log(1 + SNR). The gains in multiuser systems are even more impressive, because such systems offer the possibility to transmit simultaneously to several users and the flexibility to select what users to schedule for reception at any given point in time [2].

4,913 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The article consists of background material and of the basic problem formulation, and introduces spectral-based algorithmic solutions to the signal parameter estimation problem and contrast these suboptimal solutions to parametric methods.
Abstract: The quintessential goal of sensor array signal processing is the estimation of parameters by fusing temporal and spatial information, captured via sampling a wavefield with a set of judiciously placed antenna sensors. The wavefield is assumed to be generated by a finite number of emitters, and contains information about signal parameters characterizing the emitters. A review of the area of array processing is given. The focus is on parameter estimation methods, and many relevant problems are only briefly mentioned. We emphasize the relatively more recent subspace-based methods in relation to beamforming. The article consists of background material and of the basic problem formulation. Then we introduce spectral-based algorithmic solutions to the signal parameter estimation problem. We contrast these suboptimal solutions to parametric methods. Techniques derived from maximum likelihood principles as well as geometric arguments are covered. Later, a number of more specialized research topics are briefly reviewed. Then, we look at a number of real-world problems for which sensor array processing methods have been applied. We also include an example with real experimental data involving closely spaced emitters and highly correlated signals, as well as a manufacturing application example.

3,984 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The goal of this article is to introduce the concept of SR algorithms to readers who are unfamiliar with this area and to provide a review for experts to present the technical review of various existing SR methodologies which are often employed.
Abstract: A new approach toward increasing spatial resolution is required to overcome the limitations of the sensors and optics manufacturing technology. One promising approach is to use signal processing techniques to obtain an high-resolution (HR) image (or sequence) from observed multiple low-resolution (LR) images. Such a resolution enhancement approach has been one of the most active research areas, and it is called super resolution (SR) (or HR) image reconstruction or simply resolution enhancement. In this article, we use the term "SR image reconstruction" to refer to a signal processing approach toward resolution enhancement because the term "super" in "super resolution" represents very well the characteristics of the technique overcoming the inherent resolution limitation of LR imaging systems. The major advantage of the signal processing approach is that it may cost less and the existing LR imaging systems can be still utilized. The SR image reconstruction is proved to be useful in many practical cases where multiple frames of the same scene can be obtained, including medical imaging, satellite imaging, and video applications. The goal of this article is to introduce the concept of SR algorithms to readers who are unfamiliar with this area and to provide a review for experts. To this purpose, we present the technical review of various existing SR methodologies which are often employed. Before presenting the review of existing SR algorithms, we first model the LR image acquisition process.

3,308 citations

Network Information
Related Journals (5)
IEEE Transactions on Image Processing

8.6K papers, 734.8K citations

88% related
IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing

13.6K papers, 822.8K citations

85% related
arXiv: Learning

45K papers, 837.1K citations

83% related
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications

7K papers, 595.1K citations

83% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202175
202084
201991
201881
201787
201670