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Manual Handling Workload and Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Nursing Personnel

01 Jan 2001-

TL;DR: This paper presents a meta-analysis of the literature on screening for Musculoskeletal Disorders and results show that screening for WMSDs in nurses’ high-risk patient care units results is positive.

Abstractiv Chapter 1: Introduction 1 Scope and Cost of Back Pain 2 Relationship of Musculoskeletal Pain to Workers’ Compensation Claims 3 Association with Strenuous Tasks 3 Chapter 2: Review of the Literature 6 Causes of Musculoskeletal Disorders 6 Body Parts Affected by WMSDs in Nursing 6 WMSD Risk Factors 6 Patient Handling and Movement Risk Factor Assessment 10 Patient Weight As Risk Factor 12 Assessing Risk 12 Exposure Assessment 16 Nursing Workload Measurement Systems 17 Risk Reduction Factors 19 Characteristics of James A. Haley VAMC High-Risk Patient Care Units 19 Screening for Musculoskeletal Disorders 20 Null Hypotheses 22 Definition of Terms 22 Chapter 3: Methods 27 Study Design 27 Sample and Sampling Procedures 27 Data Collection Procedures 28 Chapter 4: Results 30 Sample Size/Power Analysis 30 Data Analysis 30 Sample 30 Data Coding 32 Independent Variables 32

Topics: Workload (53%)

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Measuring the change in current back pain prevalence yields more timely information about the effectiveness of an ergonomic intervention than assessing injury incidence rates, because of the high percent of nursing staff members who work in pain but delay filing workers' compensation claims.
Abstract: 1. The problem of work related musculoskeletal disorders of the low back in nursing personnel has been well documented in the literature by cross sectional studies showing high prevalence rates in licensed nurses and nursing aides. However, it is difficult to compare findings among these studies because of the use of nonstandardized symptom surveys, variations in case definitions, and other methodological inconsistencies. 2. Measuring the change in current back pain prevalence yields more timely information about the effectiveness of an ergonomic intervention than assessing injury incidence rates, because of the high percent of nursing staff members who work in pain but delay filing workers' compensation claims. 3. As employers attempt to reduce manual handling injuries, occupational health nurses may be called upon to survey workers for musculoskeletal symptom prevalence and document the effectiveness of ergonomic interventions. Before using or developing any musculoskeletal disorder symptom survey for workplace surveillance or research, occupational health nurses should determine whether the survey has adequate reliability, validity, responsiveness, and practicality.

73 citations


Cites background from "Manual Handling Workload and Muscul..."

  • ...Forty six studies, including the author's doctoral research (Menzel, 2001), were chosen for further review....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders among nurses was high in the study area and working in mal-positions, working in the same positions for long period of time, working with disoriented patients and bending or twisting back during work were identified associated factors.
Abstract: Background: Musculoskeletal disorders represent a significant occupational problem among nurses; however, there is paucity of information on work related musculoskeletal disorder among nurses in Ethiopia. Objective: To assess work related musculoskeletal disorders and associated factors among nurses working in Jimma Zone Public hospitals, South west Ethiopia. Methods: Institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted in Jimma Zone public hospitals from March 12-27, 2015. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select 333 participants. Data were analyzed by using binary logistic regression and Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals used to examine associations between dependent and independent variables. Results: The prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders at any body site was 60.8% and the highest report 124 (67.8%) was seen in the lower back which was followed by the neck 44 (24%) and knees 43 (23.6%). Lifting and transferring dependent patients [AOR 2.1 (1.1-4.3)], giving wound care [AOR 4.2 (1.9-8.9)], working in medical ward [AOR 9.6 (2.4-38.3)] and Intensive care unit [AOR 3.4 (1.2-9.7)], working in mal-positions [AOR 9.7 (2.2-42.6)], working in the same positions for long period of time [AOR, 6.1 (1.3-28.7)], working with disoriented patients [AOR 2.6 ( 1.1-5.7) and bending or twisting back during work [AOR 5.1 (1.1-23.7)] were identified associated factors. Conclusion: The prevalence of work related musculoskeletal disorders among nurses was high in the study area. Lifting and transferring dependent patients, giving wound care, working in medical ward and Intensive care unit, working in mal-positions, working in the same positions for long period of time, working with disoriented patients and bending or twisting back during work were identified associated factors.

5 citations



Journal Article
TL;DR: Age and experience were significantly associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in the different body regions and the results indicated out of every 10 workers, in the last work week, seven reported complaints in the lower legs.
Abstract: Although Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) represents a common occupational problem, few epidemiological studies have investigated MSDs among industrial workers. MSDs are a common industrial health problem throughout the world and a serious cause of disability among the industrial workers.The goal of the study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms (ache, pain, or discomfort) among rubber workers in Iran, using the standard Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ). The study population consisted of 100 males with mean age 31.73. Out of every 10 workers, in the last work week, seven reported complaints in the lower legs. The results are also indicated age and experience were significantly associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in the different body regions.

4 citations


Cites background from "Manual Handling Workload and Muscul..."

  • ...[21]; Nursing personnel [19]; Information Technology professionals [22]; Production assembly workers [23]; Dental students [24]; notebook computer users [25]....

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References
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Book
01 Dec 1969
Abstract: Contents: Prefaces. The Concepts of Power Analysis. The t-Test for Means. The Significance of a Product Moment rs (subscript s). Differences Between Correlation Coefficients. The Test That a Proportion is .50 and the Sign Test. Differences Between Proportions. Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit and Contingency Tables. The Analysis of Variance and Covariance. Multiple Regression and Correlation Analysis. Set Correlation and Multivariate Methods. Some Issues in Power Analysis. Computational Procedures.

103,911 citations


Journal Article
Gunnar Borg1

4,086 citations


"Manual Handling Workload and Muscul..." refers methods in this paper

  • ...In later studies, Owen stopped measuring compressive forces to the back and used Borg Ratings of Perceived Exertion (Borg, 1970) exclusively to assess stressful of tasks 12 because in 1992 she found “no significant difference in findings using the Borg scale for perceived exertion and the more…...

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  • ...In later studies, Owen stopped measuring compressive forces to the back and used Borg Ratings of Perceived Exertion (Borg, 1970) exclusively to assess stressful of tasks 12 because in 1992 she found “no significant difference in findings using the Borg scale for perceived exertion and the more complicated, time consuming, and labor intensive biomechanical model methods” (Owen & Fragala, 1999, p. 318)....

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  • ...In later studies, Owen stopped measuring compressive forces to the back and used Borg Ratings of Perceived Exertion (Borg, 1970) exclusively to assess stressful of tasks...

    [...]


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Standardised questionnaires for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms in an ergonomic or occupational health context are presented and specific characteristics of work strain are reflected in the frequency of responses to the questionnaires.
Abstract: Standardised questionnaires for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms in an ergonomic or occupational health context are presented. The questions are forced choice variants and may be either self-administered or used in interviews. They concentrate on symptoms most often encountered in an occupational setting. The reliability of the questionnaires has been shown to be acceptable. Specific characteristics of work strain are reflected in the frequency of responses to the questionnaires.

4,037 citations


"Manual Handling Workload and Muscul..." refers background or methods in this paper

  • ...Kuorinka et al. (1987) found reliability varied from 0% to 23%, whereas “validity tests against clinical history” showed the number of non-identical answers varied between 0% and 20%” (p. 235)....

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  • ...At the end of the designated study week, the participants were asked to complete the one page Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ), which is based on the Nordic musculoskeletal symptom survey (Kuorinka et al., 1987)....

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  • ...At the end of the designated study week, the participants were asked to complete the one page Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ), which is based on the Nordic musculoskeletal symptom survey (Kuorinka et al., 1987)....

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Book
01 Jul 1982
Abstract: Part I: Foundations of Multiple Regression Analysis. Overview. Simple Linear Regression and Correlation. Regression Diagnostics. Computers and Computer Programs. Elements of Multiple Regression Analysis: Two Independent Variables. General Method of Multiple Regression Analysis: Matrix Operations. Statistical Control: Partial and Semi-Partial Correlation. Prediction. Part II: Multiple Regression Analysis. Variance Partitioning. Analysis of Effects. A Categorical Independent Variable: Dummy, Effect, And Orthogonal Coding. Multiple Categorical Independent Variables and Factorial Designs. Curvilinear Regression Analysis. Continuous and Categorical Independent Variables I: Attribute-Treatment Interaction, Comparing Regression Equations. Continuous and Categorical Independent Variables II: Analysis of Covariance. Elements of Multilevel Analysis. Categorical Dependent Variable: Logistic Regression. Part III: Structural Equation Models. Structural Equation Models with Observed Variables: Path Analysis. Structural Equation Models with Latent Variables. Part IV: Multivariate Analysis. Regression, Discriminant, And Multivariate Analysis of Variance: Two Groups. Canonical, Discriminant, And Multivariate Analysis of Variance: Extensions. Appendices.

3,867 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: RULA (rapid upper limb assessment) is a survey method developed for use in ergonomics investigations of workplaces where work-related upper limb disorders are reported.
Abstract: RULA (rapid upper limb assessment) is a survey method developed for use in ergonomics investigations of workplaces where work-related upper limb disorders are reported. This tool requires no special equipment in providing a quick assessment of the postures of the neck, trunk and upper limbs along with muscle function and the external loads experienced by the body. A coding system is used to generate an action list which indicates the level of intervention required to reduce the risks of injury due to physical loading on the operator. It is of particular assistance in fulfilling the assessment requirements of both the European Community Directive (90/270/EEC) on the minimum safety and health requirements for work with display screen equipment and the UK Guidelines on the prevention of work-related upper limb disorders.

2,303 citations


"Manual Handling Workload and Muscul..." refers background in this paper

  • ...McAtamney and Corlett’s Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA) (1993) is not suitable for assessing risk of back injury because of its focus on upper limbs....

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